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Full text of "Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare. Massachusetts. 1935-38"

3 



Public Document No. 17 

GUp (Eanwxonmtaliif of HJaaaarijitartta 

-fc 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT 

OF 

Public Welfare 

FOR THE 

Year Ending November 30, 1935 
parts i, ii, and iii 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Financjd 
3000 6-'36. Order 7885. 









foARB. OJTIC 




S79* 

a3j) of 



% 



W$t Commontoealtij ' of Jffla&sacfmsfette 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Richard K. Conant, Commissiorier * 

To the Honorable Senate anal House of Representatives: 

The Sixteenth Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare, covering 
the year from December 1, 1934, to November 30, 1935, is herewith respectfully 
presented. 

Members of the Advisory Board of the ^Department of Public Welfare 

Date of Original Date of 

Appointment Name Residence Expiration 

December 10, 1919 Jeffrey R. Brackett Boston December 1, 1937 

December 10, 1919 George Crompton Worcester .... December 1, 1936 

December 10, 1919 Mrs. Ada Eliot Sheffield .... Cambridge . . . December 1, 1935 

July 1,1931 Harry C. Solomon, M.D. . . . '. Boston December 1,1937 

December 21, 1932 Mrs. Ceeilia F. Logan .... Cohasset .... December 1, 1935 

February 28, 1934 Francis J. Murphy Salem December 1, 1936 

Divisions of the Department of Public Welfare 

Boston 
Division of Aid and Relief: Room 30, State House 
Frank W. Goodhue, Director 
Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor of Social Service 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Mothers' Aid 
Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor of Settlements 
John B. Gallagher, Supervisor of Relief 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance: 15 Ashburton Place 
Francis Bardwell, Superintendent 

Division of Child Guardianship: Room 43, State House 
Miss Winifred A. Keneran, Director 

Division of Juvenile Training: 41 Mt. Vernon Street 
Charles M. Davenport, Director 
Walter C. Bell, Executive Secretary 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent, Girls' Parole Branch 
C. Frederick Gilmore, Superintendent, Boys' Parole Branch 

Subdivision of Private Incorporated Charities: Room 37, State House 
Miss Florence G. Dickson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Alice M. Mclntire, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Mary C. Robinson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 

Subdivision of Town Planning: 14 Beacon Street 
Edward T. Hartman, Visitor to City and Town Planning Boards 

Subdivision of Crippled Children: 15 Ashburton Place 
Miss Margaret MacDonald, Supervisor 

Institutions under the Supervision of the Department of Public Welfare 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. Lawrence K. Kelley, M.D., Superintendent 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. Charles A. Dubois, Superintendent 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. George P. Campbell, Superintendent 
Industrial School for Girls,* Lansantor. -Miss Catharine. M. .Campbell, Superin- 
tendent *•• ! ; ■ . ; *} a J« " 

State Board of Housing: 209 Washington. Street 
Sidney T. Strickland, Chairman 

* Walter V. McCarthy, appointed JCommissi oner December 1, 1935. 



P.D. 17. 



Part I 
REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
To get at once for Massachusetts the full advantage of the Federal Social Se- 
curity Act we introduced at the end of the legislative session in August a bill 
which made the changes which were necessary in our laws to coordinate them 
with the Federal law. This bill provided for the acceptance of Federal funds by 
the appropriate state departments and made some necessary changes in our 
mothers' aid and old age assistance laws. In August also, an unemployment assist- 
ance bill was enacted to conform to the provisions of the Federal Act. 

Our mothers' aid law had been in effect since 1913 in practically the same form 
as the Social Security Act. It was only necessary for us to reduce from three 
years to one year the length of time during which an applicant must have resided 
within the state. Our old age assistance law enacted in 1931 also complied almost 
exactly with the Federal Act. It was only necessary for us to reduce the required 
length of residence within the state from twenty years to five years (which must 
be within the nine years just preceding the date of application), with one year of 
continuous residence immediately preceding the date of application. To comply 
with the Federal law the age qualification must be reduced from seventy years to 
sixty-five years before 1940. The entirely different system of old age benefits pay- 
able irrespective of need, to be financed under the Federal Act, by a Federal tax on 
payrolls, does not require state legislation because it is to be operated directly by 
the Federal Government. 

As to the six other forms of Federal subsidy provided for in the Social Security 
Act, Massachusetts was already well equipped with law and methods of work 
which will enable the appropriate departments to present plans to secure Federal 
participation. These services are vocational rehabilitation and aid to the blind 
under the Department of Education, maternal and child welfare work and public 
health work under the Department of Public Health and the care of homeless or 
neglected children under the Department of Public Welfare. The three depart- 
ments are co-operationg in the submission of a plan for the care of crippled 
children. 

The legislation which we recommended last year to discard the settlement 
laws as a basis for reimbursement and substitute a straight percentage subsidy of 
twenty-five per cent was referred for study to a Recess Commission. Cities and 
towns opposed the legislation vigorously because of a strong desire to retain the 
settlement laws as a protection against the residents of other towns coming for 
relief. In order to centralize the issue upon what seemed to us the most impor- 
tant reform, we submitted to the Commission a substitute bill. The substitute 
bill leaves the cities and towns to fight among themselves over settlements, but 
puts their relationship to the Commonwealth upon the basis of twenty-five per 
cent reimbursement in every case and discards the settlement laws as the basis of 
state reimbursements. 

The cost of welfare relief in Massachusetts is now over $30,000,000 a year. At 
present the Commonwealth is greatly handicapped in its efforts to improve the 
system. How can the visitors do their important work of investigating the need 
of the family for relief and of developing an honest and efficient administration 
when they must spend all their time in contesting with cities and towns the ques- 
tion of the legal settlement of the persons aided? 

Fifty of our state visitors devote themselves now almost entirely to the ques- 
tion of who shall pay the bill. If the city can prove that the person aided has not 
gained a legal settlement by five years' residence in a city or town or that he has 
lost his settlement by five years' absence, it can collect from the Commonwealth. 
About twenty per cent of the persons aided, or about 100,000 persons a year, are 
proved to have no legal ^settlement and the^ claims in t dispute amount to many 
millions of dollars ev.ery'ye^r. •*•".,:; : " ! : * 2* A * i *' * •• 

The state settlemtint' vjgftots JaVei ver£ expert* in' thfe complicated questions of 
settlement law and the cities and towns .suffer financially, although they use per- 
haps one-fifth of the time of three huncjrfed"' visitors in the contest over settlements. 



• . • • • • i 



Pt. I. 3 

This bill proposes to substitute for this state-wide controversy over settlements 
a partnership relation between state, cities and towns, in which the State will pay 
twenty-five per cent of the cost without regard to settlement, giving the State a 
general power of supervision. Instead of the enormous amount of red tape which 
at present requires in each case a notice, a visit, an authorization, and a bill, the 
State would pay twenty-five per cent on a single certificate of the city's expendi- 
tures for relief, and the visitors could turn their attention to the more important 
matters of investigating the need of the applicant for relief and helping the fami- 
lies out of their difficulties. The state temporary aid visitors, instead of trying 
to visit every case already supposed to be visited by the local visitors, could visit 
samples of cases and help the local visitors and local boards to improve their 
systems of work. 

This bill does not go as far as the bill which we proposed earlier in 1935, to dis- 
card settlement as a basis for reimbursement from town to town. It applies only 
to reimbursements from the State to cities and towns for relief in the home, includ- 
ing temporary aid, mothers' aid and old age assistance. In mothers' aid and old 
age assistance, the present percentage of reimbursement is one-third for settled 
cases and the whole amount in unsettled cases. To substitute a single system, 
twenty-five per cent for all cases, will operate fairly from a financial point of view. 
When expenditures for temporary aid or unemployment relief are high, the cities 
and towns will get larger reimbursements than they do under the present system. 
In times of depression it is fair that the Commonwealth should contribute more 
heavily to city and town expenditures. It should make this contribution accord- 
ing to a routine system rather than through special loans. In the long run the 
proposed bill will save money for cities, towns and State, by putting our efforts 
upon increased efficiency of administration of welfare relief instead of centering 
attention upon the question whether the bill for each case shall be paid from one 
of the taxpayer's pockets or from another, that is, from the state tax or from the 
local tax. 

Duties of the Department of Public Welfare 

The State Department of Public Welfare has the following principal duties: 

1. Supervision over the five state institutions of the Department: 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. 
Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. 

2. Direction of public relief, both indoor and outdoor, given to unsettled persons 

by cities and towns. 

3. Supervision of mothers' aid rendered by cities and towns. 

4. Supervision of old age assistance rendered by cities and towns. 

5. Care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and dependent children coming 

into the custody of the Department through court commitment or otherwise. 

6. Institutional custody and treatment of juvenile offenders committed by the 

courts to the three State Training Schools, and the care of these children in 
families when on parole. 

7. General supervision of the work of the city and town planning boards. 

8. Visitation and inspection of private incorporated charitable agencies; investiga- 

tion of petitions for the incorporation of private charities; and the require- 
ment and reception of annual returns from domestic and foreign charitable 
trusts and from foreign charitable corporations. 

Among the other supervisory and inspectional duties of the Department may be 
mentioned the following: 

1. Visitation and inspection of city and town infirmaries. 

2. Visitation and inspection of the five county training schools. 

3. Visitation and investigation of care given to all children supported by the 

several cities and towns. 

4. Visitation and investigation of care given to all adults supported in families, 

other than their own, by cities and towns. 



4 P.D. 17. 

5. Reception and classification of the annual returns of cities and towns relative 

to poor persons supported and relieved and the cost thereof. 

6. Visitation and inspection of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses. 

7. Investigation of legal settlement of persons, possibly state charges, who have 

been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, and of sane inmates of 
state institutions. 

8. Sending poor persons to the places within and without the Commonwealth 

where they belong. 

9. Investigation of petitions for adoption of children under fourteen years. 

10. Execution of the laws concerning infants and the licensing of infant boarding 

houses. 

11. Licensing maternity hospitals. 

12. Licensing boarding homes for the aged. 

13. Supervision of annual census of crippled children and social service for crippled 

children, especially for those unable to attend school. 

RICHARD K. CONANT, 
Commissioner of Public Welfare. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director 

The Division of Aid and Relief includes five subdivisions : Subdivision of Settle- 
ments, Subdivision of Relief, Subdivision of Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of Social 
Service, and Bureau of Old Age Assistance. 

The reports of the supervisors of these subdivisions and of the Superintendent 
of Old Age Assistance are herewith submitted. 

Subdivision of Settlements 

Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor 

The subdivision of settlements investigates the settlements of patients admitted 
to the State Infirmary, State Farm (infirmary department), State sanatoria, 
and the Massachusetts Hospital School, and generally supervises the settlement 
work of the division. There were 4 persons remaining in the infirmary depart- 
ment of the State Farm on November 30, 1935. These patients cannot be removed 
because of their physical condition. The facilities of the infirmary department 
are no longer available for the admission of dependent persons from cities and 
towns. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year in the 
examination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the state institutions: 

Settle- No Orders Total 





Examina- 


Orders 


ments 


Settle- 


With- 


Cases 


Institutions 


tions 


Issued 


Found 


ment 


drawn 


Returned 


State Infirmary 


3,324 


1009 


663 


148 


52 


863 


State Farm .... 


6 


6 


6 


2 


— 


8 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


210 


170 


158 


15 


— 


173 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


202 


171 


153 


5 


- 


158 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


318 


255 


220 


10 


— 


230 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


109 


92 


83 


10 


- 


93 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


26 


26 


24 


6 


- 


30 


Totals .... 


4,195 


1,729 


1,307 


196 


52 


1,555 


Cases pending No 


member 30, 


1934 . 




437 






Cases pending No^ 


/ember 30, 


1935 . 


. 


611 





Subdivision of Relief 

John B. Gallagher, Supervisor 

The subdivision of relief supervises public relief rendered by boards of public 
welfare and boards of health to persons, in their own homes and in hospitals, who 
have no settlement. 

The subdivision also investigates, upon the request of the Division of Voca- 
tional Education, the circumstances of persons receiving vocational training, who 
apply for aid during rehabilitation. 

Temporary Aid (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 18). — Cities and towns are author- 



Pt. I. 5 

ized by statute to furnish adequate assistance to poor persons having no lawful 
settlements, if so ordered by the Department of Public Welfare. 

On December 1, 1934, there were 23,502 continued cases including 94,008 per- 
sons, and during the year 40,800 notices were received from 310 cities and towns 
concerning 163,200 persons. 

Causes of Aid 



1933 1934 1935 





1933 


1934 


1935 


Orphans 


11 


14 


17 


Insanity- 


58 


40 


14 


Blindness . 


11 


6 


20 


Non-support 


86 


108 


85 


Miscellaneous 


3 


3 


- 



Illness 
Desertion . 
Widowhood 
Old Age 

Unemployment . 
Insufficient income 
Husband in correctional 
institution 



809 
630 
1,046 
168 
26,418 
867 

159 



1,542 
604 

1,056 

202 

29,838 

3,568 

187 



1,681 

491 

721 

268 

31,951 

5,374 

178 



Totals 



30,266 37,168 40,800 



The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for cur- 
rent and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts 
reimbursed for aid rendered cities and towns during the years designated: 



Year 



1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 (January 

1927-28 (July 

1928-29 (July 

1929-30 (July 

1930-31 (July 

1931-32 (July 

1932-33 (July 

1933-34 (July 

1934-35 (July 



1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 





Number of 




Number of 


Persons in 


Amounts 


Cases 


Families 


Reimbursed 


2,847 


12,339 


$48,192 85 


3,131 


13,434 


63,203 05 


4,848 


20,714 


108,337 29 


7,305 


32,056 


178,762 28 


5,165 


21,043 


159,205 53 


5,664 


22,258 


227,831 59 


4,358 


17,701 


261,217 44 


3,756 


15,668 


311,148 30 


3,223 


13,313 


334,565 05 


8,093 


32,372 


635,585 63 


6,472 


29,124 


586,296 43 


4,320 


19,370 


432,334 70 


5,765 


27,279 


642,439 34 


6,182 


28,429 


661,219 39 


5,584 


25,720 


622,301 80 


4,118 


18,611 


398,301 80 


6,406 


30,428 


888,745 85 


7,099 


27,126 


1,006,895 72 


8,639 


35,481 


1,179,154 09 


16,352 


69,496 


2,061,505 54 


27,465 


116,726 


3,106,030 88 


45,368 


183,740 


4,370,895 94 


51,494 


205,976 


3,563,335 79 


60,585 


242,340 


11,107 10 



Chapter 121, section 42, of the General Laws (Ter. Ed.) provides that claims 
against the Commonwealth shall be rendered to the department on or before the 
first day of October annually and shall be for the twelve months ending on the 
thirtieth day of June preceding. 

Shipwrecked Seamen (General Laws, ch. 102, sect. 5). — During the year only 
one notice was received, which was from Chatham, including ten persons. 

Sick State Poor (General Laws, ch. 122, sects. 17, 18). — The sick law provides 
that no persons shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be 
endrgigered by removal. 

CVties and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons having no legal 
settlement who are ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled hospitals, 
infirmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided such persons are 
not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when applying for 
assistance. 

On December 1, 1934, there were 335 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from 244 cities and towns concerning 11,420 persons repre- 
sented as too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases (General Laws, ch. Ill, sect. 116). — The law provides that 
a board of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the board of public wel- 
fare, of any person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public Health 
as dangerous to the public health. 



6 P.D. 17. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the family is furnished by the 
board of public welfare, unless the family is quarantined as provided in General 
Laws, chapter 111, section 95, in which event the board of health furnishes all aid 
required. In hospital cases, reimbursement by the Commonwealth is governed 
by the provisions of General Laws, chapter 122, section 18. 

On December 1, 1934, there were 287 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from boards of health of 122 cities and towns concerning 
2,011 persons ill with diseases declared dangerous to the public health. 

Burials (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 17). — The law provides that if the expense 
of burial is not paid by kindred "An amount not exceeding $40 for the funeral 
expenses of each person over 12 years of age, and not exceeding $20 for the funeral 
expenses of each person under that age, shall be paid by the Commonwealth; pro- 
vided that the board of public welfare shall file with each claim an affidavit of 
the undertaker stating the total amount of his bill, the amount received from the 
town, and the amount received from all other sources, and provided, further, that 
if the total expense of the burial, by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum 
of $100 no payment therefor shall be made by the Commonwealth." 

The number of burial claims received during the year was 621 from 97 cities 
and towns. 

Vocational Education (General Laws, ch. 74, sect. 22B). — The law provides 
that the Department of Public Welfare shall, upon request of the State Board of 
Vocational Education, make an investigation of the circumstances of persons 
actually in training afforded by said board, who apply for aid during rehabili- 
tation, and shall make a report of its finding to said board. 

During the year 9 applications were received and investigated, all of which were 
approved. 

Audit 

The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account of cases 
of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, burial, old age assistance, 
and mothers with dependent children are shown in the following tabulation. It is 
to be noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from the total 
paid out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the appropriation in ques- 
tion. This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by this 
department are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which the 
audit is shown. For actual expenditures from these appropriations see page 66. 

Classes of Cases Bills Claims Allowances Deductions 

Temporary Aid ..... 31,687 $5,077,350 34 $3,200,977 13* $1,876,373 21 

Sick State Poor 6,902 148,983 16 112,756 14 36,227 02 

Dangerous Diseases 1,223 116,496 79 94,999 51 21,497 28 

Burial 740 16,222 09 10,002 28 6,219 81 

Mothers with Dependent Children . . . 4,251 1,245,071 13 1,064,930 58 180,140 55 

Old Age Assistance. . . . . . 25,210 2,260,517 59 2,148,356 86 112,160 73 

Total 70,013 $8,864,641 10 $6,632,022 50 $2,232,618 60 

* Includes $7,317.42 for transportation of dependents. 

Removals 
The department is charged with the duty of removing sane poor persons to 
cities and towns within the Commonwealth, or, when not belonging in Massachu- 
setts, to the state or place where they belong. The following table show/ the 
removals made during the year. 

1933 1934 1935 

To other countries 97 30 47 

To other states 537 344 148 

To towns of residence 1,445 1,599 1,662 

2,079 1,973 1,857 

Supervision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses 

Boston and Springfield still maintain wayfarers' lodges. In Boston, 174 beds 
are maintained for men and 35 at the Chardon Street Home for Women and 
Children. The wayfarers' lodge for men, since remodelling and renovations, pro- 
vides clean, comfortable quarters for transient men. 



Pt. I. 7 

In the Springfield lodge, 17 beds are provided for men. 

All other cheap lodging houses are either commercial or are supported by chari- 
table organizations. In last year's report, the Federal government had set up 
homes for transient men at Springfield and Worcester. These have been discon- 
tinued as most of the men have been transferred to C. C. C. camps. The total 
number of beds in all the cheap lodging houses in Boston is less by 4 than last 
year's number. The total this year: 1,563 beds. 

It has been necessary, in a few cases, to call to the attention of the local boards 
of health conditions that the inspector felt should receive their consideration. 
The co-operation of the boards of health has always been given to the state depart- 
ment and the health conditions in the majority of these houses show the good 
work done by the health boards. 

It is evident that a sufficient number of beds is being provided for homeless men 
of this type throughout the Commonwealth and especially in the larger cities. 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid 

(General Laws, Chapter 118) 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor 

Statistics 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, on December 1, 1934, there were 4,123 
mothers with 11,909 dependent children under sixteen years of age receiving 
Mothers' Aid. 

They were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

628 mothers with 1,786 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

3,495 mothers with 10,123 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1 . Widows : 

2,953 mothers with 8,401 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

1,170 mothers with 3,508 dependent children. 

Note: The 1,170 living husbands classified as follows: 
531 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
118 were insane, and 
413 had chronic illness. Of these 
137 had tuberculosis and 
276 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
378 were deserting husbands. 
192 were divorced or legally separated. 
69 were in jail. 

During the year 1,066 new cases were aided and 771 cases were closed, so that 
there were 4,418 mothers in receipt of Mothers' Aid at the close of the fiscal year 
(November 30, 1935). 

The new cases that were received during the fiscal year included 1,066 mothers 
with 3,239 dependent children, and were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 226 mothers with 687 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 840 mothers with 2,552 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 674 mothers with 2,028 dependent children. 



8 P.D. 17, 

2. Not widows: 392 mothers with 1,211 dependent children. 
Note: The 392 living husbands, classified as follows: 
107 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
34 were insane, ami 
133 had chronic illness. Of these 
57 had tuberculosis and 
76 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
100 were deserting husbands. 
94 were divorced or legally separated. 
3] were in jail. 

Of the 1,066 new Mothers' Aid cases 146 were reopened cases as follows: 

Families removed from one town to another, 32. Insufficient income, 88. Con- 
formity with policies, 16. Husband returned to institution, 2. Home re-estab- 
lished, 2. Husband returned to jail, 2. Husband deserted, 3. Legally separated 
from husband, 1. Total, 146. 

Reasons for closing Mothers' Aid cases: 

Sufficient income, 307. Applicant remarried, 44. Family moved, 53. Hus- 
band resumed support of family, 47. Non-conformity with policies, 45. Youngest 
child sixteen years of age, 144. Unfitness of mother, 47. Transferred to other 
sources of relief, 34. Applicant died, 21. Male lodger, 8. Applicant in hos- 
pital, 11. Unsuitable housing, 4. Only dependent child under sixteen years of 
age in hospital, 5. Only dependent child under sixteen years of age died, 1. 
Total, 771. 

Duration of Mothers' Aid cases closed between December 1, 1934, an d November 
30, 1935: 

Less than 1 year, 212. Less than 2 years, 101. Less than 3 years, 94. Less 
than 4 years, 71. Less than 5 years, 49. Less than 6 years, 35. Less than 7 
years, 38. Less than 8 years, 30. Less than 9 years, 28. Less than 10 years, 12. 
Less than 11 years, 21. Less than 12 years, 16. Less than 13 years, 17. Less than 
14 years, 18. Less than 15 years, 12. Less than 16 years, 10. Less than 17 years, 6. 
Less than 22 years, 1. Total, 771. 

Number of Mothers' Aid Cases Active at End of Each Fiscal Year Since the 
Enactment of the Law of 1913 



1914 




2,334 ] 


L925 . . 


. . . 2,870 


1915 




2,798 : 


L926 








2,633 


1916 




3,035 ] 


[927 








2,592 


1917 




3,242 ] 


L928 








2,602 


1918 




3,366 ] 


1929 








2,603 


1919 




3,743 ] 


.930 








2,795 


1920 




3,330 ] 


.931 








2,982 


1921 




3,407 1 


.932 








3,379 


1922 




3,371 1933 








3,912 


1923 




3,072 1934 








4,123 


1924 




2,900 1935 








4,418 




State Appropriations and Reimbursements for Moth 


ers' Aid 








Appropriations 


Reimbursements 


Sept. 1 


1913, to Nov. 30, 1914 




. $175,000 00 


$174,999 36 


Dec. 1, 


1914, to Nov. 30, 1915 




250,000 00 


249,999 62 


Dec. 1, 


1915, to Nov. 30, 1916 




300,000 00 


299,998 78 


Dec. 1, 


1916, to Nov. 30, 1917 




400,000 00 


399,999 79 


Dec. 1, 


1917, to Nov. 30, 1918 




475,000 00 


474,999 63 


Dec. 1, 


1918, to Nov. 30, 1919 




550,000 00 


549,999 56 


Dec. 1, 


1919, to Nov. 30, 1920 




775,000 00 


775,028 78 


Dec. 1, 


1920, to Nov. 30, 1921 




900,( 


)00 


00 


899,99 


8 94 



Pt. I. 





Appropriations 


Reimbursements 


Dec. 1, 1921, to Nov. 30, 1922 . 


$850,000 00 


$849,999 48 


Dec. 1, 1922, to Nov. 30, 1923 . 


900,000 00 


899,999 43 


Dec. 1, 1923, to Nov. 30, 1924 . 


950,000 00 


949,999 97 


Dec. 1, 1924, to Nov. 30, 1925 . 


1,080,000 00 


1,079,997 87 


Dec. 1, 1925, to Nov. 30, 1926 . 


900,000 00 


900,000 00 


Dec. 1, 1926, to Nov. 30, 1927 . 


1 850,000 00 


2 359,967 34 


Dec. 1, 1927, to Nov. 30, 1928 . 


1 1,050,032 66 


661,175 17 


Dec. 1, 1928, to Nov. 30, 1929 . 


861,857 49 


830,723 24 


Dec. 1, 1929, to Nov. 30, 1930 . 


871,134 25 


851,963 61 


Dec. 1, 1930, to Nov. 30, 1931 . 


899,170 64 


875,489 19 


Dec. 1, 1931, to Nov. 30, 1932 . 


948,681 45 


938,940 00 


Dec. 1, 1932, to Nov. 30, 1933 . 


. 1,109,741 45 


1,109,740 55 


Dec. 1, 1933, to Nov. 30, 1934 . 


1,050,000 90 


1,050,000 73 


Dec. 1, 1934, to Nov. 30, 1935 . 


. 1,065,000 17 


1,065,000 05 



Subdivision of Social Service 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor 

To evaluate social service is impossible because human values are intangible 
and cannot be tabulated in facts or figures, but a few observations may be oppor- 
tune and interesting. Mrs. Ada E. Sheffield, a former member of the Advisory 
Board of the Department of Public Welfare for many years, saw the human needs 
of the 3,000 sick and dependent persons who were yearly seeking refuge and 
release from pain at the State Infirmary. She had sympathetic imagination 
enough to realize from whence they came, and the conditions to which they must 
return unless the State intervened with a human individualized service. She 
began, with the assistance of two volunteer workers, by making a brief survey of 
200 cases in the maternity ward to determine what became of the unmarried 
mothers and babies after they left the hospital. Needless to say, she found dis- 
aster, destitution and suffering among them as they tried to rehabilitate them- 
selves unaided in a friendless world. Many were too incompetent even to leave 
the hospital because of mental and physical handicaps, others were too ashamed 
to return to their families or friends, and suitable work with proper protection 
was rarely obtainable. The force of circumstances frequently turned them back 
to the undesirable companions and environment which had been their downfall. 
As a result of this survey, a social worker was assigned to the maternity ward. 

From that small beginning, the staff of workers has now increased to ten social 
workers, a part-time attorney and three secretaries, who give some service to all 
patients at the State Infirmary except the insane, who are legally in the custody 
of the Department of Mental Diseases. 

In 1923 the Superintendent asked that social service be extended to the men 
patients because of the great number, their long stays in the hospital and their 
utter friendlessness and homelessness. The doctors had come to appreciate the 
value of the social aspects of the patient's life in diagnosis and treatment and 
that readmissions would be fewer if intelligent planning was made for permanent 
rehabilitation. 

Men 

The Men's Hospital continues to be greatly overcrowded. The number of beds 
for the care of the chronic sick is never adequate; in fact, many of the aged who 
are in the house and annex wards should be in the hospital wards. 

In so far as is humanly possible, patients who have legal residence in cities and 
towns have been urged to make other hospital arrangements. As patients without 
legal settlement must be admitted, some discretion as to admissions is necessary 
in order to maintain hospital standards. About fifty men are admitted each week, 
some of whom are very ill, needing many weeks of medical care and often becom- 
ing chronic, so that the hospital wards are filled with permanent cases with very 
little turnover. On December 1, 263 patients had legal residences; 110 came 
from large cities which should provide for their own in local infirmaries or private 

1 Unexpended balance used for ensuing year. 

2 Affected by Chapter 241, Section 42, of the General Laws""(Tercentenary Edition) which changed the 
billing period. 



10 P.D. 17. 

nursing homes. The low cost plus the good care given result in an increasing 
demand in the Infirmary. Frequently applications from cities have had to be 
refused in order that consideration might be given to small towns with fewer 
resources in money, hospital beds and nursing care. 

"Stonecroft" houses about 600 able-bodied and younger ambulatory men, who 
do much of the domestic and farm work of the institution. A reading room has 
recently been equipped which has added much comfort and pleasure to the leisure 
hours of the men. The admission of men with the diagnosis of alcoholism has 
increased from 115 in the last year of prohibition to 327 in 1935. The men who 
are discharged in great numbers in March and April of each year are usually 
those who are alcoholic. They are unskilled laborers, due to their habits, working 
only short periods to earn enough to drink, and returning to the Infirmary in the 
late summer and autumn to remain for the winter. This has become the habit of 
many men for several years and what to do about them is always a question. 
Certainly the State Infirmary is not the solution. Would a State Camp or Farm 
more adequately meet the need? 

One hundred ninety-three (193) men, 183 less than last year, were treated for 
venereal disease. This is a noticeable reduction in line with public health statis- 
tics and would indicate that the public knowledge of the disease, with better 
facilities for treatment, may eventually control the disease. 

The Federal Transient Service was discontinued September 15 and only tran- 
sients who were in care at that date have continued to receive service. This year 
240 Federal transients were admitted to the State Infirmary for acute and chronic 
conditions. One hundred ninety-one (191) were discharged back to the Federal 
Transient Camps and Centers, 29 absconded, 5 died and 15 remain. 

Three social workers carry the social service for the men, which is far too heavy 
a case load. There are many for whom much more might be done, but all must 
have some attention and only a few get the intensive service which the workers 
would gladly give. 

Women 

The number of admissions to the women's wards remains about the same — 
between 600 and 700 yearly. The social adjustments within and without the hos- 
pital require much individual consideration. Respect for personality implies 
understanding, sympathy and intelligence, and the social worker to serve ade- 
quately must have these qualities plus a certain amount of training to prevent 
experimentation on those who have already suffered many adversities. 

One hundred ninety-two (192) were treated for venereal disease, 78 for syphilis 
and 114 for gonorrheal infection, a total of 80 less than 1935. Some of these 
patients are obliged to stay many months, due to the chronic nature of the disease, 
and their social situations do not permit them to return to the community for 
clinic treatment. Sixty-nine (69) were admitted from state institutions, 33 from 
the State Industrial School for Girls, 19 from the Reformatory for Women, 6 from 
the Defective Delinquent Colony at Bridgewater, 6 from schools for the feeble- 
minded and 5 from the Monson State Hospital. All, except two, were illegiti- 
mately pregnant and came for confinement care. Thirty-one (31) girls were 
admitted from the Division of Child Guardianship, 4 of whom were illegitimately 
pregnant. It is regrettable that the young girls are obliged to come to a public 
infirmary, as the wards do not allow for separation of groups. One hundred thirty 
(130) women and girls were admitted for illegitimate confinement, 15 of whom 
were married. Twenty-four (24) women were admitted for convalescense from 
illegitimate confinements and were accompanied by their babies. Fourteen (14) 
women were admitted for legitimate confinement, coming from the surrounding 
towns. There were 14 legitimate births and 146 illegitimate births. 

The mentally defective girls and women who should be institutionalized because 
of their inability to live normally or happily in the community will always be a dis- 
turbing element in the wards. They cannot be recommended for employment 
because of their instability and their incompetency to adjust themselves to any 
work, or in their homes. The psychiatrist has given skillful advice and assistance 
in determining the ability of these girls. The State Infirmary is a hospital and 
should not be expected to house a group who need schooling and industrial training. 



Pt. I. 11 

Children 

On November 30, 1935, there were at the State Infirmary 184 minors, 100 girls 
and 84. boys. Fifty-three (53) were admitted between the ages of 16 and 21; 
42 between 3 and 16 years, and 87 under three years of age. Of those between 
the ages of 16 and 21 years, 11 had venereal disease, 9 were pregnant, 4 had 
tuberculosis, 9 were feeble-minded, 5 had congenital syphilis, 1 had tuberculosis, 
7 had miscellaneous diseases, and 1 was well. Of the babies, 2 were feeble-minded, 
3 had congenital syphilis, 16 had other diseases, and 66 were well and awaiting 
social disposition with their mothers. Of the total number, 53 were wards of the 
Division of Child Guardianship, 10 were wards of the Industrial School for Girls, 
and 59 were born at the State Infirmary. 

Thirteen (13) children were admitted with hydrocephalus, an unusually large 
number, but each child presents a difficult home situation. Some came from 
homes where there were several other children, who were disturbed at the strange 
development of a little brother or sister, and the mother was obliged to give so 
much time to the sick child that the others were neglected. Other mothers had 
become nervously ill because of the care necessary for the children plus the disap- 
pointment and heartbreak. It seems only human to allow these children the 
seclusion and good care given at the State Infirmary. 

Chaplain's Service 

For many years the Roman Catholic Church has served the patients at the 
Infirmary with wise and sympathetic chaplains, who have devoted their full time 
to the spiritual needs of the patients. The consolation -which has been so helpful 
in the everyday living of the sick has been recognized by the patients of the 
Protestant faith, who have not had such service. The village minister has had 
the two-fold responsibility of his own parish and the Protestant patients at the 
Infirmary, who have had a Sunday afternoon service in the chapel and one or two 
afternoons weekly when the patients were visited in the wards. In such a limited 
time it was impossible for him to give to the sick all which he desired and all which 
they wanted and needed. 

Since June of this year a full-time chaplain of rare understanding and sincerity 
has been serving the long recognized needs of the Protestant patients. He spends 
five days', a week visiting those who indicate their wish to see him, all who are 
placed on the dangerous list and those who are about to undergo operations who 
may need encouragement. The patients are pathetically grateful for that which 
the Protestant faith accepts as one of its great missions — chaplain service by 
wise, sympathetic men, trained in the art of ministering to the souls of the sick. 

Supervision and Placement 

To interview the patients at the State Infirmary, make the necessary investiga- 
tion and plan for return to the community, is only the beginning of a long social 
treatment and service to the many individuals who may need much advice and 
assistance before they become self-reliant, self-supporting and self-respecting. 
The unmarried mother, when she returns to her home or to work, has a difficult 
process of adjustment to make with her environment and with herself. Nothing 
is quite the same after such an experience and often she has her baby to consider 
and plan for. The mother is encouraged to keep her baby with her, at least 
through the first two years. The affection for the child is often the stabilizing 
force in the mother's life and develops her character, bringing out strength and 
unselfishness in devotion to her child. The baby, if the mother has a good family, 
will establish himself in his most natural group where he will have family relations 
which are invaluable as he grows older. When to separate a mother and child, 
which sometimes is for the best interests of both, requires the skill and under- 
standing of the experienced worker. Many visits to the homes for places of em- 
ployment, replacements when jobs prove unsuitable, hospital and clinic visits to 
assure health to both mother and child are all necessary service. The special 
attention in planning for leisure time is also essential. 

Employment has been very difficult to find this year, and more women have 
been obliged to board their babies than formerly. Wages are small, so that many 
children have to be boarded with the Division of Child Guardianship, as mothers 



12 P.D. 17. 

cannot pay full board elsewhere. Some girls have become so anti-social that for 
their own protection they are persuaded to go to the House of the Good Shepherd, 
which is most generous in its co-operation. Girls from the Division of Child 
Guardianship, the Girls' Parole Branch and the Massachusetts General Hospital 
are referred for supervision when, at twenty-one years of age, they are friendless 
and are likely to need assistance. Older women are placed at employment and 
some, who are too old or too physically handicapped to work, are rehabilitated in 
the community with the assistance of the local boards of public welfare. 

Another function of the Subdivision is to receive certain applications from social 
agencies, such as the Salvation Army Home, the Catholic Charitable Bureau, the 
Chardon Street Home, etc., to care for women and girls who might otherwise be 
sent to the Infirmary if immediate assistance is not available. There are very 
few social resources, even in Boston, for older women. 

< The social agencies working with men also refer certain homeless men for con- 
sideration and plan which may prevent institutional care. Furthermore, many 
men who have been discharged from the Infirmary will appeal to the workers for 
assistance to prevent readmission. Such service if increased could keep many 
other men from the Infirmary, thus giving them the possibility of independence 
rather than public dependency. A social investigation for applicants at the Boston 
Institutions Department would help many men adjust their own problems effec- 
tively and reduce the admissions to the State Infirmary. 

Transients and Homeless 

Again this year great commendation should be given the Federal Transient 
Service through the State for its human and intelligent care of the thousands who 
eagerly and honestly want work and in desperation have traveled everywhere 
looking for it. There were those who liked the adventure of tramping the country, 
but they, too, have been treated wisely and kindly. Although the relief laws of 
this State permit the care of the non-resident and homeless, it is not given gener- 
ously or with thoughtful planning to prevent transiency. The State might learn 
from this experiment and provide its own institution or colony for the wayfarer 
within our gates. 

Throughout the year until September 15, 1935, transients (persons or families 
within the State one year or less) received adequate assistance from the Federal 
Transient Service Centers and Camps located in various parts of the State. Per- 
sons applying for public relief, who did not come within this group and who had 
been longer than one year but less than five years in Massachusetts, were given 
transportation by the local boards of public welfare, or this subdivision, to their 
home states, if legal residences could be established or relatives offered assistance. 

The number of transient applications to this subdivision doubled and tripled as 
soon as the Federal Transient Service closed. This was to be expected, as many 
persons evidently familiar with the service and not anticipating its discontinu- 
ance, found themselves stranded. The applications in October and November 
were about the same as in 1933, before the institution of the Transient Service. 
The Travelers Aid Societies have taken the responsibility for the great bulk of the 
applicants and have referred only those for whom no transportation money could 
be secured. The Boston Overseers of the Public Welfare have referred the next 
largest number, some of whom have refused to return to their home states and 
others who had lost their residence because of long absence. These latter persons 
were provided for by the public and private agancies, and the former made their 
own plans, which usually indicated that they had hidden assets. 

The ever encouraging and inspiring discovery about these transients was their 
great desire for work — that they had never ceased to look for work and although 
their journeying in some instances covered years, they seemed never to lose hope 
that the next place might bring them success. 



Pt. I. 

Applications for Transportation 

Total Number of Applications: Ages of Applicants 



Single men 

Single women 

Couples 

Families 

One parent with child 

Total 



28 and 24 children 
9 and 19 children 



115 and 43 children 



Under 15* years 
15-20 years 
20-25 years 
25-30 years 
30-35 years 
35-40 years 
40-50 years 
Over 50 years 

Total . 



24 Returned to other countries . 

66 Returned to other states 

3 Returned to settlement in Massachusetts 
8 Referred to other agencies 

10 Refused to accept transportation 

Acceptance refused by alleged place of set- 

4 tlement ...... 

115 Total 



36 U. S Immigration Service 

30 Boards of Public Welfare 

28 Private Agencies 

4 

4 Total 



* Accompanied by parents. 

Disposition of Applications: 
Returned to legal residence 
Returned to relatives .... 
Returned to work ..... 
Referred to other agencies 
Refused to accept transportation 
Acceptance refused by alleged place of settle- 
ment ....... 

Total 

Social Agencies Referring for Transportation: 
Travelers Aid Society 
Applicants direct . 
Boston Overseers of Public Welfare 
Veterans' Bureau . 
Jewish Family Welfare Association 

Women and Children admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year ending 

November 80, 1935 



13 



43 
19 
19 
11 
19 
13 
18 
16 

115 



115 



2 

1 

10 

115 



Ages at Admission 



Under 1 year of age 
1 to 7 years of age 
8 to 16 years of age 
17 to 21 years of age 
Over 21 years of age 



Sources of Admission 
Under 1: 

Boards of Public Welfare 
Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Other institutions . . " . 



1 to 7: 
Boards of Public Welfare 
Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston . 
Division of Child Guardianship 



8 to 16: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Institutions Registration Department 

Boston ..... 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls 



17 to 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health .... 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

Industrial School for Girls 

State Farm ...... 

Reformatory for Women 
Division of Child Guardianship 



Over 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare 

Boards of Health .... 

Institutions Registration Department, 
Boston ...... 

State Schools for Feeble-minded . 

Reformatory for Women 

Monson State Hospital 

State Farm 



120 

6 

11 

5 

5 

374 



Diseases at Admission 
Under 1: 
Infancy 

Miscellaneous diseases 
No disease . 
Syphilis 
Feeble-mindedness 



1 to 7: 

Feeble-mindedness 
Miscellaneous diseases 



8 to 16: 

Feeble-mindedness 
Gonorrhea . 
Tuberculosis 
Pregnancy . 
Miscellaneous diseases 
No disease . 



17 to 21: 

Tuberculosis 
Gonorrhea . 
Feeble-mindedness 
Pregnancy . 
Miscellaneous diseases 



Over 21: 

Tuberculosis 
Gonorrhea . 
Syphilis 
Pregnancy . 
Miscellaneous diseases 
Cancer 

Arteriosclerosis 
Feeble-mindedness 



614 



5 

10 

15 

1 

6 

1 

12 

17 

2 

39 



11 
19 
1 
61 
40 



44 
8 

10 

71 

218 

7 

15 
1 

"374 



14 

Women and Children discharged from the 

November 

Discharged to: 

Relatives and friends .... 184 

Husband ...... 14 

Employment . . . . . 55 

Employment with child (12 women with 

13 children) 25 

Private agencies ..... 14 

Place of settlement .... 42 
Deported by United States Immigration 

Service ...... 1 

Division of Child Guardianship . . 74 
Girls' Parole Department (21 women and 

12 children) 33 



P.D. 17. 

State Infirmary during the Year ending 
30, 1935 



Discharged to: 

Court ...... 

To other states . . 

Reformatory for Women (22 women and 
15 children) .... 

State Schools for Feeble-minded 

State Hospitals for Mental Diseases 

Other institutions 

To other countries 

Boards of Health 

Absconded ..... 

Total 



14 
14 

37 
25 
1 
4 
2 
2 
62 



Men admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 30, 1935 



Ages at Admission 




Diseases at Admission 






15 to 40 


416 


15 to 40: 


41 to 60 


878 


Tuberculosis ..... 69 


Over 60 


802 


Gonorrhea . 






51 







Syphilis 






16 




2,096 


Alcoholism . 






32 


(Readmissions 1,202) 




Heart . 
Miscellaneous diseases 






2 
236 


Sources of Admission 




Epilepsy . - . 






2 


15 to 40: 




No disease . 






8 


Boards of Public Welfare 


178 





Boards of Health .... 


19 


416 


Institutions Registration Department, 




41 to 60: 


Boston ...... 


205 


Tuberculosis ..... 70 


Transient Bureaus and Federal Camps . 


14 


Gonorrhea . 






7 







Syphilis 






11 




416 


Alcoholism . 
Arteriosclerosis 






138 
80 


41 to 60: 




Cancer 






5 


Boards of Public Welfare 


369 


Heart 






7 


Boards of Health .... 


5 


Epilepsy 






1 


Institutions Registration Department, 




Miscellaneous diseases 






526 


Boston ...... 


463 


No disease . 






33 


State Farm ...... 


1 





Transient Bureaus and Federal Camps . 


40 


r, C n 878 







Over 60: 




878 


Tuberculosis . ... . . 31 






Alcoholism . 






38 


Over 60: 




Arteriosclerosis 






355 




427 


Syphilis 






1 


Boards of Health ..... 


2 


Cancer 






7 






Heart .... 






27 


Boston ....... 


345 


Epilepsy . . 






1 




2 


Miscellaneous diseases 






329 


Transient Bureaus and Federal Camps . 


26 


No disease . 






13 



802 



802 



Men discharged from the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 30, 1935 



To relatives . 






46 


To place of settlement 






105 


To Court 






1 


To employment 






23 


To other states 






6 


To other countries . 






2 


To Board of Health 






1 



To other institutions 
Without investigation but interviewed 
Absconded ..... 
To Transient Bureaus and Federal Camps 



49 
711 
530 
191 

1,665 



Social Service for Men 

Men receiving social service consideration (short service, 564; intensive service, 295) 

Miscellaneous services to patients in wards 

Men discharged without investigation but interviewed 

Social Service cases assisted in the community 

Employment found ...... 

Men assisted in community while looking for work . 



859 
2,500 
712 
45 
130 
316 



Summary of Court Work 

Warrants on illegitimacy complaints . . . . ' . . . . . . .28 

Cases appealed to Superior Court (4 lost) .......... 7 

Adjudication's of paternity and court orders for support ........ 17 

Agreements for support of illegitimate children ........ 10 

Lump sum settlements for support of illegitimate children ($1,000; $750; $500) .... 3 

Adoptions of children .............. 4 

Money collected for support of illegitimate children ........ $4,051 62 

Money paid out for support of illegitimate children . . . . . . . . $5,159 21 

Number of bank accounts for illegitimate children ........ 63 

Balance on hand for illegitimate children, November 30, 1935 ...... $13,110 18 



Pt. I. 15 

Summary of Placement Work 

Persons under active supervision November 30, 1935 . . . . . . . 411 

65 mothers with 65 children at work ........ 130 

60 mothers boarding children in foster homes ...... 60 

Other women under supervision . . ... . . . . • 195 

Other children under supervision ......... 26 

411 

Children referred for replacement to Division of Child Guardianship ... 43 

(By State Infirmary, 36) ; (by mothers, 7) 

Girls over 21, accepted for supervision: 

(From Division of Child Guardianship) 10 

(From Girls' Parole Branch) 4 

14 

Adoptions ............... 4 

(By relatives, 2) ; (by strangers, 2) 
Marriages ............... 11 

Recidivists u,nder supervision ............ 3 

Replacements .............. 119 

62 saving^ accounts for clients at work .......... $7,133 83 

Visits to clients .............. 716 

Visits at home and at work ........... 408 

Visits elsewhere and at office .......... 308 

Visits of investigation ............. 300 

Wage homes investigated ............ 67 

Visits of clients to hospitals ............ 114 

Applications at office: 

(For maternity service) .......... 24 

(For social treatment) .......... 24 

(Transportation) ........... 115 

163 

General Summary 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary . . . . . . .614 

Births at the State Infirmary (146 illegitimate; 14 legitimate) ....... 160 

Men admitted to the State Infirmary . . . 2,096 

Women and children discharged by Subdivision of Social Service ...... 603 

Men discharged by Subdivision of Social Seryice . . . . . . . . . 1,665 

Women and children discharged directly to other divisions ....... 107 

Deaths at the State Infirmary (hospital wards) (127 women; 419 men) 546 

Applications for assistance at office . . . . . . . . . . . 163 

Persons under supervision in the community, November 30, 1935 (411 women and children; 45 

men) ................ 456 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance 

Francis Bardwell, Superintendent 

The Old Age Assistance Law went into effect July 1, 1931, and payments to 
beneficiaries began at that date. Since then, numbers assisted under the law 
have steadily increased until at the close of this fiscal year ending November 30, 
1935, there are 25,303 enrolled. No month since the start has shown a less num- 
ber than the preceding month so that it is evident that the peak has not as yet 
been reached. Any legislation tending to liberalize the requirements of this law 
is reflected by an increase in numbers. This is true with the change relative to 
required residence as found in the amended law when the twenty-year clause was 
dropped and residential requirement compatible with the Federal law was written 
into the Massachusetts law. The present law, in so far as this change is con- 
cerned, reads as follows: 

Chapter 118A. — Adequate Assistance To Certain Aged Persons 
Section 1. (As amended by Acts of 1933, Chapters 219 and 328 and Acts 
of 1935, Chapter 494.) 

Adequate assistance to deserving citizens in need of relief and support 
seventy years of age or over who shall have resided in the commonwealth not 
less than five years during the nine years immediately preceding the date of 
application for such assistance and who shall have resided in the common- 
wealth continuously for one year immediately preceding said date of applica- 
tion, shall be granted under the supervision of the department of public wel- 
fare, in this chapter called the department. Financial assistance granted 
hereunder shall be given from the date of application therefor, but in no 
event before the applicant reaches the age of seventy, and in determining 
the amount of assistance to be given for any period preceding the date on 
which the application was favorably passed upon, consideration shall be 
given to the amount of welfare relief, if any, given to such applicant during 



16 P.D. 17. 

said period under any other provision of law. Such assistance shall, wherever 
practicable, be given to the aged person in his own home or in lodgings or in a 
boarding home, and it shall be suilicient to provide such suitable and digni- 
fied care. 

No person receiving assistance hereunder shall be deemed to be a pauper 
by reason thereof. 

There has naturally been some discussion over that phrase in the law which 
reads: "... and who shall have resided in the commonwealth continuously for 
one year immediately preceding said date of application. . . ." As this is a 
direct copy of the Federal law and as yet no ruling as to exactly what is meant by 
4 'continuously" has been made by the Federal Social Security Board, the defini- 
tion of "continuously" as "without a break" must govern in all applications. 
When the Federal board passes on this and makes, as it may, due allowance for 
short absences from the Commonwealth, such ruling will of course apply to all 
applicants in Massachusetts. 

With the change in the law also have come changes in the policies governing the 
law. The amended policy No. 2, Eligibility, is as follows: 

2. Eligibility. The law is designed to better the condition of "deserving 
citizens in need of relief, seventy years of age or over." In determining who 
are to be considered "undeserving" by reason of being deserters, non-sup- 
porters, confirmed alcoholics, drug addicts or chronic offenders against the 
laws of the Commonwealth, a past record is of less importance than present 
habits. If there is a question whether the applicant, is deserving, he should 
be given the benefit of the doubt. 

The amended policy No. 5, Medical Social Service, is as follows: 

5. Medical Social Service. As soon as practicable, but not as an abso- 
lute prerequisite to giving financial assistance, the visitor should secure the 
opinion of the family physician about the aged person's needs. If there is no 
family physician, an interested physician should be secured to understand 
those needs and to recommend to the visitor a course of procedure. As clinics 
for special diseases, chronic hospitals and other medical resources become 
available, the visitors should make the fullest possible use of them. 

For the person whose family ties have been entirely broken, there is a 
great feeling of security and companionship in a good home for the aged. 
Persons already in institutions should not be removed therefrom without good 
medical advice. Physical handicaps, such as deafness, blindness, crippling dis- 
eases, should be carefully considered. Reimbursement for hospital expenses 
of recipients of Old Age Assistance who become acutely ill will be approved on 
the basis of a weekly rate not exceeding ten dollars and fifty cents. This law 
does not provide for the expenses of support in city or town infirmaries. In 
exceptional cases, where the local board of public welfare on its own initiative 
decides that it is best for an aged person to be boarded in a private charitable 
home, such arrangements will be approved by the Department. 

Any attempt on the part of a private institution to secure this assistance 
generally for its residents should be disapproved. 

As was discussed in a former report, the most difficult problems in ad- 
ministration are still property and liability of children to support. If appli- 
cants would only realize that it is by far the wiser plan to leave property holdings, 
bank accounts and insurance in status quo and let such matters be passed upon at 
the time of application, it would accrue to their benefit and make acceptance of 
applications more expeditious. Transfers of real estate to friends or relatives at 
a date just prior to application always complicate the issue and usually have the 
effect of a denial on the part of the local board or the department until a readjust- 
ment can be made. The same is true in bank accounts and insurance policies. The 
Massachusetts law always has been liberal in the matter of equities allowed in 
real estate and, as at present, additional funds in personal property are allowed. 
But, it is not fair for an applicant to dispose of property for the purpose of 
obtaining Old Age Assistance or to give to others real estate or funds at or immedi- 
ately preceding the date of application. 



Pt. I. 17 

The table found below shows the steady increase in cases enrolled as recorded 
from month to month: 

Active cases under Old Age Assistance as of : 



1934 




1935 




December 1 


. 20,320 


June 1 


. 22,221 


1935 




July 1 


. 22,661 


January 1 


. 20,517 


August 1 


. 22,983 


February 1 


. 20,838 


September 1 


. 23,448 


March 1 


. 21,181 


October 1 


. 24,117 


April 1 


. 21,473 


November 1 


. 24,708 


May 1 


. 21,858 







Average number of active cases each month . . . 22,094. 

An interesting survey, conducted by the bureau's head social worker, was made 
as of March 1, 1935, and considered the then number of 20,928 cases from various 
angles such as age, sex, housing, physical conditions, and property ownership. 
This survey is as follows : 



Total number of active cases under 


Old Age Assistance 


as of March 1, 1935 


20,928 


Males .... 


9,602—45.9% 


Females 




11,326—54.1% 


Age Groups: 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Per cent 
of Total 


Ages 70-74 
75-79 
80-84 
85-89 
90-95 
95-100 . 


3,668 

3,750 

1,590 

505 

81 

8 


4,194 

4,388 

1,919 

624 

167 

34 


7,862 
8,138 
3,509 
1,129 
248 
42 


37.6 

38.9 

16.8 

5.4 

1.2 

.1 




9,602 


11,326 


20,928 




How Living: 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Per cent 
of Total 


Alone .... 
With husband or wife 
With children . 
In room — lodging house 
In convalescent home 
With friend — other relatives 
With parent 


1,011 
3,341 
2,267 
1,269 
133 
1,580 
1 


1,888 
1,667 
4,000 
951 
269 
2,551 


2,899 
5,008 
6,267 
2,220 
402 
4,131 
1 


13.9 
23.9 
29.9 
10.6 
1.9 
19.7 




9,602 


11,326 


20,928 


- 


Condition: 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Per cent 
of Total 


Confined to bed or house . 
Able to get about 


1,242 
8,360 


2,649 
8,677 


3,891 
17,037 


18.5 
81.5 




9,602 


11,326 


20,928 


- 


Property: 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Percent 
of Total 


Real Estate . 

Bank account — stocks, bonds 

Insurance . 


1,427 
1,509 
3,531 


1,399 
2,630 
5,265 


2,826 
4,139 
8,796 


13.5 

19.7 
42.0 



The returns from cities and towns as to applications and the disposition of the 
same is below: 



Returns from Cities and Towns — for 1934 



Total appli cations received 

Accepted 

Refused 

Pending 



10,542 

6,121 

3,516 

905 



Reasons for Refusal 



Not deserving 160 

Not citizens ...... 170 

Not 70 years of age . . . . 229 

Not a Massachusetts resident for 20 years . 454 



Sufficient resources . 
Children able to support 
Withdrew application 
Other reasons . 



752 
580 
211 
960 



18 



P.D. 17. 



Statistics 



On December 1, 1934, there were 20,320 active cases receiving Old Age Assist- 
ance. During the year 9,649 new cases were aided and 4,666 cases closed, so that 
there were 25,303 cases receiving Old Age Assistance at the close of the fiscal 
year, November 30, 1935. 

The new cases were classified as follows : 



New Cases 
Settled Unsettled 


Reopened 
Settled 


Cases 
Unsettled 


Total 


Male 
Female . 


3,294 
3,920 


247 
322 


741 
925 


84 
116 


4,366 
5,283 


Total 


7,214 


569 


1,666 


200 


9,649 


Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Separated 

Deserted 


883 

2,590 

3,487 

95 

112 

47 


83 

139 

295 

16 

28 

8 


155 

471 

967 

23 

39 

11 


13 

57 

114 

10 

3 

3 


1,134 

3,257 

4,863 

144 

182 

69 


Total 


7,214 


569 


1,666 


200 


9,649 



Reasons for Opening: 
Moved from other towns .... 

Proved eligible 

Resources depleted ..... 
Returned from visits to other places 
Left hospitals or other institutions . . 

Children or relatives no longer able to provide 
Other forms of aid discontinued . 



Reasons for Closing: 
Deceased ..... 
Moved to other towns 
Sufficient resources 
Children or relatives to provide . 
Admitted to hospitals or institutions 
Not deserving 

Required residence not proved 
Not citizens .... 
Required age of seventy not proved 

Left state 

Excess property .... 
Transferred to other forms of relief 
Notices from wrong city or town 
Not living on own property . 



Pt. I. 



19 



The active Old Age Assistance 


cases as 


of November 30, 1935, are as folio 


Abington . 


78 


Edgartown 


24 


Medford 


269 


Scituate . 


Acton 


17 


Egremont 


10 


Medway . 


29 


Seekonk . 


Acushnet . 


17 


Enfield . 


7 


Melrose 


140 


Sharon 


Adams 


47 


Erving 


10 


Mendon . 


3 


Sheffield . 


Agawam . 


35 


Essex 


16 


Merrimac 


31 


Shelburne 


Alford 


3 


Everett . 


244 


Methuen . 


149 


Sherborn . 


Amesbury 


105 


Fairhaven 


83 


Middleborough 


120 


Shirley . 


Amherst . 


48 


Fall River 


782 


Middlefield 


1 


Shrewsbury 


Andover . 


67 


Falmouth 


31 


Middletbn 


24 


Shutesbury 


Arlington 


100 


Fitchburg 


158 


Milford . 


94 


Somerset . 


Ashburnham 


14 


Florida . 





Millbury . 


50 


SOMERVILLE 


Ashby . 


11 


Foxboro . 


43 


Millis 


16 


South Hadley . 


Ashfield . 


6 


Framingham 


143 


Millville . 


15 


Southampton 


Ashland . 


11 


Franklin . 


33 


Milton 


44 


Southborough . 


Athol 


92 


Freetown 


23 


Monroe . 


2 


South bridge 
Soiithwick 


Attleboro 


136 


Gardner 


102 


Monson . 


30 


Auburn . 


37 


Gay Head 


4 


Montague 


55 


Spencer . 


Avon 


30 


Georgetown 


23 


Monterey 


4 


Springfield 


Ayer 


26 


Gill 


6 


Montgomery 


1 


Sterling . 


Barnstable 


59 


Gloucester 


166 


Mt. Washingtoi 


l 


Stockbridge 


Barre 


19 


Goshen . 


1 


Nahant . 


16 


Stoneham 


Becket 


3 


Gosnold . 





Nantucket 


46 


Stoughton 


Bedford . 


12 


Grafton . 


43 


Natick ' 


88 


Stow 


Belchertown 


24 


Granby . 


3 


Needham 


51 


Sturbridge 


Bellingham 


17 


Granville 





New Ashford 


1 


Sudbury . 


Belmont . 


45 


Gt. Barrington 


45 


New Bedford 


996 


Sunderland 


Berkley . 


10 


Greenfield 


107 


New Braintree 


1 


Sutton 


Berlin 


11 


Greenwich 


1 


New Marlborou 


gh 12 


Swampscott 


Bernardston 


10 


Groton 


22 


New Salem 


7 


Swansea . 


Beverly . 


118 


Groveland 


26 


Newbury 


28 


Taunton 


Billerica . 


54 


Hadley 


12 


Newburyport 


139 


Templeton 


Blackstone 


22 


Halifax . 


8 


Newton . 


212 


Tewksbury 


Blandford 


5 


Hamilton 


15 


Norfolk . 


5 


Tisbury . 


Bolton 


9 


Hampden 


9 


North Adams 


164 


Tolland . 


Boston . 


4,289 


Hancock . 


7 


No. Andover 


43 


Topsfield . 


Bourne 


48 


Hanover . 


35 


No. Attleboroui 


h 55 


Townsend 


Boxborough 





Hanson . 


37 


No. Brookfield 


27 


Truro 


Boxford . 


3 


Hardwick 


6 


No. Reading 


13 


Tyngsborough . 


Boylston . 


4 


Harvard . 


7 


Northampton 


120 


Tyringham 


Braintree 


140 


Harwich . 


17 


Northborough 


25 


Upton 


Brewster . 


16 


Hatfield . 


4 


Northbridge 


29 


Uxbridge . 


Bridgewater 


34 


Haverhill 


468 


Northfield 


18 


Wakefield 


Brimfield . 


6 


Hawley . 


2 


Norton 


29 


Wales 


Brockton 


536 


Heath 


3 


Norwell . 


27 


Walpole . 


Brookfield 


15 


Hingham 


53 


Norwood . 


33 


Waltham 


Brookline 


170 


Hinsdale . 


18 


Oak Bluffs 


15 


Ware 


Buckland 


10 


Holbrook 


43 


Oakham . 


1 


Wareham 


Burlington 


17 


Holden 


12 


Orange 


71 


Warren . 


Cambridge 


456 


Holland . 


4 


Orleans 


13 


Warwick . 


Canton . 


47 


Holliston . 


40 


Otis 


12 


Washington 


Carlisle . 


7 


HOLYOKE 


201 


Oxford . 


36 


Watertown 


Carver 


10 


Hopedale 


11 


Palmer 


24 


Wayland . 


Charlemont 


2 


Hopkinton 


31 


Paxton 


2 


Webster . 


Charlton . 


15 


Hubbardston 


14 


Peabody . 


114 


Wellesley 


Chatham . 


28 


Hudson . 


44 


Pelham . 


16 


Wellfleet . 


Chelmsford 


56 


Hull 


10 


Pembroke 


16 


Wendell . 


Chelsea . 


178 


Huntington 


3 


Pepperell 


21 


Wenham . 


Cheshire . 


23 


Ipswich . 


38 


Peru 





W. Boylston 


Chester . 


7 


Kingston . 


26 


Petersham 


11 


W. Bridgewater 


Chesterfield 


11 


Lakeville . 


16 


Phillipston 


4 


W. Brookfield . 


Chicopee . 


116 


Lancaster 


17 


PlTTSFIELD 


285 


W. Newbury 


Chilmark 


6 


Lanesborough 


11 


Plainfield 


7 


W. Springfield . 


Clarksburg 


11 


Lawrence 


385 


Plainville 


14 


W. Stockbridge 


Clinton . 


74 


Lee 


39 


Plymouth 


123 


W. Tisbury 


Cohasset . 


22 


Leicester . 


29 


Plympton 


7 


Westborough . 


Colrain . 


6 


Lenox 


14 


Prescott . 





Westfield 


Concord . 


26 


Leominster 


176 


Princeton 


3 


Westford . 


Conway . 


10 


Leverett . 


16 


Provincetown 


32 


Westhampton . 


Cummington . 


7 


Lexington 


31 


Quincy . 


430 


Westminster 


Dalton 


30 


Leyden . 


3 


Randolph 


87 


Weston . 


Dana 


4 


Lincoln . 


3 


Raynham 


18 


Westport . 


Danvers , 


85 


Littleton . 


4 


Reading . 


70 


Westwood 


Dartmouth 


56 


Longmeadow 


10 


Rehoboth 


14 


Weymouth 


Dedham . 


55 


Lowell . 


673 


Revere . 


134 


Whately . 


Deerfield . 


16 


Ludlow . 


19 


Richmond 


5 


Whitman 


Dennis 


46 


Lunenburg 


20 


Rochester 


4 


Wilbraham 


Dighton . 


16 


Lynn 


953 


Rockland 


107 


Williamsburg . 


Douglas . 


11 


Lynnfield 


22 


Rockport 


40 


Williamstown . 


Dover 


2 


Malden . 


274 


Rowe 


6 


Wilmington 


Dracut 


34 


Manchester 


23 


Rowley . 


17 


Winchendon 


Dudley . 


6 


Mansfield 


34 


Royalston 


9 


Winchester 


Dunstable 


1 


Marblehead 


118 


Russell 


7 


Windsor . 


Duxbury . 


28 


Marion 


23 


Rutland . 


6 


Winthrop 


E. Bridgewater 
E. Brookfield 


40 


Marlborough 


104 


Salem 


328 


Woburn . 


2 


Marshfield 


20 


Salisbury 


29 


Worcester 


E. Longmeadow 


16 


Mashpee . 


8 


Sandisfield 


8 


Worthington 


Eastham . 


7 


Mattapoisett 


21 


Sandwich 


16 


Wrentham 


Easthampton 


27 


Maynard 


30 


Saugus 


92 


Yarmouth 


Easton 


54 


Medfield . 


20 


Savoy . 


4 





20 



P.D. 17. 



Old Age Assistance Appeal Board 



Under Chapter 285 of the Acts of 1933, which created a Board of Appeal for all 
oases denied assistance under the Old Age Assistance Law, the following action 
was taken in the 272 appeals registered with the Board during the year ending 



November 30, 1935 


* 










o 






Appeals Received, 272 








Approved . 


74 


Denied 


127 


Pittsfield . 
Quincy 


1 

2 


Moved 


1 


Abington . 


2 


Amesbury 


1 


Rockland 


1 


Quincy 


1 


Arlington 


1 


Arlington 


4 


Salem 


3 






Boston 


6 


Avon 


1 


Saugus 


1 


Assistance granted before 


Boxborough 


1 


Barnstable 


1 


Somerset . 


1 


action taken 


bv the 


Brockton . 


3 


Billerica . 


1 


Somerville 


6 


Board of Appeal 48 


Cambridge 


4 


Boston 


18 


Springfield 


2 






Cohasset . 


1 


Braintree . 


1 


Stoneham 


1 


Arlington 


2 


E. Brookfield 


1 


Brockton . 


2 


Swansea . 


1 


Bernardston 




Everett . 


1 


Brookline 


1 


Taunton . 


1 


Billerica . 




Fall River 


3 


Cambridge 


4 


Wakefield 


] 


Boston 


17 


Foxborough 


1 


Chelsea . 


1 


Waltham 


1 


Brookline 




Gloucester 


3 


Chicopee . 


2 


Watertown 


2 


Chelmsford 




Haverhill 


3 


Concord . 


1 


Wellesley 


1 


Dennis 




Lawrence 


1 


Fall River 


9 


Westborough 


1 


E. Bridgewater 




Lynn 


3 


Fitchburg 


1 


Westport . 


1 


Fall River 




Maiden . 


4 


Foxborough 


2 


Weymouth 


2 


Framingham 




Methuen . 


1 


Georgetown 


1 


Winthrop 


2 


Gloucester 




Natick 


2 


Gloucester 


2 


Worcester 


8 


Haverhill 




Needham 


1 


Harwich . 


2 






Holyoke . 




New Bedford 


1 


Haverhill 


5 


Pending . 


13 


Ipswich . 




Newburyport 


1 


Heath 


1 






Lynn 




Newton . 


2 


Hudson . 


1 


Boston 


2 


Medford . 


2 


North Reading 


1 


Holyoke . 


1 


Cambridge 


1 


Plymouth 


1 


Norwell . 


2 


Ipswich . 


1 


Fall River 


1 


Somerville 


4 


Pittsfield . 


2 


Leominster 


1 


Medford . 


1 


Springfield 


2 


Saugus 


1 


Lowell 


1 


Natick 


2 


Waltham . 


2 


Somerset . 


1 


Lynn 


4 


Norwell . 


1 


Winthrop 


2 


Somerville 


7 


Maiden . 


7 


Oxford . , 


1 






Taunton . 


1 


Mansfield 


1 


Pittsfield . 


1 


Withdrawn 


4 


Uxbridge . 


1 


Medford . 


1 


Somerville 


2 






Waltham . 


2 


Melrose . 


2 


Springfield 


1 


Boston 


1 


Weymouth 


2 


Millville . 


1 






Cambridge 


1 


Winchendon 


1 


New Bedford 


1 


Died 


5 


Melrose . 


1 


Winchester 


2 


Newbury . 


1 






Wendell . 


1 


Winthrop 


1 


Orange 


1 


Boston 


3 






Worcester 


4 


Oxford 


2 


Oxford . 


1 










Peabody . 


1 


Worcester 


1 







DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP 

Miss Winifred A. Keneran,- Director 

Children in Care and Custody of the Division 

The most important function of the Division of Child Guardianship is the care, 
maintenance and supervision in foster homes of dependent, neglected, wayward 
and delinquent children who are wards of the Commonwealth. Other responsi- 
bilities include: The enforcement of the laws for the protection of children; the 
supervision of all infants under two years of age in foster homes and the licensing 
of boarding homes for infants ; the inspection and supervision required in licensing 
maternity hospitals; the investigation of proposed adoptions of children under 
fourteen years of age, referred by the Probate Courts, and the annual visitation 
of all minor children who are placed out and supported at the expense of cities 
and towns. 

On December 1, 1934, there were under care and custody of this Division, 
7,298 children, classified as: delinquent, 242; wayward, 8; neglected, 3,589, and 
dependent, 3,459. During the following twelve-months period w T e received 1,387 
children, viz.: delinquent, 166; wayward, 4; neglected, 751, and dependent, 466. 
The total number of children under care was, therefore, 8,685, an increase of 421, 
or 5 per cent, as compared with the number under care the previous year. Nine 
hundred eighty- two (982) were discharged, classified as: delinquent, 140; way- 
ward, 5; neglected, 457, and dependent, 380. It follows, therefore, that 7,703* 

1 In addition to these 7,703 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1935, 351 boys at the Lyman School for Boys; 257 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 305 boys at 
the Industrial School for Boys; 2,426 boys and 571 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Training Schools, outside the schools; 155 boys and 138 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospital 
School; and 188 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their mothers 
or else under hospital treatment, making a total of 12,094 children in the care and custody or under the 
supervision of the department. There were also 2,002 children supported at the expense of cities and towns 
who were subject to the department's visitation, reported upon at page 61. 



Pt. I. 21 

children remained in custody on November 30, 1935, viz.: delinquent, 268; way- 
ward, 7; neglected, 3,883, and dependent, 3,545. 

Only 95 of the entire number of children under care are foreign born, the 
majority (66) being natives of Canada. Two (2) were born in South America, 
1 came from China, and 26 others from several European countries. 

Three thousand two hundred twenty-eight (3,228), or 41 per cent, have one or 
both foreign-born parents. 

Illegitimate children number 2,149, or 27.8 per cent of our entire population. 

Two hundred ninety-eight (298) are full orphans and 1,807 other children have 
but one living parent. 

Six thousand eight hundred (6,800) of the 7,703 children under care are placed 
in foster homes under the following conditions: 5,846 are fully supported; 218 are 
furnished clothing only; 312 are placed without expense, and 424 (325 girls and 
99 boys) are self-supporting. 

In addition, 253 are placed with parents and 128 with other relatives subject 
to visitation and supervision; 303 are receiving care and treatment in hospitals; 
16 boys are in the United States Service and 114 are employed in the Civilian 
Conservation Corps. Two (2) boys and 30 girls have married and established 
their own homes. 

Children in custody of the Division are divided into five groups: (1) Children 
under three years; (2) boys and girls from three to twelve years of age; (3) girls 
between the ages of twelve and twenty-one years; (4) boys of similar ages, and 
(5) mentally deficient children of all ages. 

Children Under Three Years. 

Children under three years of age at the beginning of the year numbered 438. 
Three hundred twenty (320) were received, making the total number under care 
during the year, 758. Included in the number received are 4 foundlings who 
were committed under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 22, 
and 4 infants removed from unsuitable homes, under the provisions of section 28 
of the same chapter. Sixty-five (65) were discharged from custody and 222, 
having reached the age of three years, were transferred to the subdivision for 
older children, 471 infants remaining under care. 

The children in this group are under the supervision of five registered nurses. 
The frequent visitation of the nurses and the devotion and unselfishness of the 
carefully selected foster mothers, who are experienced in the care of babies, are 
responsible for saving the lives of many infants who come to us in poor physical 
condition. The mortality rate for this group is the lowest we have ever reported. 





Mortality Rate in Detail 








Under Care 


Died 


Rate 


Birth to one year . 


89 


6 


6.74% 


One year to two years 


205 


1 


•48% 


Two years to three years 


464 





.00% 



758 7 .92% 

Two (2) of the infants reported in the above table died at the State Infirmary, 

2 at Bradford Infirmary, 2 in local hospitals, and 1 in a foster home. 

The following table shows the rate of mortality among infants under three years, 

also under one year, for the past ten-year period : 

















Under One 


Year 


Under 


Three 


Yeabs 




Total 


Died 


Percentage 


Total 


Died 


Percentage 


1926 


110 


5 


4.5 


637 


16 


2.5 


1927 














131 


8 


6.1 


531 


6 


2.1 


1928 














86 


9 


10.4 


645 


18 


2.8 


1929 














97 


11 


11.3 


719 


21 


2.9 


1930 














195 


8 


4.1 


802 


17 


2.1 


1931 














92 


3 


3.3 


802 


8 


0.99 


1932 














102 


5 


4.9 


852 


12 


1.4 


1933 














70 


6 


8.57 


779 


9 


1.15 


1934 














101 


4 


3.96 


734 


7 


0.95 


1935 














89 


6 


6.74 


758 


7 


0.92 



22 P.D. 17. 

Children from Three to Twelve Years: 

There are 3,359 children between the ages of three and twelve under the super- 
vision of twenty- two social workers. 

Physical examination given every child upon reception shows that fully seventy- 
five per cent of those received are in need of medical or hospital care and treatment. 
The urgent cases are placed at Bradford Infirmary. Chronic cases which cannot 
be cared for elsewhere are sent to the State Infirmary. Others are placed in foster 
homes (temporary) and taken to local hospitals and clinics or oculists or dentists, 
as required. When defects are corrected the child is placed in a foster home under 
care of a visitor who aims to give every child in her care the attention which will 
insure perfect health and the happiness to which he is entitled. To this end, 
visitors to all children in every group accompany them to clinics for necessary 
check-up and advice. 

One of the difficulties which confronts a visitor of this younger group is the 
finding of suitable foster homes in which members of one family may be kept 
together, according to our policy. There is a tendency among applicants to 
request one or two superior children to board and rarely today do we find homes 
for a larger number. 

Last year we received 40 families of four children each, 20 families of five chil- 
dren, 13 of six children, 6 of seven children, 1 of eight and 3 of nine children. This 
shows a total of 415 children representing 83 families. 

The number of problem children for whom we must provide seems to be con- 
stantly increasing. The placing of many of these children with any prospect of 
permanency has been found to be almost impossible. Many of them are psychotic 
and no other provision has yet been made for their care, although the erection of 
a hospital for children so afflicted has recently been recommended. We hope that 
our children who need this care and protection will be given opportunity when 
the building is erected. 

Before the close of the year we were permitted to appoint and assign two addi- 
tional junior social workers to this group. This enabled us to lessen the heavy 
case-load which the visitors had been obliged to carry and to give them an oppor- 
tunity for more intensive work with their children and foster mothers. 

Older Girls: 

There are 1,550 girls between the ages of twelve and twenty-one years, the 
majority of whom are normal, self-respecting young women who take their places 
in the schools and communities with girls more fortunately situated. Seventeen 
(17) social workers supervise this group of girls. They are confronted with the 
same problems in relation to their charges as are the parents of girls of the same 
ages living in their own homes, and much tact and patience is necessary in guiding 
their courses. Eleven hundred thirty-one (1,131) of the girls are attending school, 
354 of them having reached high school. Seven (7) others are studying at trade 
schools, 3 attend business schools, and 4 girls are students at colleges. Twelve 
(12) girls are receiving nurses' training. Two hundred thirty-six (236) of the 
282 who are self-supporting are engaged in housework. The remainder are em- 
ployed in stores, restaurants, beauty parlors, mills and factories, or as nurse-maids 
and attendants. 

Older Boys: 

In the corresponding group of boys, the population is 1,887 — under the guid- 
ance of fifteen men visitors whose duty it is to supervise them in foster homes and 
find suitable employment for them. In addition, these agents attend each session 
of the juvenile courts when cases charging neglect and delinquency are presented 
for trial. In a few courts where no women probation officers are employed our 
women visitors act in a similar capacity. 

Approximately two- thirds of the 1,887 older boys are attending schools. High 
school pupils number 305; 2 attend college; 1, business college; 2, evening school, 
and 3, continuation school. Five (5) boys completed the course at the Wayside 
Inn Boys School last June. Three (3) others are studying agriculture elsewhere. 

The Wayside Inn Boys School at Sudbury was originally established as a 
Trade School by Henry Ford in March, 1928, and was opened to thirty wards of 



Pt. I. 23 

this Division. In January, 1932, the policy of the school was changed and from 
that time agriculture, instead of mechanics, has been stressed. To date, 127 of 
our boys have been enrolled as students. Thirty-nine (39) boys have completed 
the course and there are at present 27 under-graduates from this Division. 

Fifty-five (55) boys, of the total of 254 who are self-supporting, are placed on 
farms; 33 are employed in mills or factories and 4 in stores. There are 16 boys 
in the service of the Army and Navy. The Civilian Conservation Corps has 
proved of great assistance to us in the support of 114 boys seventeen years of age 
and older, and of inestimable value to the boys themselves. The remaining num- 
ber are engaged in various kinds of unskilled labor. 

Mentally Deficient Children: 

During the past year, 403 cases of mentally deficient children were carried by 
the two social workers assigned to this work. This group included the idiot, 
imbecile and moron types. 

Community placement for a child of the low level of intelligence of an idiot is 
rarely successful, and every effort is made to have him accepted by one of the 
state schools for the feeble-minded. Forty-one (41) such children are now at the 
State Infirmary, and 10 were committed from that institution to state schools 
this past year. Eleven (11) children, with physical as well as mental handicaps, 
are boarded at the Hospital Cottages for Children at Baldwinville, awaiting com- 
mitment to state schools. Seventeen (17) who are feeble-minded epileptics are 
at the Monson State Hospital. 

The imbecile and moron group consists of 226 children, and they are divided 
into two main groups: children boarded in special foster homes and wage earners. 

The children boarded in special foster homes range in age from three to twenty 
years. The children under sixteen years of age attend special classes for retarded 
children in the public schools, while some display considerable ability in accom- 
plishing the work of grades from one to five. 

There are 25 girls in the wage earners' group. After a period of training, em- 
ployment is secured as mothers' helpers, general house-work girls, and occasionally 
factory workers. At present one boy is employed in a bleachery, entirely self- 
supporting, and several others are working part-time in upholstery shops and 
factories. 

During the year 64 children of this group were committed to the three state 
schools for the feeble-minded. 

Subdivision of Investigation 

The Subdivision of Investigation is primarily concerned with the reception of 
dependent children, under the provisions of two sections of chapter 119 of the 
General Laws. 

Under section 22 of chapter 119 of the General Laws, the boards of public wel- 
fare are asked to commit to this Department all cases of foundlings, abandoned 
children and orphans with no settlement or insufficient data to establish a legal 
claim. In cases of deportation the same section is often used so that the Depart- 
ment will have proper custody. This section also gives the Department custody 
and control of children whose parents have been committed to state hospitals for 
the insane or other institutions for the mentally unfit. Children who are com- 
mitted because of orphanage are in most cases illegitimate children whose mothers 
have died. There are a few cases of legitimate children whose fathers have been 
deserters for a long period and whose mothers have died. During the past year 
there were 104 such commitments: abandoned, 42; foundlings, 4; orphans, 20; 
mother insane, 36, and mother deported, 2. 

Under section 38 of chapter 119, dependent children may be committed upon 
the written application of the parent or guardian or of the board of public welfare 
if the child has a legal settlement. Thus an orphan with no settlement would be 
committed under section 22 and one with a settlement would be committed under 
section 38. In all settled cases the town or city of settlement must agree to pay 
for support. The children received under this section may be classified as follows: 



24 P.D. 17. 



Mother insane or feeble- 




Parents separated . 


30 


minded .... 


45 


Mother deserted 


16 


Mother dead .... 


62 


Orphan .... 


4 


Mother physically incapaci- 




Child in need of special care 


29 


tated 


45 


Very young mother . 


5 


Mother low grade mentally 


51 






Mother under organized super- 








vision . 


71 




■ 


Total .... 






358 



It is very difficult to limit the cause of reception to one reason. Neither illegiti- 
macy nor poverty alone is ever the principal cause. It will be noted that there 
are five instances of very young mothers. There are more of these young mothers 
in the group "Mother under organized supervision," but in these five cases home 
and local conditions made it seem wise to allow the mother to remain in her own 
home guarded by wise and understanding parents. 

The annual evaluation of all dependent cases is proving very helpful in several 
ways. For the past three years, in order to have a complete picture of the record 
easily available, we have been entering on the family history a brief summary of 
the case at the time of reception. A year later the case is restudied and again 
summarized. The contact between the parents and the Division is strengthened 
and the social history is much more valuable. One practical result is the rehabili- 
tation and reestablishment of responsibility. The statistics show that of the cases 
received in 1933, children in 73 families have been discharged. This involves more 
than 100 children and in many instances is the result of follow-up work by the 
investigator. 

Following are the statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation: 

Children Families 
Applications pending December 1 , 1934 .... 407 276 

Applications received December 1, 1934, to November 30, 

1935 (involving 157 reapplications) .... 1,295 840 



Total 1,702 1,116 

Advised only 28 

Applications withdrawn . 64 

Assumed by relatives ... 483 

Assumed by private agencies 44 

Assumed by public agencies 271 

Children committed Section 22, Chapter 119, General Laws: 

Boys 56 

Girls 44 



100 83 



Foundlings — 3 female, 1 male . 

Children received Section 38, Chapter 119, General Laws: 

Boys ' . . .198 

Girls 160 358 263 

Pending December 1, 1935 354 241 



Total 1,702 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1934 . . 57 
Applications received December 1, 1934, to November 30, 

1935 159 

216 154 

Disposition as follows: — 

Discharged 130 

Refused 6 

Withdrawn 29 

Pending December 1, 1935 51 

Total 216 42 



Pt. I. 25 

After Care 

Cases pending December 1, 1934 . . . 29 

Cases added December 1, 1934, to November 30, 1935 . .52 

Total 81 

Disposition as follows : 

Closed . ' 28 

Investigation leads to discharge 11 

Pending December 1, 1935 42 

Total SI 

General File 

Pending December 1, 1934 11 

Cases added December 1, 1934, to November 30, 1935 40 

Total 51 

Closed 31 

Pending December 1, 1935 20 

Total 51 

Adoption of Our Wards s 
Applications for children for adoption: 

Pending December 1, 1934 17 

New applications . . ... 78 95 

Disapproved without investigation 9 

Withdrawn 21 

Investigated 59 

Pending 6 95 

Homes investigated: 

Approved 47 

Disapproved 12 59 



We are constantly receiving applications for the adoption of children but we 
have been unable to accept many of these applications due to the fact that only 
a comparatively small number of children are eligible for adoption. The family 
history and the child's physical and mental condition are given serious consider- 
ation, and no child is placed for adoption whose background is not made known 
to those seeking a child as a member of their own family. 

Thirty-three (33) children have been placed for adoption during the year. 
Thirty- two (32) children have been legally adopted — 23 girls and 9 boys. The 
oldest child adopted was a boy seventeen years and the youngest a girl eighteen 
months. 

There are now 40 children on trial for adoption. 

Adoption decrees were granted in the following Probate Courts of the Com- 



mon wealth: 

Essex 

Hampden . 
Middlesex . 
Suffolk 
Bristol 


7 
5 
5 
4 
3 


Plymouth . 
Norfolk . 
Barnstable 
Berkshire . 
Franklin . 


3 
2 
1 
1 
1 


Total . 






. 32 



26 P.D. 17. 

No branch of our work is more satisfactory than the adoptions. It means that 
a child who, through no fault of his own has been deprived of a home, has now 
gained security and a permanent place in a family which is genuinely fond of him. 

Investigation of Adoptions 
Referred by the Probate Courts 

When the law was passed for the investigation of adoptions, in the cases of 
children under fourteen years of age, many persons predicted that the number of 
adoptions in this Commonwealth would show a decided decrease because people 
would forego adopting children rather than have public officials inquiring into 
their affairs. Accordingly, a close watch has been kept to see if a decrease in the 
number of petitions for adoption followed our entrance into this new field. 

After four years, it is gratifying to note that instead of the predicted decrease, 
there has been an increase. During the year 1932, 686 investigations were made; 
in 1933 there were 659; in 1934 the number reached 706 and during 1935 the 
total was 760. The increase in the number of petitions for adoption is to our 
minds natural. When the general public realizes that there is little danger in 
adopting a normal child, there will be a greater increase in the number of children 
taken into homes. Experience has proven to organizations engaged in this work 
over a period of years that few well-planned adoptions have resulted in disap- 
pointment. It is readily understood that a child of good parentage and of average 
mental ability, when placed in the home of ordinary people, will grow up to be a 
credit to his new family. But, when the child of parents, either one of whom was 
lacking in mental, physical and moral background, is placed in the home of a 
couple likewise lacking in the same qualities, the chances of success are small. 
Before a child is placed for adoption a thorough study of the parents' background 
should be made, and the child given a physical and mental examination. 

Since one good adoption will do more than anything else to find proper homes 
for other children, it follows that every one interested in the work should endeavor 
at all times to maintain a high standard. Now that it is known that an investi- 
gation is made by the Department of Public Welfare in cases of adoption, there 
is little chance of fraud being perpetrated. At least, the outstanding facts in 
every case are presented to the Probate Courts. Instead of meeting resentment 
on the part of persons seeking to adopt children at the time investigations are 
made, our experience has been that once such persons become acquainted with 
our work they are eager to follow advice. Without doubt there are some who 
have refused to seek children because of investigation, but plenty of excellent 
homes can be found to replace those of persons who resent the existence of the law. 

The increase in the number of adoptions is not limited to the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, as records show that other sections of the United States have 
more adoptions than ever before. A study of the situation reveals that in the past 
decade thirty-nine states have enacted laws governing adoptions, and these laws 
have all tended to take the subject out of the realm of secrecy, doubt, and con- 
fusion. 

In four years there has been a decided improvement in the character of adop- 
tions as a whole. There is, however, one weakness in the system which as yet has 
not been corrected. Some children have been placed under such poor conditions 
that the Probate Courts will not allow the petitions, yet they cannot be removed 
from the homes except in cases of culpable neglect. These situations give us much 
concern but up to the present time there has been no solution of this serious 
problem. 



Distribution of Petitions According to Counties 



Middlesex 

Suffolk 

Essex 

Worcester 

Norfolk 

Hampden 

Bristol 



182 


Plymouth 


155 


Berkshire 


91 


Barnstable 


81 


Franklin 


78 


Hampshire 


49 


Dukes 


47 


Nantucket 



33 
19 
13 
7 
3 
2 




Total 



760 



Pt. I. 27 

Statistics for Year Ending November 30, 1935 

Investigation completed through November 30, 1934 .... 2,362 

Pending November 30, 1934 44 

Notices received from courts, December 1, 1934, to November 30, 1935 760 

Total 3,166 

Investigations completed December 1, 1934, to November 30, 1935 . 729 

For adoption of legitimate children : 

By relatives 202 

By persons other than relatives 65 



For adoption of illegitimate children : 

*By maternal relatives 197 

By "alleged relatives" 19 

By persons other than relatives . • 231 

Withdrawn before investigation 1 

By relative by adoption 1 



267 



449 



For adoption of foundlings ......... 4 

Investigation not required — children over 14 4 

Petitioners removed from State leaving no address .... 1 

Investigation made by private society 4 

(Pending December 1, 1935—74) 

Reported to Court : 

Investigated and approved 662 

Investigated and disapproved 53 

Petitioners agreed to withdraw 5 

720 

Report of investigation not required 9 

Notices received showing disposition by Courts: 

Approved and granted 658 

Approved and dismissed 5 

Disapproved and dismissed 6 

Disapproved and granted . .21 

Withdrawn 1 



691 



(* Of these, 121 petitions were by the mother and her husband.) 



28 



P.D. 17. 



Collections received from Cities and Towns and Directly from Parents 
for the Support of Children 



1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year 





Cities 




Direct 


and 
Towns 


Total 


$12,528 02 


$21,828 07 


$34,356 09 


16,620 52 


24,651 03 


41,271 55 


25,936 02 


28,545 45 


54,481 47 


34,084 65 


44,816 77 


78,901 42 


41,492 42 


57,433 73 


98,926 15 


33,258 83 


62,771 26 


96,030 09 


29,847 30 


62,623 99 


92,471 29 


31,800 51 


83,775 21 


115,575 72 


32,779 61 


77,703 60 


110,483 21 


29,521 11 


88,827 06 


118,348 17 


30,357 82 


112,790 55 


143,148 37 


30,947 17 


119,954 97 


150,902 14 


28,388 42 


134,348 16 


162,736 58 


33,910 17 


133,944 65 


167,854 82 


30,381 87 


147,683 38 


178,065 25 


25,423 50 


153,310 30 


178,733 80 


20,757 32 


149,139 37 


169,896 69 


19,405 28 


180,033 11 


199,438 39 


22,221 81 


186,458 59 


208,680 40 


22,356 11 


181,298 46 


203,654 57 





Dependent 


Neglected 


Grand 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Total 


Number Dec. 1, 1934 

Received Dec. 1, 1934, to Nov. 30, 1935 


165 
117 


159 
95 


324 
212 


56 
50 


58 
58 


114 
108 


438 
320 


Tot;)l number in charge 
Number transferred to subdivision for 
older children .... 
Number discharged and died 


282 

80 
17 


254 

64 
22 


536 

144 
39 


106 

36 
15 


116 

42 
11 


222 . 

78 
26 


758 

222 
65 


Number remaining Dec. 1, 1935 . 


185 


168 


353 


55 


63 


118 


471 



Pt. I. 



29 






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30 P.D. 17. 

Disposition of Children held on Temporary Mittimi, pending further Order of the 

Court 





Pending 

Dec. 1, 

1934 


Received 

During 

the 

Year 


Perma- 
nently 
Com- 
mitted 


Bailed 


Dis- 
charged 

to 
Court 


Pending 

Dec. 1, 

1935 


Neglected .... 
Wayward .... 
Delinquent 


88 
26 


331 

2 

113 


111 
11 


6 
2 


186 

2 

87 


116 
39 


Total .... 


114 


446 


122 


8 


275 


155 



Status of Children in Custody during the Year ending November 80, 1935 



In families, receiving wages 

In families, free of expense to Commonwealth 

In families, clothing only provided . 

In families, board and clothing provided . 

On parole with parents .... 

On parole with other relatives 

In hospitals ...... 

In United States Service 

In Civilian Conservation Corps 

Married ...... 

Whereabouts unknown .... 

Total number in charge Nov. 30, 1935 

Died 

Of age 

Transferred to Lyman School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys . 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls . 
Committed to Reformatory for Women _ . 
Committed to Department of Mental Diseases 

Adopted 

Discharged to places of settlement . 
Otherwise discharged .... 

Total number in custody during the year 



Girls 


Boys 


325 


99 


120 


192 


169 


49 


2,649 


3,197 


81 


172 


48 


80 


145 


158 


— 


16 


— 


114 


30 


2 


16 


41 


3,583 


4,120 


12 


18 


98 


110 


— 


15 


— 


1 


6 


- 


— 


9 


— 


11 


13 


- 


5 


— 


38 


26 


23 


9 


1 


7 


242 


325 



4,021 



4,651 



Applications for Discharge of Children to Relatives 





Pending 


New 




Granted 






Pending 




Dec. 1, 


Applica- 


Granted 


Condi- 


Refused 


With- 


Dec. 1, 




1934 


tions 




tionally 




drawn 


1935 


Neglected 


34 


229 


22 


96 


82 


21 


42 


Wayward 
Delinquent . 


2 
2 


27 


1 


16 


1 

7 


1 


5 


General Laws, 
















(ch. 119, sect. 22) 


2 


24 


11 


5 


5 


— 


5 


General Laws, 
















(ch. 119, sect. 38) 


31 


155 


104 


24 


22 


19 


17 



Total 



71 



435 



138 



141 



117 



41 



Disposition of Delinquent and Wayward Children by the Courts 

Number of court notices received . . . . • • • . • . . . 5,538 

Disposition of cases attended: 
Committed to — 

Lyman School for Boys 144 

Lyman School for Boys and appealed . 22 

Lyman School for Boys and commitment suspended . . . . . . . 315 

Industrial School for Boys 153 

Industrial School for Boys and appealed . 40 

Industrial School for Boys and commitment suspended 355 

Industrial School for Girls 86 

Industrial School for Girls and appealed . 4 

Industrial School for Girls and commitment suspended ....... 60 

Department of Public Welfare 60 

Department of Public Welfare and commitment suspended 

Massachusetts Reformatory r 

Massachusetts Reformatory and appealed ......... 1 

Plummer Farm School. ............ 6 

Plummer Farm School and commitment suspended ....... 5 

County Training Schools ............ 81 

County Training Schools and commitment suspended 46 

House of Correction and sentence suspended ........ 



Pt. I. 31 

Filed 776 

Appealed from finding ............. 49 

Held for Grand Jury 18 

Probation 2,083 

Fined 11 

Fined and appealed .............. 3 

Fined and fine suspended ... .... 14 

Continued ............... 1,546 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare ........ 113 

Failed to appear .............. 72 

Discharged 162 

Dismissed 282 

Total number of cases attended ........... 6,518 

Disposition of Neglected Children by the Courts 

Number of court notices received . . . . . . . . . . .1,210 

Disposition of cases attended: 
Committed to — 

Department of Public Welfare 463 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed ......... 15 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston ......... 55 

Boards of Public Welfare ............ 5 

Placed on File 27 

Discharged ............... 8 

Dismissed ............... 59 

Continued 838 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children ...... 17 

Continued and placed in care of Department of Public Welfare ...... 331 

Failed to appear .............. 10 

Appealed from finding ............. 2 

Total number of cases attended ........... 1,830 



Abington, 2 
Amesbury, 3 
Arlington, 2 
Athol, 2 
Attleboro, 20 
Ayer, 5 
Barnstable, 2 
Belmont, 4 
Beverly, 1 
Boston, 357 
Bridgewater, 1 
Brockton, 7 
Brookline, 4 
Cambridge, 60 
Canton, 1 
Charlton, 1 
Chelsea, 21 
Chicopee, 6 
Clinton, 1 
Concord, 4 
Dan vers, 1 
Dedham, 8 
Everett, 3 
Fall River, 21 
Falmouth, 2 



Localities from which 

Fitchburg, 8 
Framingham, 6 
Franklin, 1 
Gardner, 16 
Gloucester, 7 
Great Barrington, 3 
Greenfield, 8 
Hamilton, 1 
Harwich, 1 
Haverhill, 12 
Hingham, 2 
Holliston, 1 
Holyoke, 18 
Ipswich, 1 
Lawrence, 17 
Lee, 6 
Lowell, 21 
Lynn, 67 
Maiden, 36 
Marion, 1 
Marlborough, 8 
Marshfield, 3 
Medford, 5 
Merrimac, 3 
Milford, 5 



New Children were Received 



Milton, 1 
Montague, 1 
Natick, 4 
Needham, 1 
New Bedford, 21 
Newburyport, 9 
Newton, 7 
North Adams, 8 
Northampton, 21 
North Reading, 2 
Palmer, 4 
Peabody, 13 
Pelham, 4 
Pittsfield, 13 
Plymouth, 6 
Plympton, 1 
Quincy, 51 
Randolph, 1 
Revere, 8 
Salem, 38 
Somerville, 44 
Southborough, 2 
Southbridge, 12 
Springfield, 69 
Stoughton, 8 



Sudbury, 1 
Taunton, 3 
Tewksbury, 71 
Wakefield, 2 
Walpole, 5 
Waltham, 48 
Wareham, 9 
Watertown, 1 
Wayland, 3 
Webster, 1 
Wellesley, 2 
Westfield, 16 
Westborough, 3 
West Springfield, 2 
Winchendon, 10 
Woburn, 10 
Wollaston, 1 
Worcester, 27 
Connecticut, 4 
Maine, 2 

New Hampshire, 6 
New York, 2 

Total, 



1,374 



Licensed Boarding Homes for Infants 

During the last official year 565 licenses to maintain boarding homes for infants 
were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 2, in 103 
cities and towns in addition to the 510 licenses in force at the expiration of the 
previous year; 506 expired by the one-year limitation, 2 were revoked, 77 were 
cancelled, and 490 licenses permitting the boarding of 1,007 infants in 106 towns 
remained in force November 30, 1935. Seventeen (17) applications were with- 
drawn and 11 were refused. 

These represent the licensed homes not only of infants under supervision of the 
Commonwealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out by parents 
and many private agencies. 

The inspector of infant boarding homes made 502 visits during the year, super- 
vising boarding homes and investigating complaints. Four (4) children were 
removed under the provisions of chapter 119, section 28. Five nurses made 9,386 
visits to infants placed in foster homes. This number includes 6,027 visits to our 
infant wards, 1,842 visits to infants boarded privately and by agencies, and 1,517 
visits of inspection and investigation. 



32 P.D. Vt 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of Public 
Welfare from December 1, 1934, to November 80, 1935, under General Laws, 
Chap. 119, Sect. 6, which provides for the Protection of Infants and the 
Licensing and Regulating of Boarding Homes for them. 

SUPERVISION OF 



Avon Home, Cambridge 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton 

Board of Public Welfare, Andover 

Board of Public Welfare, Bellingham 

Board of Public Welfare, Belmont 

Board of Public Welfare, Billerica 

Board of Public Welfare, Bourne 

Board of Public Welfare, Brockton 

Board of Public Welfare, Chelsea 

Board of Public Welfare, Chicopee 

Board of Public Welfare, Danvers 

Board of Public Welfare, Hanover 

Board of Public Welfare, Haverhill 

Board of Public Welfare, Maiden 

Board of Public Welfare, Marshfield 

Board of Public Welfare, Methuen 

Board of Public Welfare, Middleborough 

Board of Public Welfare, Montague 

Board of Public Welfare, New Bedford 

Board of Public Welfare, Newton 

Board of Public Welfare, Orange 

Board of Public Welfare, Pittsfield 

Board of Public Welfare, Quincy 

Board of Public Welfare, Salem . 

Board of Public Welfare, Taunton 

Board of Public Welfare, Wareham 

Board of Public Welfare, Watertown 

Board of Public Welfare, Williamstown 

Board of Public Welfare, Winchendon 

Board of Public Welfare, Worcester 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

Brockton Catholic Charities Centre 

Brockton Family Welfare Society 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston 

Catholic Welfare Bureau of Fall River 

Catholic Welfare Bureau of New Bedford 

Chelsea Ladies' Charitable Association 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 

Child Welfare House, Lynn 

Children's Aid Association, Boston 

Children's Bureau, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Children's Home Society, Augusta, Maine 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston 

Church Home Society, Boston 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Aid and Relief 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Child Guardianship 

Department of Public Welfare, Girl's Parole Branch 

Elizabeth Lund Home, Burlington, Vermont 

Fall River Deaconess Home . 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Lowell 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Swampscott 

Free Synagogue, Child Adoption Committee, New York City 

Girls' Welfare Society, Worcester 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association, Holyoke 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association, Springfield 

Haverhill Children's Aid Society 

Holy Child Guild, Westfield 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 

House of Mercy, Boston . 

Institutions Department, City of Boston 

Jewish Child Welfare Association, Boston 

Jewish Social Service Bureau, Springfield 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Centre 

Lawrence City Mission 

Lowell Catholic Charitable Bureau 

Lutheran Home, Avon 

Lynn Catholic Charities Centre . 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Boston 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Brockton 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Fitchburg 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Greenfield 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Salem 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Taunton 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society . 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 

Northampton Children's. Aid Association 

Private ..»,.... 



k.1. 

•robation Officers ..... 
Reformatory for Women, Framingham 
St. Mary's infant Asylum, Boston 
Salem Catholic Charities Centre 
Sisters of Providence, Holyoke . 
Social Service League, Lowell 
Somerville Catholic Charities Centre . 
Spence Alumni Society, New York City 
State Charities Aid Association, New York City 
Talitha Cumi Home, Boston 
Temporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester 
Veil Hospital, West Chester, Pennsylvania . 
Wachusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg 
William Street Home, Springfield 
Worcester Children's Friend Society . 



33 

15 
13 
64 
30 
84 

7 
10 

1 
37 

4 

6 
14 

2 
15 

2,615 



The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 2,495. 
Of this number 28 died and 126 were adopted. 



Licensed Maternity Hospitals, 1934-1935 
Licenses in force Dec. 1, 1934 (in 93 cities and towns) . 

Expired 

Surrendered and cancelled ...... 

Revoked ......... 



87 
8 



191 



95 



Continuing in force . . . . . . 




96 


Reissues . 


84 




New issues 


9 









93 


Licenses in force Nov. 30, 1935 (in 92 cities and towns) . 




189 


Corporations 


. 135 




Physicians ........ 


20 




Nurses 


24 




Boards of Public Welfare ..... 


2 




Other persons ....... 


8 


18Q 



There were 219 visits to hospitals for inspection and investigation of complaints. 

The returns from the questionnaires mailed to each licensee show 43,971 cases 
delivered; live births, 43,222; still-births, 1,300; deaths of mothers, 201; deaths 
of babies, 1,196. 

The licensee of each hospital is responsible for the use at every birth of either 
the one per cent solution of nitrate of silver furnished by the Department of 
Public Health, or some similar preparation having the approval of the said De- 
partment, for the prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum. 

Each licensee shall be responsible for the observance of chapter 111, sections 
110 and HI of the General Laws relative to diseases of the eyes. 

Four (4) licenses to conduct homes for pregnant women were in force on De- 
cember 1, 1934. One (1) license expired and was reissued. Four (4) licenses 
remained in force November 30, 1935. 



Social Service for Crippled Children 

Miss Margaret MacDonald, Supervisor 
September 1, 1935 

The work of this subdivision continues to be concerned, primarily, with the 
supervision of the annual census of physically handicapped children as called for 
under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 76, section 46A. With the steady 
increase in the number of reports on physically handicapped children from the 
local school boards, it has become necessary, in order to avoid duplication and 
confusion of statistics, to make our calendar year coincide more closely with the 



34 P.D. 17. 

school year. Our report this year, therefore, is from September 1, 1934, to Sep- 
tember 1, 1935. 

The total number of children reported in the census from September 1, 1934, to 
September 1, 1935, was 1,883. Fifty-eight (58) per cent of those reported were 
new cases and 42 per cent were children previously listed in the census on whom 
follow-up reports were made. 

Disabilities of Children Reported 

Nine hundred fifty-two (952) of the reports received concerned crippled chil- 
dren, with infantile paralysis and cerebral palsy continuing to be the chief causes 
of crippling. Other causes, in the order of their incidence, were fractures, con- 
genital deformities, arthritis, bone tuberculosis, osteomyelitis, progressive muscu- 
lar dystrophy, congenital amyotonia, osteogenesis imperfecta, rickets, synovitis, 
hemophilia, and paralysis resulting from such conditions as hydrocephalus, 
meningitis, and encephalitis. 

Rheumatic heart conditions, chorea, and rheumatic fever were the outstanding 
causes of handicaps in the remaining 931 children reported. Other disabilities 
reported in this group were epilepsy, asthma, glandular disturbances, defective 
eyesight or hearing, and encephalitis. There were also an appreciable number of 
children reported who had mental rather than physical defects. 

Education 

Education was provided by the local school department for 1,421 of the chil- 
dren reported — 678 in their homes and 743 in the regular or special classes of the 
public schools. Thirty-nine (39) children were receiving education or training 
in such special schools or institutions as the Massachusetts Hospital School, Berk- 
shire School for Crippled Children, Perkins Institute for the Blind, and the state 
schools for the feeble-minded. 

Four (4) children were under the supervision of the Division of the Blind; 
8 were being educated privately; 3 were of pre-school age; 70 had completed 
their education. Seventy-nine (79) children did not receive home instruction 
during the past year for the following reasons : moved to other parts of the state, 
too ill, being cared for in hospitals, and died. 

Seventy-two (72) children were not in school because of mental rather than 
physical handicaps and 73 physically handicapped children had an additional 
mental handicap which precluded formal education. 

The following recommendations were made for 114 children: care and training 
at schools for crippled children, 8; lip reading, 2; psychometric examinations, 32; 
return to regular public school classes, 7; continuation school classes, 1; transpor- 
tation to school, 3; admission to schools for the feeble-minded, 11; admission to 
Monson State Hospital, 7; admission to Perkins Institute, 1. Forty-two (42) 
children were referred to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Treatment 

Seventy (70) per cent of the children reported in the census have been found to 
be under treatment or to have completed active treatment, and 30 per cent were 
not under medical supervision. Sixty-seven (67) per cent of those receiving treat- 
ment were in their homes being treated either privately or through clinics, and 
3 per cent were in hospitals or institutions. 

In respect to the lack of suitable treatment among children with physical defects, 
our experience is that the situation is very similar to that found in the initial 
state- wide survey of crippled children. 1 While there are some instances of remote- 
ness from available resources for treatment, and others of inability to afford, more 
often it is a matter of failure on the part of parents to appreciate the importance 
of continuity of treatment and to avail themselves of the opportunities at hand 
for assistance in obtaining needed treatment. Some of the more acute problems 
which come to us among the older girls or boys often seem to be a result of this 
failure to take advantage earlier of the facilities for care and training that are 
available. There is need, therefore, for increased efforts to improve the follow-up 
work being done in behalf of these children. 

1 Final Report of the Department of Public Welfare relative to the Number and Care of Crippled Chil- 
dren, 1931. 



Pt. I. 35 

With the steady rise in the number of cases reported, which this year alone 
amounted to an increase of 43 per cent over the previous year, we find ourselves 
greatly handicapped in the matter of giving proper follow-up supervision to those 
cases needing it, because of the lack of an adequate staff in this subdivision. The 
addition of one or two more field workers and clerks would greatly improve the 
service of the division to the communities. 



Tuition of Children under the Care and Control of the Department 

Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, 
as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, governing reimbursements by the 
Commonwealth for tuition and transportation of state wards in public schools, bills 
received from 261 cities and towns, for the tuition and transportation of 4,845 
children amounting to $289,041.95— viz., tuition, $268,212.30, transportation 
$20,829.65 — were audited by the department and paid by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth during the year ending November 30, 1935. The location of the 
children was as follows : 



Abington, 9 
Acton, 8 
Acushnet, 9 
Adams, 2 
Agawam, 4 
Amesbury, 7 
Amherst, 35 
Andover, 11 
Arlington, 31 
Ashfield, 14 
Ashland, 5 
Athol, 19 
Attleboro, 17 
Avon, 1 
Barnstable, 7 
Barre, 7 
Becket, 7 
Bedford, 4 
Belchertown, 30 
Bellingham, 28 
Belmont, 5 
Berkley, 14 
Berlin, 11 
Bernardston, 8 
Beverly, 16 
Billerica, 38 
Bolton, 7 
Boston, 309 
Bourne, 9 
Braintree, 5 
Brewster, 1 
Bridgewater, 18 
Brockton, 41 
Brookfield, 5 
Brookline: 

1934, 1 

1935, 3 
Buckland, 26 
Burlington, 8 
Cambridge, 96 
Canton, 25 
Carlisle, 7 
Carver, 5 
Charlemont, 5 
Charlton, 3 
Chatham, 2 
Chelmsford, 72 
Chelsea, 6 
Cheshire, 3 
Chester, 12 
Chicopee, 19 
Clinton, 38 
Colrain, 11 
Concord, 17 
Conway, 19 
Cummington, 4 
Danvers, 11 
Dedham, 31 
Dennis, 1 
Douglas, 3 
Dover, 1 
Dracut, 19 
Dudley, 1 
Dunstable, 4 
Duxbury, 2 

East Bridgewater, 3 



East Brookfield, 4 
East Longmeadow, 2 
Easthampton, 1 
Easton, 38 
Enfield, 13 
Erving, 6 
Everett, 35 
Fairhaven, 18 
Fall River, 15 
Falmouth, 8 
Fitchburg: 

1934, 1 

1935, 14 
Foxborough, 11 
Framingliam, 80 
Franklin, 35 
Freetown, 5 
Gardner, 1 
Georgetown, 6 
Gill, 2 
Goshen, 1 
Grafton, 11 
Granby, 11 
Granville, 2 
Greenfield, 15 
Groton, 11 
Groveland, 5 
Hadley, 26 
Halifax, 10 
Hampden, 11 
Hard wick, 15 
Harvard, 4 
Harwich, 12 
Hatfield, 2 
Hawley, 36 
Heath, 14 
Hingham, 7 
Hinsdale, 7 
Holbrook, 12 
Holden, 12 
Holliston, 32 
Holyoke, 4 
Hopedale, 19 
Hopkinton, 54 
Hudson, 72 
Huntington, 5 
Kingston, 12 
Lakeville, 8 
Lancaster, 14 
Lawrence, 10 
Lee, 1 

Leicester, 29 
Leominster, 38 
Lexington, 39 
Leyden, 6 
Lincoln, 1 
Lowell, 127 
Ludlow, 11 
Lunenburg, 5 
Lynn, 46 
Lynnfield, 3 
Maiden: 

1934, 57 

1935, 51 
Mansfield, 14 
Marblehead, 5 



Marion, 3 
Marlborough, 159 
Mattapoisett, 8 
Maynard, 5 
Medfield, 1 
Medford, 50 
Medway, 24 
Melrose, 20 
Mendon, 2 
Merrimac: 

1934, 9 

1935, 12 
Methuen, 12 
Middleborough, 10 
Middlefield, 1 
Milford: 

1934, 46 

1935, 42 
Millbury, 12 
Millis, 2 
Milton, 7 
Monson, 15 
Montague, 16 
Natick, 25 
Needham, 7 
New Bedford, 35 
New Braintree, 10 
New Salem, 10 
Newburyport, 2 
Newton, 41 
Norfolk, 2 
North Adams, 3 
North Andover, 7 
North Attleborough, 2 
North Brookfield, 19 
Northampton, 30 
Northborough, 7 
Northbridge, 7 
Norton, 4 

Norwell, 4 
Norwood, 4 
Orange, 6 
Oxford, 20 
Palmer, 45 
Peabody, 11 
Pelham, 19 
Pembroke, 6 
Pepperell, 13 
Petersham, 8 
Phillipston, 2 
Pittsfield: 

1934, 13 

1935, 11 
Plainfield, 15 
Plainville, 1 
Plymouth, 14 
Provincetown, 1 
Quincy, 53 
Randolph, 60 
Raynham, 5 
Reading, 35 
Rehoboth, 3 
Revere, 10 
Rochester, 13 
Rockland, 19 
Rowe, 4 



Royalston, 19 
Russell: 

1932, 1 

1933, 1 

1934, 1 

1935, 2 
Rutland, 7 
Salem, 7 
Salisbury: 

1934, 5 

1935, 3 
Sandwich, 3 
Saugus, 18 
Scituate, 5 
Sharon, 11 
Shelburne, 15 
Sherborn, 5 
Shrewsbury, 20 
Somerset, 14 
Somerville, 105 
South Hadley, 1 
Southampton, 1 
Southborough, 21 
Southwick, 1 
Spencer, 13 
Springfield, 38 
Sterling, 3 
Stoneham, 41 
Stoughton, 43 
Stow, 9 
Sturbridge, 3 
Sudbury, 11 
Sunderland, 1 
Swampscott, 4 
Swansea, 6 
Taunton, 47 
Templeton, 19 
Tewksbury, 6 
Tyngsborough, 18 
Upton, 6 
Uxbridge, 4 
Wakefield: 

1934, 38 

1935, 33 
Wales, 2 
Walpole, 15 
Waltham, 20 
Ware, 75 
Wareham, 44 
Warren, 14 
Washington, 4 
Watertown, 23 
Wayland, 3 
Webster, 6 
Wellesley, 8 
Wellfleet, 1 
Wendell, 3 
West Boylston, 3 
West Bridgewater, 8 
West Brookfield, 7 
West Newbury: 

1934, 5 

1935, 9 

West Springfield, 17 
Westborough, 29 



Winchendon, 23 


Worthington, 1 


Winchester, 20 


Wrentham, 3 


Winthrop, 2 


Yarmouth: 


Wohurn: 


1934, 4 


1934, 126 


1935, 1 


1935, 133 




Worcester, 37 





In the 
Schools 


On 
Parole 


Total 


351 
305 
257 


1,346 

1,151 

572 


1,697 

1,456 

829 



36 P.D. 17. 

Westfield: Westport, 6 

1934, 1 Weymouth, 24 

1935, 11 Whitman, 18 
Westford, 17 Wilbruhiim, 1 
Westhampton, 6 Williamsburg, 20 
Westminster, 17 Williamstown, 1 
Weston, 1 Wilmington, 23 

DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING 

Charles M. Davenport, Director 

Walter C. Bell, Executive Secretary 

(41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston) 

On November 30, 1935, the total number of children who were wards of the 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools was distributed as follows: 

Schools 

Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 

913 3,069 3,982 

The total number in the schools on November 30, 1935, is 67 less than on No- 
vember 30, 1934. 

The Board of Trustees held 13 regular meetings and 4 special meetings during 
the year, in addition to 36 meetings of various committees. A total of 126 sepa- 
rate visits have been made to the three schools by members of the Board of 
Trustees during the year. In addition to these visits made by the trustees, the 
executive secretary of the Board visited the three schools 87 times. 

Boys and girls may be parolled from the training schools at the discretion of 
the trustees. Applications for parole may be made, either in person or by letter, 
to the executive secretary of the trustees, who will see that they are acted upon 
if the boy or girl has been in the training school a reasonable length of time. 

The average length of stay at the three schools was slightly longer in 1935 than 
in 1934. 

Average Length of Stay 

1934 1935 

Lyman School for Boys 13.05 mos. 12.79 mos. 

Industrial School for Boys .... 9.03 mos. 9.38 mos. 

Industrial School for Girls .... 20.40 mos. 20.56 mos. 

Boys' Parole Branch 

C. Frederick Gilmore, Superintendent 

On November 30, 1935, there were 2,497 boys on parole in the care of this 
department, 1,346 of whom were on parole from the Lyman School for Boys and 
1,151 on parole from the Industrial School for Boys. This represents a net loss 
of 97 boys, the same as in 1934. 

From the Lyman School there were paroled to their own homes, or to relatives, 
392 boys; paroled to foster homes at wages, 70; paroled to foster homes, at board, 
118; a total of 580 boys. From the Industrial School for Boys there were paroled 
518 boys; 465 to their own homes, or to relatives, and 53 to foster homes. 

During the fiscal year 327 boys, of the total of 1,965 boys on parole at the Lyman 
School for Boys, were returned to that school — 275 for violation of parole and 52 
for relocation and other purposes. Of the above number, 212 were returned from 
their own homes and 115 were returned from foster homes. During the same 
period 165 boys, of the total of 1,727 boys on parole, were returned to the Indus- 
trial School for Boys — 152 for violation of parole and 13 for relocation and other 
purposes. Of the above number, 138 were returned from their own homes and 27 
from foster homes. 

The supervision of boys on parole in foster homes is most important. It is 



Pt. I. 37 

essential that every boy be placed in a foster home where he will do well. In 
many cases this means trying the boy in several foster homes before finding one 
best suited for him. 

Boys paroled to foster homes are those who have no homes, those whose homes 
are too poor to be considered, and those whose homes, even though good, show 
lack of proper supervision. 

The Trustees granted honorable discharge to 89 boys, 46 of whom were on 
parole from the Lyman School for Boys, and 43 on parole from the Industrial 
School for Boys. These boys had done exceptionally well. 

That some understanding may be had concerning the work at the office of the 
Boys' Parole Branch the following will give some idea of the activities. There 
were 24,651 visits made during the year 1935, — 11,017 to boys on parole from the 
Industrial School for Boys and 13,634 to boys on parole from the Lyman School 
for Boys. There were 1,636 home investigations made, as well as 277 investiga- 
tions of foster homes. To readjust boys, there were 831 relocations made. 

During the year 1935 there have been many withdrawals from the savings 
accounts which represent wages earned by our wards who have been placed in 
foster homes at wages. The wisdom of this savings system, as instituted by the 
Trustees, has been well demonstrated in many instances, as our wards have been 
able to assist their families. In many instances, these families were being aided by 
the Department of Public Welfare of the various communities. 

Girls' Parole Branch 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent 

Seven hundred eighty-five (785) girls and 41 illegitimate babies were supervised 
by the Girls' Parole Branch for a part or the whole of the year, and 572 girls were 
on parole at the end of the year. 

Since 1900, all girls paroled from the Industrial School have come into the care 
of this Department, which, although separated from the school, but closely allied 
to it, takes up their supervision. 

These girls present from year to year much the same problems. One of the 
real achievements of the Girls Parole Branch is that the consideration of these 
same problems are accepted anew each year as a challenge, with fresh determi- 
nation to understand them and to overcome them. Experience has taught us 
that a study of the needs of the individual and treatment based on those needs 
are most essential in dealing with the juvenile delinquent. Each girl is an indi- 
vidual problem, unlike those of all other girls, and all her difficulties must be met 
as such. 

Through the year 132 girls reached their majority; 13 girls were committed or 
transferred to other institutions (Wrentham State School, 2; Foxboro State Hos- 
pital, 1 ; Westborough State Hospital, 2 ; Department for Defective Delinquents, 
5; Reformatory for Women, 3); 1 girl died; and 48 girls were honorably dis- 
charged. 

Parole is the method by which the institution proves its worth. It is a con- 
tinuance of the work of the institution, — the step between restraint and training 
of the institution and the hazardous freedom of a life in the community. In the 
institution the girl is closely protected from the many temptations and upsetting 
influences of the outside. Her experience on parole is full of temptations and her 
stay in the community is based on many but gradual readjustments. It is not an 
easy task to teach her how to accept new responsibilities and how to fit herself 
into new surroundings. When one realizes that 98 per cent of the girls had been 
sex delinquents prior to commitment, and 23 per cent of them had had venereal 
disease, and, while on parole, must be kept under the closest supervision of a hos- 
pital, he must realize that it requires the accumulative experience and skill of the 
entire parole staff to cope with the problems presented from day to day,— and 
even then there are disappointing failures. 

At the close of our fiscal year there were 215 girls on parole with relatives, 
97 girls were married, 154 girls were living in foster families, 16 girls were in hos- 
pitals or convalescent homes, 7 girls were boarding temporarily, and 29 girls were 
temporarily in the House of the Good Shepherd. 



38 P.D. 17. 

Of t ho 572 girls on parole, their mentality was classified as follows: 18 per cent, 
normal ; b'S per cent, dull normal; 16 per cent, borderline and 13 per cent, feeble- 
minded. 

The fitting of these handicapped girls into foster homes is a difficult task. The 
department seeks only those special homes which offer the greatest kindness 
toward and understanding of the once delinquent girl. Two hundred eighty-two 
(282) different girls were in housework positions during the year, and 290 foster 
homes were used 571 times. 

Finding homes where our girls can have the right kind of care is growing more 
and more difficult. Many unsuitable homes are investigated in our effort to find 
the right one. Wages are still very low and the amount and quality of work 
expected are quite out of proportion to the wages paid. 

Two hundred six (206) girls were paroled from the school during the year. Of 
this group 132 were paroled for the first time (average length of stay in the school 
1 year, 8 months, 17 days), and 74 returned girls were paroled. Of this group of 
206 girls, 98 were paroled to foster homes, 91 were paroled to homes of relatives, 
and 17 were paroled to hospitals. 

The visiting staff made 8,021 visits to girls throughout the year. The Depart- 
ment had 7,086 interviews with relatives of our girls, and others interested in them. 
Three hundred thirty-five (335) investigations of girls' homes were made. Visi- 
tors made 1,963 relocations of their girls through the year. 

During the year 1935, 95 girls in the care of the department attended school. 
This is the largest number of girls enrolled in school during any year. Thirty- 
seven (37) girls attended high school; 9 attended junior high school; 29 attended 
grammar school; 3 attended primary or special classes; 3 attended continuation 
school; 2 attended vocational school; 2 attended trade school; 1 attended art 
school and 9 attended business school. 

The young grammar and primary school girls are supported entirely by the 
state. The girls in high school work during the summer months to earn some- 
thing toward their clothes, but, because the wages earned are so small, the depart- 
ment supplements as needed. Many of the girls living at home are partially or 
wholly clothed by the department. It is, however, money well invested as it helps 
to keep the girls happy so that they will continue school. 

Forty-eight (48) girls were honorably discharged through the year. They were 
girls who had maintained themselves on a level of respectability and efficiency. 
Fifteen (15) of these were married. 

The closest supervision of the girls' health is given at all times. During the 
year 1935, 370 individual girls were escorted to hospitals, doctors, and dentists, 
1,385 times; 27 different hospitals were used, and 62 girls were ward patients. 
Our hospital work is increasing each year. 

In 1926 a law was passed to establish a Trust Fund with the unclaimed savings 
belonging to wards of the state who had been out of the custody of the Board of 
Trustees for seven years or more. This fund is "for the purpose of securing spe- 
cial training or education for, or otherwise aiding and assisting meritorious wards." 

Eight (8) girls were benefited in 1935 by this fund. Two girls are attending 
business college, 2 girls graduated from business college, one girl took a special 
course in cooking in a well known school, another attended a trade school, still 
another attended a school of art, and one girl specialized in music. Their tuition, 
totaling $550, was paid out of the income of this Trust Fund for Female Wards. 

It is quite important that a girl should learn to face the fact of her dependence 
upon herself, and a bank account is a source of encouragement. The total bank 
savings of 281 girls on November 30, 1935, amounted to $15,004.21. The largest 
account was $362.43. There were 12 accounts between $100 and $200; 3 accounts 
between $200 and $300; and 2 accounts were over $300. On November 30, 1935, 
there were 381 bank accounts amounting to $9,951.65. The cash withdrawn 
through the year by 291 girls amounted to $16,196.10. These withdrawals were 
for clothing, dentists, doctors, board, help at home, traveling expenses, etc. 



Pt. I. 39 

TOWN PLANNING 

Edward T. Hartman, Consultant on Town Planning 

Only one new planning board, in Southborough, and one new zoning law, in 
Dover, may be listed. This last was adopted in 1933. In the meantime in many 
local zoning laws constructive changes and additions have been made or are under 
consideration. There continues to be many changes, in the form of spot zoning 
and undue expansion of existing business areas, which may not be called con- 
structive. 

During the last few years there has been a notable curtailment of activity in 
local planning and zoning, due to cutting down of current appropriations, and 
refusal of appropriations for new work, while in state and national fields the 
greatest expansion in our history has taken place. 

That the people are becoming planning-minded is manifested by the numerous 
inquiries received through office visits and by mail, through much constructive 
newspaper activity, and through "State Planning, a Review of Activities and 
Progress," prepared by the National Resources Committee. 

It is being argued that when building a home, a business building, or an industry, 
a wise man will prepare and follow a plan, that the building may be safe and 
sound, and that functional efficiency may be as nearly perfect as possible. It is 
then asked why such a plan, and the following of such a plan, is not as important, 
even more important, with a thing so dynamic, so vital in the lives of all the people, 
as a city or town ? A city or town, moreover, is not static, not nearly so much so 
as a building. It is expanding, or contracting, or changing. Whatever is happen- 
ing, a purposeful, directed change is safer than what is haphazard. 

Planning Boards 

A planning board has only advisory powers. Many boards have developed 
skill, they propose certain things which should be done, or advise as to how to do 
what is being done, with sound reasons as to when, where and how each thing 
should be done. The board provides for the town the same form of careful think- 
ing which every capable board of directors gives to an industry. 

Failure to use this care is one of the main causes of heavy town expenses. Action 
which is not sound increases the tax rate, depreciates property values, and 
undermines the economic base of the individual citizen and the town. The care- 
ful man, the kind who makes the best citizen, refuses to buy or build a home or an 
industry in a poorly planned, ugly, unprotected, expensive town. 

Whatever a planning board advises, action remains with the town meeting. 
A careful board makes for action along the best lines. A town is safer acting on 
advice than without advice. 

The complaint frequently is made that boards have no power. This complaint 
comes as often from boards which have made no studies and no proposals for im- 
provement as from those which have done much work and whose proposals have 
been turned down. Why should a board which has done no work complain that 
it is ignored? On the other hand, why should a town ignore the recommendations 
of a board which has done careful work? It should be remembered that the 
powers of a board are inherent in the members of the board. When a board is 
able and does sound work, its proposals should be given careful consideration, and 
followed except where better proposals may clearly be proven. When a board 
sees its town as a whole, and makes a conscientious endeavor to develop all parts 
of the town, each in proportion to its needs, and each feature in proper correlation 
with all other features, and when it pursues its work with steadfastness, it will 
gradually achieve its proper position in town affairs. When a board does nothing 
it should not complain, and the people should replace it. 

Zoning 

Protected Residential Districts 
Planners and citizens interested in protected home areas have recognized that 
every element of protection must be provided if an investment in a home is to be 



40 P.D. 17. 

sale. The Federal Housing Administration backs up every element that has been 
proposed by planners and citizens. 

Under the system by which the government insures a mortgage, it refuses to 
insure unless the following conditions exist: — 

1. The house must be properly designed and constructed. 

2. The local street system must be proper. 

3. The local street system must have a property relationship to the street 
system of the town so that there is easy access. 

4. The necessary utilities must be installed or reasonably available. 

5. The area must be zoned, and the zoning must be enforced. 

6. As far as may be needed, private restrictions must be imposed to pro- 
tect the property. 

If the government is not justified in insuring a mortgage except under these 
conditions, what can we say as to the advisability of building or buying a home in 
a town which lacks these elements of protection, or as to the wisdom of a bank in 
loaning money on a mortgage for the construction of such a home? 

Existing Zoning Laws 

From many sources comes the assertion that local zoning laws need revision. 
This seems obvious. What the enabling law permits, what the people desire, is 
not enforceable if it is not covered in the local law. If homes and businesses are 
to be protected, if property values are to be stabilized, the local law must have a 
full equipment of all features so far developed. Does your law contain these fea- 
tures? If it is proposed to use a large house in your best residential area as a 
custodial home for the feeble-minded, if a teacher of the cornet, the saxophone 
and the drums wants to operat e to a late hour at night, if a perfectly proper com- 
munity club building wants to have, or to let space for, all-night dancing, if a man 
wants to remove sod, loam, clay, sand, gravel or quarried stone for sale, have you 
a proper method of regulating these uses, or of preventing them entirely if con- 
ditions are such as to make them dangerous? 

Bulk zoning, arrived at through height and coverage limitations, is an impera- 
tive part of the city plan. Planning is a problem in three dimensions. Either the 
street, water, sewer and utility systems must be designed for an assumed bulk of 
buildings, or the bulk of buildings must be adjusted to the street and other sys- 
tems. If the bulk of buildings, which decides the service demands on the street 
and other systems, is greater than can be served stagnation follows. 

Our mistake lies in that, contrary to the English and European method, we 
have treated what we lay down on the land, what we call the plan, in one com- 
partment of the mind, and what we build on the land, what we call bulk zoning, 
in another compartment of the mind. We do not relate them, as they must be 
related if we are to solve our problems of congestion, traffic hazards, light, venti- 
lation and fire protection. Into a system of streets laid down in the horse and 
buggy days we have injected the skyscraper and the automobile. 

Freeways 

A bill to permit the department of public works to build freeways has been 
filed for consideration this year. A freeway is defined as a way to which no one 
has any right of access except over an intersecting way. It is variously called a 
freeway, a limited way, and a steady-flow way. 

With access to such a way only at properly designed intersections, as widely 
separated as possible, traffic would be expedited, safety would be increased, and 
the natural beauty of the countryside would be protected. 

Economy is obvious. According to the latest accepted figures a four-lane free- 
way will clear from three to four times as much traffic as a four-lane unprotected 
way. A freeway is a speedy, safe and beautiful way of approach to a fine home 
development, reached via an intersecting way. 

The demand of abutters to be allowed to build what they like along our state 
highways is wrong because this kills the traffic-clearing capacity, for which the 
road was built. There is no demand for such space for general business. Were 
all existing Massachusetts state highways solidly developed for business they 



Pt. I. 41 

would meet the needs of 50,000,000 people — and the ways would be killed for 
traffic. General business belongs in the trade centers of cities and towns. 

The hazards of unprotected ways are as obvious as their expense. The economic 
cost of accidents, put at $1,500,000,000 per year by the National Safety Council, 
at $17,870,000 for Massachusetts, is causing widespread alarm. Hitherto the 
annoyance of retardation has been more considered — it is a major item of cost — 
and efforts have been devoted to traffic regulation rather than to planning for 
safety, which is best done through freeways and insulated neighborhood units. 

Planning Board Activities 

Boards Established 



Amesbury 


Concord* 


Leominster 


Amherst* 


Dan vers 


Lexington* 


Andover* 


Dartmouth* 


Longmeadow* 


Arlington 


Dedham 


Lowell 


Ashland* 


Duxbury* 


Lynn 


Attleboro 


Easthampton 


Lynnfield* 


Athol 


East Longmeadow* 


Maiden 


Auburn* 


Everett 


Manchester* 


Barnstable* 


Fairhaven 


Mansfield* 


Bedford* 


Fall River 


Marblehead* 


Belmont 


Falmouth* 


Medfield* 


Beverly 


Fitchburg 


Medford 


Billerica* 


Framingham 


Melrose 


Boston 


Franklin* 


Methuen 


Bourne* 


Gardner 


Middleborough* 


Braintree 


Gloucester 


Milford 


Bridgewater* 


Great Barrington* 


Millis* 


Brockton 


Greenfield 


Milton 


Brookline 


Hanover* 


Natick 


Cambridge 


Haverhill 


Needham 


Canton* 


Hingham* 


New Bedford 


Carlisle* 


Holyoke 
Hudson* 


Newton 


Carver* 


North Adams 


Chicopee 


Hull* 


Northampton 


Clinton 


Lawrence 


No. Attleborough 



Northbridge* 

Norwood 

Oak Bluffs* 

Paxton* 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 

Plymouth 

Quincy 

Randolph* 

Reading* 

Revere 

Salem 

Saugus 

Scituate* 

Sharon* 

Shrewsbury* 

Somerville 

Southborough* 

Southbridge 

Springfield 

Stockbridge* 

Stoneham 

Stoughton* 

Sudbury* 

Swampscott 



Taunton 

Tisbury* 

Wakefield 

Walpole* 

Waltham 

Watertown 

Wayland* 

Webster 

Wellesley 

Westborough* 

West Boylston* 

Westfield 

Weston* 

West Springfield 

Westwood* 

Weymouth 

Wilbraham* 

Wilmington* 

Winchester 

Winthrop 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Yarmouth* 



* Under 10,000 population. 

No Board: Adams, Chelsea, Marlborough, Newburyport. 



42 



P.D. 17. 





Cities and Towns Which Have Been Zoned 


Comprehensive 


Comprehensive — Cont. 


Partial 


Brockton 


Nov., 1920 


Lynnfield 


Nov., 1929 


Marshfield June, 1926 


Brookline 


May, 1922 


Franklin 


Mar., 1930 


Fall River Sept., 1927 


Longmeadow 
Springfield 


July, 1922 
Dec, 1922 


Wilbraham 
Natick 


Feb., 1931 




Mar., 1931 




Newton 


Dec, 1922 


Hull 


Mar., 1931 




West Springfield 


May, 1923 


Westfield 


Aug., 1931 


Prepared but Not Adopted 


Cambridge 


Jan., 1924 
Mar., 1924 


Great Barrington 
Carlisle 


Mar., 1932 
Feb., 1933 




Lexington 




Melrose 


Mar., 1924 


Sharon 


Mar., 1933 


Amesbury 


Winchester 


Mar., 1924 


Dover 


Mar., 1933 


Amherst 


Arlington 


May, 1924 


Wilmington 


July, 1934 


Andover 


Boston 


June, 1924 


Wayland 


Sept., 1934 


Attleboro 


Woburn 


Jan., 1925 
Jan., 1925 






Beverly 


Belmont 






Billerica 


Needham 


Mar., 1925 


Use 




Bourne 


Walpole 


Mar., 1925 
Mar., 1925 






Braintree 


Stoneham 






Canton 


Waltham 


July, 1925 


Milton 


July, 1922 


Chatham 


Haverhill 


Oct., 1925 


Holyoke 


Sept., 1923 


Chelsea 


Medford 


Oct., 1925 


Swampscott 


Apr., 1924 


Chicopee 


Wakefield 


Nov., 1925 


Dedham 


May, 1924 


Clinton 


North Adams 


Dec, 1925 


Chelsea 


June, 1924 


Duxbury 


Somerville 


Dec, 1925 


Paxton 


Dec, 1924 


Easthampton 


New Bedford 


Dec, 1925 


Worcester 


Dec, 1924 


Fitchburg 


Watertown 


Jan., 1926 


Wellesley 


Mar., 1925 


Framingham 


Fairhaven 


Feb., 1926 


Salem 


Nov., 1925 


Gardner 


Falmouth 


Apr., 1926 


Hudson 


Mar., 1927 


Hingham 


Reading 


May, 1926 


Bedford 


Mar., 1928 


Leominster 


Lynn 


June, 1926 


Middleton 


Apr., 1933 


Littleton 


Lowell 


July, 1926 


Stockbridge 


Feb., 1934 


Manchester 


Maiden 


July, 1926 






Marion 


Everett 


July, 1926 






Medfield 


Norwood 


May, 1927 


Interim 




Middleborough 


Gloucester 


Nov., 1927 
Dec, 1927 






Nahant 


Pittsfield 






Northampton 


Marblehead 


Apr., 1928 


Taunton 


Sept., 1925 


North Attleborough 


Weston 


Apr., 1928 


Marlborough 


Jan., 1927 


Plymouth 


Concord 


Apr., 1928 


Andover 


Mar., 1927 


Quincy 


Agawam 


Apr., 1928 


Petersham 


Mar., 1927 


Scituate 


East Longmeadow 


Apr., 1928 


Oak Bluffs 


Apr., 1927 


Shrewsbury 


Saugus 


June, 1928 


Northampton 


Sept., 1927 


Southbridge 


Lincoln 


Mar., 1929 


Barnstable 


June, 1929 


Sudbury 


Westwood 


Mar., 1929 


Attleboro 


May, 1930 


Wenham 


Revere 


July, 1929 


Peabody 


June, 1930 


Westborough 


Winthrop 


Oct., 1929 


Sudbury 


Mar., 1931 


Yarmouth 



STATE BOARD OF HOUSING 

Sidney T. Strickland, Chairman 
J. Fred Beckett Fred J. Lucey 

John Carroll Henry J. Ryan 

During the year the Board has continued its effort to advance the program of 
better housing in all sections of the Commonwealth for those citizens living under 
sub-standard conditions. The program of the Federal Housing Division to work 
in co-operation with the various state housing boards has been accepted by the 
Massachusetts Board in good faith and in every instance where there was the 
slightest possibility of encouraging Federal appropriations, the Board has done 
much to bring Federal funds to Massachusetts. That its efforts have been suc- 
cessful is evidenced in the figures for the fiscal year of 1935, which show Massachu- 
setts to be the recipient of approximately $10,000,000 in Federal funds, $6,000,000 
to the South Boston and $4,000,000 to the Cambridge housing projects, out of a 
total national allocation of $125,000,000. Massachusetts, on the completion of 
the present plans, will receive more than one-twelfth of the 1935 total of the low- 
cost housing appropriation. 

During the year the Legislature, in accordance with the recommendation of this 
Board, enacted legislation providing for the establishment of bodies politic and 
corporate within the several cities and towns of the Commonwealth, to be known 
as "housing authorities," with power to enter upon slum clearance and low-cost 
housing projects. The statute then enacted provided for the receipt by housing 
authorities of aid from the Federal Government in accordance with an act of 



Pt. I. 43 

Congress and the rules and practices of the Federal officers charged with the duty 
of subsidizing housing projects through public corporations created and controlled 
by the states. In the statute enacted last year no provision was made for contri- 
butions by the city or town in which a housing authority was located, except the 
relatively small amount required for organization expenses. Two housing authori- 
ties have been organized under the act. Anticipated direct grants by the Federal 
authorities have not been made, for they have now taken the position that grants 
will not be made to local housing authorities unless the Commonwealth or the 
municipality in which the project is located makes a substantial contribution to 
the cost of the project. 

The Board therefore recommends that the housing authority act enacted (Acts 
of 1935, Chapter 449) he amended so as to authorize cities and towns to raise and 
appropriate money and to pay it over to housing authorities within their respec- 
tive limits in order to assist in the prosecution of slum clearance and low-cost 
housing projects. Such appropriations should be entirely optional with the cities 
and towns, and the amount to be appropriated might be limited to the capitalized 
value of the annual loss sustained by the cities in the maintenance of the sub- 
standard area to be cleared, so that the contribution will constitute no real burden 
upon the taxpayers of the city or town, but will at the same time provide healthier, 
pleasanter and more sanitary dwellings for a large group in the community as well 
as employment for a substantial amount of labor in the building trades. 

In many instances where there is need of slum clearance and low-cost housing, 
the municipal authorities prove unwilling to take the initiative and in each case, 
however great the need, the State Board of Housing under existing legislation is 
without authority to take any steps to relieve the situation. It is recommended 
therefore that in cities and towns in which no housing authority, exists, or in which 
such authority as exists is inactive, the State Board of Housing be authorized to 
proceed with a low-cost housing project, whether it relates to new houses or the 
rehabilitation of sound but obsolete existing structures, and that state funds be 
appropriated to assist in meeting the cost of such projects. 

In connection with the Cambridge housing project, immediately after the pur- 
' chase of the land in November, 1935, by the Federal Government and notices of 
evicting had been sent to the tenants, a survey was started by the State Board of 
Housing in conjunction with B. L. Crandall of the Federal Housing Division to 
determine the relocation of the former residents of the area in Cambridge now 
being developed. The interesting results of this survey are published in the 
Annual Report of the State Board of Housing for the year 1935. 

The Lowell Homestead project, which began in a modest way in 1917, preced- 
ing the more modern ideas as to city, county, state and regional planning, has 
continued this year in an orderly manner. Two more deferred payment pur- 
chasers have made final payments to the Commonwealth and have received clear 
titles to their properties, making a total of six, out of the original number of 
twelve purchasers, who at present have completed their payments. 

During the year it is noteworthy that the State Planning Board has come into 
being, with a comprehensive program of better plans for all local units in their 
future building and construction work. Through the combined efforts of these 
two state boards, cities and towns of the Commonwealth will receive the best 
advice obtainable on their problem of community planning and community hous- 
ing, with prospects of adjusting same to future needs with the whole community 
in mind. 

THE FIVE INSTITUTIONS 

A brief statement relating to the general supervision of each institution will be 
followed by comparative and more detailed consideration of financial administra- 
tion. Further details about the work of the various institutions may be found in 
the institution reports which are published separately. 



44 P.D. 17. 

THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY 

Lawrence K. Kelley, LL.B., M.D., Superintendent 

Trustees 
Mr. Frederick W. Enright, Lynn, Chairman. 
Mr. Charles A. Cronin, Lawrence, Vice-Chairman. 
Mrs. Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham, Secretary. 
Mrs. Theresa V. McDermott, Lowell. 
Mrs. Margaret M. O'Riordan, Boston. 
William F. Maguire, D.M.D., Randolph. 
John J. McNamara, M.D., Lowell. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $3,750,725.46. 
Normal capacity of plant, 3,150. Value per unit of capacity, $1,190.70. 
Provides infirmary care for indigent persons not chargeable for support to any 
city or town. 

Numbers 

Males Females Total 

Number December 1, 1934 1,935 1,003 2,938 

Admitted during year . 2,614 689 3,303 

Discharged during year 2,509 759 3,268 

Remaining November 30, 1935 2,040 933 2,973 

Individuals under care during year .... - - 5,814 

Daily average inmates during year .... 1,907.4 996.6 2,904 

Daily average employees during year . . . . 237.85 296.66 534.11 

Largest census during year ...... - — 3,181 

Smallest census during year - - 2,731 

Records show that during the year 6,241 persons have been cared for, 4,549 
males and 1,692 females, 113 more than the previous year. At the end of the 
fiscal year there were 2,973 persons in the institution, 35 more than the previous 
year. The largest daily census was 3,181 on March, 1935, and the smallest daily 
census was 2,731 on September 3, 1935. There were 580 deaths. 

Of the cases cared for during the year, 6,143 were in the general hospital wards; 
of which 4,707 were males and 1,436 were females. Of this number 942 were dis- 
charged well, 1,183 were improved, 1,038 not improved, 546 died, and 2,434 
remained in the hospital at the end of the year. Of the number cared for in the 
hospital, there were 452 cases of tuberculosis, 327 of alcoholism, 153 of syphilis, 
and 25 infectious or contagious diseases. 

Among the 546 deaths there were 86 due to tuberculosis of the lungs; 53 to 
cancer; 280 to cardiac vascular diseases; 42 to lobar and broncho-pneumonia. 

In the tuberculosis hospitals, the number of patients treated, 637, shows an 
increase of 215 cases over the previous year. Of the number admitted, 447 were 
in the men's department and 170 in the women's department. There were 447 
cases discharged; 111 relieved, 60 not relieved and 86 died — 64 males and 22 
females. Of the extra-pulmonary type of tuberculosis, there were 17 cases as 
follows : 2 of meninges and central nervous system ; 4 of intestines ; 6 of vertebrae 
column; 4 of the genito-urinary system, and 1 of the skin. To the treatment of 
pulmonary tuberculosis which in former years consisted of rest, fresh air and diet, 
the use of artificial pneumothorax has been added. At the end of the year there 
were 35 patients receiving pneumothorax treatment — 24 males and 11 females; 
2 patients receiving bilateral treatment, one male and one female. 

The continued increase in the amount of work performed in the X-ray depart- 
ment has necessitated the appointment of a full time X-ray technician, and the 
appointment of a clerical assistant has aided much in the efficiency of this work. 

A decided increase in the number of admissions to the men's hospital during the 
year is noted, the total number being 2,614. All of these patients required a 
medical history and a thorough physical examination. A large number of male 
patients were sent here for operation and medical observation from the various 
transient center camps throughout the State. Our hospital beds have been filled 
to capacity, and at times extra beds were placed in available space to accommodate 
the continuous incoming of sick and infirm patients. An increase is noted in the 
amount of surgical work done in the men's department; 225 major operations 
were performed and 300 minor operations. 



Pt. I. *5 

In the women's department there was a total of 559 admissions, which, added 
to the 489 at the institution at the beginning of the year, made a total of 1,048 cared 
for; 500 were discharged, 105 died, and 443 remained in the wards at the end of 
the year. In this department there were 49 major and 78 minor operations per- 
formed. 

In the venereal clinic 114 cases of gonorrhea and 78 cases of syphilis were 
treated. Eighty-six (86) cases of gonorrhea and 54 syphilitic cases were dis- 
charged. 

In the maternity ward there were 160 births, 75 males and 85 females. Eight 
(8) were still-born. 

The statistics for the department for the insane are for the 12 months ending 
September 30, 1935. No patients were committed to this department during the 
year. There were 31 deaths, 5 men and 26 women. Five (5) were discharged 
from the books, 3 men and 2 women ; 1 man and 1 woman were improved and the 
other 3 were unimproved. Ninety-six (96) men and 54 women were temporarily 
cared for and studied in our mental wards. Of these, 21 men and 16 women were 
committed as insane to other state hospitals. Ninety (90) young women from 
the general hospital department, mostly representing sex problems, were given 
psychometric examination. Twenty (20) juveniles were examined in relation to 
the commitment to the various Massachusetts training schools. 

An increasingly difficult problem is the matter of care of the growing number 
of very feeble and aged demented patients who we feel are too feeble to be trans- 
ferred to the state hospitals for mental diseases. 

Entertainments for the mental patients have included moving pictures, dances, 
sleigh and automobile rides, picnics and plays performed by the patients and by 
others. 

In the dental department there have been 2,413 chair patients; 1,945 extrac- 
tions in addition to much laboratory work, treatments, etc. 

The occupational therapy department has been conducted under the direction of 
four trained workers, all graduates of the Boston School of Occupational Therapy. 
Because of the group of mental patients who were engaged in this work becoming 
smaller, the few remaining were transferred in April to the newly opened sewing 
room in the Belcher building. In May a new workshop for ambulatory patients 
was started at the Bancroft tuberculosis hospital, where the use of a former sun 
porch was given over for this work. These men are occupied with woodwork, hook- 
ing, basketry, drawing, and shorthand, under a specified time limit. This type of 
treatment has also continued at the Fiske tuberculosis hospital for women. 

An average of 161 patients monthly have been treated; 25 in the central 
workshop for men; 20 in the men's hospital; 68 in the women's hospital; 22 in the 
Fiske; 15 in the Bancroft (for six months) ; and 11 in the mental wards (for four 
months) ; all finished work is used within the institution. 

The training school for nurses has maintained its standard of efficiency in pro- 
viding special care for our patients and an excellent training for a considerable 
number of young women. Our training school for nurses was highly favored and 
improved within the last few months through an affiliation with the Boston City 
Hospital for a period of one year. Our students are to spend the first year at this 
institution, the second year at Boston City Hospital, and return here for the third 
and final year of the course. On November 30, 1935, there was in the female 
nursing department a total of 278. 

Our farm products were somewhat disappointing owing to the drought during 
the growing season, and shortage of equipment, although improvement is noted 
in several items. Among the farm products were 390 tons of hay; 27 tons fodder; 
650 tons ensilage; 272 tons green feed; 67,000 lbs. of squash; 38,260 lbs. sweet 
corn; 40,000 lbs. cabbage; 45,000 lbs. other green vegetables; 10,285 lbs. peas 
and beans; 84,000 lbs. root vegetables; 6,060 lbs. melons; 7,365 lbs. small fruit; 
and 340 bbls. of apples. 

The dairy herd of thoroughbred Holstein stock produced 1,541,000 lbs. of milk 
or an average of 12,346 lbs. per cow. Produced also were 23,127 lbs. of veal; 
75,700 lbs. of pork; and 9,700 lbs. of poultry; 17,160 dozen of eggs; all used by 
the institution. 



46 P.D. 17. 

Under the heading of repairs and improvements some of the larger items include 
the new kitchen and dining room building and the new storehouse, erected under 
tlu' P.W.A. These have been completed and equipment is now being installed. 

The new pumping station at Round Pond has been completed and the water 
line connecting with the institution laid, a distance of about three miles. 

An E.R.A. project for the construction of 4 new filter beds is about 70 per cent 
completed. The repair of the 30 old filter beds is about 95 per cent completed. 
Work on these two projects has been temporarily stopped due to lack of funds. 

Other E.R.A. projects are the clearing of 50 acres of brush land, and a road 
project which was started but discontinued because of lack of funds. 

With an appropriation of $1,143,645 plus $34,820.28 brought forward from 
balance of 1934, the total amount available for maintenance was $1,178,465.28. 
Of this amount, $1,104,586.25 was expended. Of the amount expended, $489,509.25 
was for salaries, wages and labor; $615,077 for all other expenses. Net weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, $7,274. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $135,921.27. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$968,664.98. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average 
number of inmates, 5.4. 

INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER 

(Under the Department of Correction) 
James A. Warren, Superintendent 
Provides infirmary care for indigent persons (male) not chargeable to any city 
or town. The data following are for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1935. 

Numbers 

Number January 1, 1935 . 5 

Admitted during year . . . 10 

Discharged during year 11 

Remaining December 31, 1935 4 

Individuals under care during year 15 

Daily average inmates during year 5 

Largest census during year 8 

Deaths during year (included in discharged) 1 

MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 
Trustees 
Mr. Walter C. Baylies, Taunton, Chairman. 
Mr. Robert F. Bradford, Cambridge. 
Mr. William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline. 
Mr. Andrew Marshall, Boston. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D., Boston. 
Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $884,- 
951.15. Normal capacity of plant, 331. Value per unit of capacity, $2,673.56. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and deformed children of the Com- 
monwealth; those between the ages of five and fifteen and mentally competent to 
attend public schools are eligible for admission. Medical and surgical treatment 
for minor wards under the care of the Division of Child Guardianship is also 
provided. 



Number Dec. 1, 1934 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1935 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year . 



Numbers 






Males 


Females 


Total 


136 


132 


268 




195 


180 


375 




176 


174 


350 




155 


138 


293 




- 


- 


631 




139.55 


132.32 


271.87 


ir 


38.43 


82.62 


121.05 




- 


- 


308 




- 


- 


124 



Pt. I. 47 

Of the 643 cases cared for during the year 350 were discharged,— 285 from 
hospital care and 65 from the school. There have been admitted 375 children— 
305 to the hospital and 70 to the school. There remained at the close of the year, 
260 crippled and deformed children in the school and 33 sick minor wards in the 
hospital. The average age of the crippled children admitted to the school depart- 
ment during the year was 10 years, 11 months and 26 days; the youngest child 
admitted was 1 month and 19 days, while the oldest was 19 years, 9 months and 
18 days. 

While much of the time of the resident medical staff of necessity has been an 
official routine, such as the fitting and adjustment of hundreds of pieces of ortho- 
pedic apparatus and the systematic recording of symptoms and physical exami- 
nations, our physicians perform a mission of great value by cultivating the 
acquaintance of parents and by participating in the social life of our children, 
whose necessities make such a strong appeal to the human heart. 

During the year 203 surgical operations were performed by members of the 
resident and consulting staff. 

Of the 285 hospital cases discharged during the year, 233 were recovered, 9 were 
much improved, 33 were improved, 5 were not improved, 1 was discharged as 
mentally unpromising and 4 children died. 

In reporting upon the general oral hygiene of our entire patient population the 
dentist states that highly satisfactory results were observed in her systematic 
checkup. The dental hygienist, who examines the mouth of each child on an 
average of once every three months, gave prophylactic treatment in 1,296 cases. 
One thousand six hundred eighty-seven (1,687) dental operations were per- 
formed. 

Patients selected as susceptible of improvement under physiotherapy have been 
assigned for treatment in classes such as the post-operative group, the poliomye- 
litis group, the scoliosis group, the cerebral palsy group, etc. Such an arrange- 
ment not only stimulates interest in competitive accomplishment but conserves 
the physiotherapist's time so that she is able to direct outdoor sports and recre- 
ational activities. Baseball, swimming, hikes, rodeos, outdoor parties, coasting 
and skating — all are popular in season. The time seems opportune to consider 
whether or not we should have a swimming pool as a physiotherapeutic need 
which is being recognized with increasing insistence in orthopedic circles. 

Rearrangement of the nursing service under a shorter hour week already has 
been found to have many advantages when compared to minor difficulties in 
administration. Additional employees for whom the institution had no available 
living accommodations were selected from a long list of applicants sadly in need 
of employment whose homes were not far away. Several others previously em- 
ployed as residents, who were willing to be changed to a non-resident basis, made 
room for registered graduate nurses. 

The total number enrolled upon our school lists this year has been 264. 

The results shown by the record of graduates are a justifiable source of gratifica- 
tion to the citizens of the Commonwealth. 

The alumni continue to demonstrate their worth as a body of able and admirable 
young men and women. The reports of progress that come to the school on such 
occasions as the Alumni Association reunion last June, when 150 sat down to din- 
ner at the school, or the annual Alumni meeting and installation of officers in 
November at Boston are consistently encouraging, in spite of the bad economic 
conditions of recent years. There are now numbered among our successful gradu- 
ates an increasing number of interesting people. 

Obviously, a school having an average discharge age of fifteen or under cannot 
specifically train for so varied a list of vocations ; the following, however, is a list 
of occupations of some of our graduates : domestic, stenographer, sewing teacher, 
jeweler, realtor, factory worker, storekeeper, shoemaker, station agent, merchant 
marine, telegraph messenger, accountant, artificial limb salesman, bookkeeper, 
barber, chauffeur, clerical worker, cook, dairy products manager, designer, dental 
laboratory worker, elevator man, embalmer, farmer, hairdresser, herdsman, hos- 
pital nurse or attendant, hotel worker, lawyer, landscape gardener, linotype oper- 
ator, metal worker, motion picture house manager, miner, mechanic, musician, 



48 P.D. 17. 

newspaper reporter, plumber, printer, sculptor's assistant, secretary, salesman, 
tailor, teacher, telegrapher and telephone operator. We also have many students 
in high school, college, art school and agricultural school. 

The diploma of the school was conferred in June, 1935, upon 22 graduates from 
the eighth grade, and 2 in stenography. One of the recipients of last year's 
stenographic diplomas received the gold pin awarded in the Gregg course for speed 
in shorthand and typing. 

Physical conditions made it necessary for a large number of the class to remain 
at the school, but of those discharged, several are doing well in high school. One 
of the graduates in stenography was allowed full junior credit in the commercial 
course of her home high school, and returned there to go on in her senior year. 
Another graduate from that course, who made herself valuable as a volunteer 
office assistant while here, was discharged at the age of twenty-one. She has since 
then passed the State civil service examinations, and is employed in the office of 
a large State department. Still another girl, extremely and permanently handi- 
capped by infantile paralysis, has made herself so valuable in a Boston private 
school that she is now acting as its secretary. 

Undergraduate activities furnish large opportunity for character training and 
development. During the year these have been carried an as usual, enlarging 
their scope wherever possible. Student councils and sharing of responsibility in 
school enterprises, band, glee clubs, athletics, plays, parties and holiday celebra- 
tions all help in preparing our pupils to work in harmony with other people. The 
eighth grade, under the direction of their teacher, have continued their weekly 
afternoon teas. Many visitors from other states and other lands have been enter- 
tained, as well as those from our own community. 

With an appropriation of $208,241, plus $5,680.23 brought forward from balance 
of 1934, the total amount available for maintenance was $213,921.23. Of this 
amount, $195,716.22 was expended. Of the amount expended, $122,587.75 was 
for salaries, wages and labor; $73,128.47 for all other expenses. Net weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, $13.78. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $83,131.11. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$112,585.11. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average 
number of inmates, 1 to 2.2. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH 

Charles A. DuBois, Superintendent 

Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools 

Mr. Benjamin F. Felt, Melrose, Chairman. 

Mr. John J. Mahoney, Watertown, Vice-Chairman. 

Mr. Frank L. Boyden, Deerfield. 

Mrs. Dorothy Kirch wey Brown, Boston. 

Mr. Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 

Mr. Herbert B. Ehrmann, Brookline. 

Mr. James W. McDonald, Marlborough. 

Mrs. Ruth Evans O'Keefe, Lynn. 

Mr. John J. Sheehan, Westborough. 

Mr. Walter C. Bell, 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Executive Secretary. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $1,060,099.57. Normal capacity of 
plant, 450. Value per unit of capacity, $2,355.77. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent boys under fifteen 
years of age. Cottage plan. 

Numbers 

Males Females Total 

Number December 1, 1934 ... 395 - 395 

Admitted during year .... 694 - 694 

Discharged during year .... 738 - 738 



Pt. I. 49 

Males Females Total 



Remaining November 30, 1935 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year . 



351 - 351 

595 - 595 

397.63 - 397.63 

82.57 40.91 123.48 

439 - 439 

349 - 349 



Of the 694 cases received during the year, 249 were committed by courts, listed 
as follows: abuse of female child, 1; assault and battery, 6; breaking and enter- 
ing, 78; delinquent child, 13; indecent exposure, 1; larceny, 97; lewdness, 6; 
malicious injury to property, 4; receiving stolen property, 1; ringing false alarm 
of fire, 1; running away, 6; setting fires, 3; stubbornness, 22; unlawful appropri- 
ation of automobile, 8; violation of Training School regulations, 2. 

Of the above, 223 had been arrested before and 17 had been inmates of other 
institutions. Eighty-eight (88), or 35 per cent, were of American parentage; 
124, or 49 per cent, were foreign born, and the parentage of 4 was unknown. 
Twelve (12) of the boys were foreign born, and 237 were born in the United States. 
In addition to the court commitments, 327 were returned from parole, 81 run- 
aways captured, 22 returned from hospitals ; from visit home, 1 ; and 6 returned 
from funerals. 

Of the new commitments this year, 17 boys were eleven years of age or under. 
These young boys are taken care of in two cottages, one seven miles and the other 
three miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the older boys. 

The average length of stay in the Lyman School of boys paroled for the first 
time during the year ending November 30, 1935, was 12.79 months. 

Of the 738 cases discharged or released during the year, 392 were released on 
parole to parents and relatives; released on parole to others than relatives, 70; 
boarded out, 118; runaways, 95; released to hospitals, 23; transferred to other 
institutions, 27; released to funerals, 6; released to visit home, 1; released to court 
on habeas, 1 ; committed to State Hospital, 5. 

It has been the aim of the school to keep its boys actively engaged in work and 
study, with recreational and cultural activities in proper balance. The recre- 
ations and cultural pursuits of all the boys need careful direction. One hundred 
twenty (120) of our boys were given one week each at Camp Needle Ridge during 
the eight-week camping season. This is a step in the right direction, and there 
should be more outdoor activities under competent direction. A new toboggan 
slide has been completed, also the hobby classes and entertainments help in sup- 
plying cultural activities in the fields of music, dramatization, art and nature work. 

The work accomplished by the school psychologist has been very helpful during 
the past year. Much of this work was individual with boys, and has helped in 
classification and in discipline. The psychologist has also contributed to the suc- 
cess of the school's work by discussing problem cases with the cottage masters at 
their regular meetings, also individually. 

The change brought about by the inauguration of the 48-hour week law for 
state institutions has brought many additional problems to the school. Readjust- 
ments were made gradually in an effort to keep the course of the school as steady 
as possible, and the end of the fiscal year found the new officers fairly well adjusted 
to their various assignments. This reorganization made it possible to change the 
boys' daily routine so that they might have more time in the evening for recre- 
ation, reading and study. 

The two-platoon plan of organization of the academic branch of the school has 
been maintained. This plan seems to provide an adequate school program for the 
boys in both the regular and extra-curricula subjects. The recommendations of 
the State Department of Education and the report of the Boston University in- 
structors who made a study of the teaching at the Lyman School have been helpful. 
Arrangements were made so that certain teachers were able to take University 
Extension courses to equip themselves better for their work at the school. This 
has encouraged many teachers to take courses during the past year, particularly 
during the summer vacation period, with the result that they are better informed 



50 P.D. 17. 

on modern teaching methods and have a better understanding of the psychological 
factors involved in delinquency. 

The plan for handling clothing has been completely reorganized. A new system 
for the assignment and distribution of clothes has been inaugurated so that each 
boy may have his own outfit, for which he will have to assume some responsibility 
throughout his course of training at the school. 

New buildings and renovations at this institution have contributed much to the 
efficient management of the plant, as well as to its appearance. Two new hay 
barns were built during the past year and a wing added to the storehouse. A new 
cottage with a huge field stone fireplace was built at Camp Needle Ridge in Berlin. 
The locker room in the basement of the school building was completely renovated 
and the swimming tank enclosed; the old sewing room converted into a barber 
shop and clothes room. 

Much filling and grading have been done about the grounds under the direction 
of the head farmer. A road was built from Overlook Cottage to Riverview Cot- 
tage; the road from Bowlder Hill through to Oak Street resurfaced and oiled. 

From the farm a large crop of hay was harvested, and more ensilage than the 
silos would hold. An abundant supply of all vegetables was produced with the 
exception of potatoes, though 80,861 pounds were harvested. There were 33,751 
pounds of dressed pork produced; 3,709 dozen eggs; 2,917 pounds of dressed 
poultry; 3,441 pounds of beef; 83 pounds of veal, and 208,002 quarts of milk. 

From an appropriation of $257,820, plus $1,533.75 brought forward from the 
balance of 1934, the total amount available for maintenance was $259,320. Of 
this amount, $250,120.68 was expended. Of the amount expended, $127,487.46 
was for salaries, wages and labor, all other expenses, $122,633.22. Net weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales, and refunds from 
maintenance, $12.02. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$2,154.01. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $247,966.67. Ratio 
of daily average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 
1 to 3.2. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $830,050.70. Normal capacity of 
plant, 334. Value per unit of capacity, $2,485.18. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and under 
twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 



Numbers 

Males Females Total 



Number December 1, 1934 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining November 30, 1935 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year . 



339 - 339 

558 - 558 

592 - 592 

305 - 305 

892 - 892 

317 - 317 

66 21 87 

349 - 349 

288 - 288 



The list of causes of admission in the 365 cases committed during the year was 
as follows: abuse of female child, 1; armed robbery, 1; assault, 1; assault and 
battery, 5; assault with dangerous weapon, 4; assault to rape, 1; attempt to 
break and enter, 4; attempted larceny, 3; being a runaway, 4; breaking and 
entering, 40; breaking and entering and larceny, 80; breaking glass, 1; buggery, 1; 
burning building, 3 ; carrying revolver, 5 ; cutting down timber, 1 ; drunkenness, 3 ; 
failure on parole, 17; false alarm of fire, 4; larceny, 93; lewdness, 2; malicious 
mischief, 1; malicious injury to property, 1; receiving stolen goods, 5; stubborn, 



Pt. I. 51 

disobedient and delinquent, 22; unlawful appropriation of auto, 53; unnatural 
act, 3; vagrancy, 2; violating auto laws, 4. 

In addition to the above, 165 boys were returned from parole, 8 returned from 
leave of absence, 19 returned from hospitals and 1 returned from court. Of the 
365 boys committed by the courts, 320 had been in court before, and 81 had been 
inmates of other institutions. Eleven (11), or 3 per cent, of the 365 boys com- 
mitted were foreign born, and 353, or 96.7 per cent, were born in the United States. 
Eighty-eight (88), or 24 per cent, were of American parentage; 159, or 43.5 per 
cent, were of foreign-born parents; while the parentage of 27 was unknown. 

Of the 592 boys discharged or released during the year, 365 were paroled; 
returned cases re-paroled, 153; granted leave of absence, 7; transferred to Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory, 8; transferred to other institutions, not penal, 19; taken 
to court on habeas and held, 7; absent without leave, 29; died, 2; discharged, 2. 

With a normal capacity of 334 the school carried an average of 317 during the 
year. Eight hundred ninety-two (892) boys were dealt with during the year 
and the length of stay in school of all boys paroled for the first time during the 
year was 9.38 months. 

Individual study and personal guidance is the basis of all activities at the School, 
yet there is great need for a trained worker to devote his entire time to the study 
of the boy, and preparation of the material to be used as a basis for developing a 
wise program for him. 

That he may take his place in the community as a responsible citizen, is the 
aim of the twenty-four hour weekly schooling for the delinquent boy. Because a 
large amount of retraining is involved, and an all too brief time allotted (an 
average stay of nine months) the work must necessarily be much more intensive 
and planned in great detail. Also, because of the wide variations in the attitudes 
and aptitudes of the boys, the course of training must be vastly more flexible. It is 
encouraging to find so many boys, with a history of chronic truancy, becoming 
eager to attend school. 

The athletic program has been an unusually active one. Baseball, football and 
basketball teams were successful, as was the boxing team which was added to our 
program this year. Occupational efficiency is continued as in the past with excel- 
lent results. There is still much to be done in finding something for the naturally 
inefficient and uninterested type of boy. 

However, the School has had another successful year with a group of active 
boys busily engaged from morning until night in their studies, their tasks and 
their play. 

During the year 78.89 acres of land was purchased, giving us additional pastur- 
age and woodland. No large projects were included in the development of the 
School; the physical plant is in good conditions, although many minor repairs 
were necessary, especially in the older buildings. It is hoped that the new outdoor 
swimming pool will be completed during the coming year. 

The farm added much to the food supply of the institution. Some of the larger 
items were 640 barrels of apples, 197,000 quarts of milk, 9,000 dozen eggs and 
12,000 pounds of pork. 

With an appropriation of $175,850 plus $2,236.15 brought forward from balance 
of 1934, the total amount available for maintenance was $178,086.15. Of this 
amount, $167,497.06 was expended. Of the amount expended, $84,264.53 was for 
personal services; $93,821.62 for all other expenses. 

Net weekly per capita cost of maintenance, $10.11. Total receipts from all 
sources other than the State treasury, $470.15. Net cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth, $167,026.91. Ratio of daily average number of persons em- 
ployed to daily average number of inmates, 3.6. 



52 P.D. 17. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER 

Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $656,838.96. Normal capacity of 
plant, 303. Value per unit of capacity, $2,167.78. Founded in 1854 as a private 
institution. Taken over by the State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under seven- 
teen years of age at time of commitment. 

Numbers 

Males Females Total 



Number December 1, 1934 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining November 30, 1935 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year . 

The list of causes of admission for 159 
at the school during the year is as follows 



247 247 

236 236 

227 227 

257 257 

455 455 

274.18 274.18 
25 56.93 81.93 

293 293 

247 247 

commitments of the 236 cases received 
being an idle and disorderly person, 1 ; 
being an idle and disorderly person and being a runaway, 1 ; being a lewd person, 
1; being a runaway, 10; breaking, entering and larceny, 1; breaking and entering 
in night time and larceny, 1; delinquent, 13; delinquent child — drunkenness, 1; 
delinquent child — fornication, 2; delinquent child — stubborn, 2; delinquency 
— lewdness, 8; delinquency — runaway, 2; delinquent by reason of lewd and 
lascivious behavior, 1; delinquent — lewd, wanton and lascivious person in 
speech and behavior, 2; fornication, 6; larceny, 14; lewdness, 8; lewd and las- 
civious cohabitation, 1; lewd and lascivious person in speech and behavior, 2; 
lewd, wanton, and lascivious person in speech and behavior, 4; running away 
from custody and control of parents, 1; stubborn child, 46; stubborn and dis- 
obedient child, 2 ; stubbornnness, 23 ; transferred from Division of Child Guardian- 
ship, 6 (delinquency, 4; runaway, 1; stubbornness, 1). 

Of the above, 59, or 37 per cent, were of American parentage; 60, or 38 per 
cent, were of foreign parentage. 

Recalled to the school, 24; from leave of absence, 3; from absence without 
leave, 3 ; from hospitals, 18. 

The average length of stay in school of all girls was 1 year, 8 months and 17 days. 

Of the 227 girls released from the school during the year, 70 were released on 
parole to parents or relatives; on parole to parents to attend school, 21; on parole 
to other families for wages, 94; on parole to other families to attend school, 4; 
leave of absence, 3; absence without leave, 2; transferred to hospitals, 26; com- 
mitted to Department of Defective Delinquents, 6; transferred to Reformatory 
for Women, 1. 

Of the 159 girls committed to the school, 151 were born in the United States 
and 8 in foreign countries. 

Physical examinations at the hospital are given to each individual on her 
entrance to the school. The principles of care and improvement of the body are 
stressed at the receiving cottage, following transfer from the hospital, and these 
principles are continued at a training cottage. Close association with staff mem- 
bers and house mothers, chapel and school assemblies and religious instruction 
emphasize character training and furnish spiritual help and guidance to the girls. 
Wholesome living conditions at the School, regular hours for work and recreation, 
a definite program of industrial and academic activities in addition to the responsi- 
bility given to each girl to accomplish successfully the tasks assigned — all con- 
tribute to self-reliance and character building helpful to the girl. 

The Physical Education Director supervises the recreational activities for both 
morning and afternoon classes. In addition to formal gymnastics, folk dancing and 



Pt. I 53 

other types of dancing and games were taught in regular periods. In the evening, 
cottage recreation periods are held in the gymnasium in volley ball and basketball. 
Competition has been keen in tournaments arranged for both games. The aim of 
these evening periods is training in team play and good sportsmanship. An ath- 
letic field has been made available for apparatus, some of which is now in place, 
and additional playground and game material is anticipated for the coming year. 

In the educational department the School is fortunate in having a central school 
building, which offers excellent facilities for a well rounded program, affording 
each child the opportunities which seem best for her development. 

The eighth grade girls are offered graduation with certificates of. promotion to 
the first-year high school. The high school curriculum is based on a business 
course and offers practical work. Bookkeeping and stenography are given in the 
second and third years, while typewriting is given in all three years. 

The addition of a class in elementary science in the eighth grade has created a 
new interest. A few science books for reference, microscopes, and simple experi- 
ments in connection with this subject, are helping to develop independent thinking. 

Domestic science classes consist of groups of 8 to 10 girls : emphasis being given 
to cooking, serving and table manners. 

A more formal class in homemaking, but one of very practical value, is given 
by the domestic science teacher to the seventh grade girls, and includes a discus- 
sion of the home, furnishing of rooms, selection of goods as to their cost and nutri- 
tive value, and the making of menus. 

From an appropriation of $151,187, plus a total of $8.56 brought forward from 
balance of 1934, the amount available for maintenance was $151,195.56. Of this 
amount, $140,910.48 was expended. Of the amount expended, $71,436.22 was for 
salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $69,474.26. Weekly per capita cost 
of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, 
$9.78. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $1,424.30. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $139,486.18. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.3. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS 

In the matter of financial supervision, the Department examines and analyzes 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the institu- 
tion and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of the 
inmates. The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condi- 
tion of each institution. 

CAPACITY, POPULATION AND INVENTORY 

Table I gives in brief a statistical representation of the size and value of the 
five institutions under the supervision of the Department. Part I deals with the 
number of persons served by the institutions. Part II deals with the value of 
the property. 

Table I. — Part I. — Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for the 
Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1935 



INSTITUTIONS 


Normal 
Capacity 


Present Any 
One Time 


Daily A 
Present 


verage Number 
during the year 


Largest 
Number 


Smallest 
Number 


1935 


1934 


1933 


State Infirmary 

Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 


3,150 
331 
450 
334 
303 


3,181 
308 
439 
349 
293 


2,731 
124 
349 
288 
247 


2,904 
271 
397 
317 
274 


2,965 
273 
399 
335 
258 


3,069 
301 
419 
300 
298 


Totals .... 


4,568 


4,570 


3,739 


4,163 


4,230 


4,387 



54 



P.D. 17. 



Table I. — Part II. — Inventory c 


/ the Five Institutions 




Real and Peksonal Estate 


INSTITUTIONS 


LAND 


Buildings 


Personal Total 




Acres 


Value 


Property Value 


State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


916.00 
165.72 
579.13 
968.04 
368.80 


$84,579 94 
41,806 00 
57,525 57 
35,629 80 
22,680 00 


$3,118,576 49 
727,549 56 
849,938 47 
644,151 00 
516,875 82 


$547,569 03 $3,750,725 46 
115,595 59 884,951 15 
152,635 53 1,060,099 57 
150,269 90 830,050 70 
117,283 4 656,838 96 


Totals .... 


2,997 69 


$242,221 31 


$5,857,091 34 $1,083,353 19 $7,182,665 84 



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Pt. I. 57 

Table III. — Part II. — Expenditures of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1935 — Continued 





For Special. Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnish- 
ing and 
Equipping 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Total 


State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


$830 00 
4,725 00 

1,353 67 
3,500 00 


$364,299 08 
37,609 72 
22,138 55 
10,787 09 


~ 


$85,264 89 
11,436 49 

373 79 


$450,393 97 

53,771 21 

22,138 55 

12,140 76 

3,873 79 


Totals .... 


$10,408 67 


$434,834 44 


- 


$97,075 17 


$542,318 28 



Table III. — Part III. — Summary 
November 30, 


of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year ending 
1935 — Concluded 


INSTITUTIONS Maintenance 


Special 
Purposes 


Trust 
Funds 


Total 


State Infirmary . . . $1,104,586 25 
Massachusetts Hospital School 195,716 22 
Lyman School for Boys . . 250,120 68 
Industrial School for Boys . , 167,497 06 
Industrial School for Girls . 140,910 48 


$450,393 97 

53,771 21 

22,138 55 

12,140 76 

3,873 79 


$12,713 04 
70 97 


$1,554,980 22 
249,487 43 
284,972 27 
179,637 82 
144,855 24 


Totals .... $1,858,830 69 


$542,318 28 


$12,784 01 


$2,413,932 98 



58 



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60 



P.D. 17. 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS 



Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the four county 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the visita- 
tion of this Department, which is required to report thereon in its annual report. 
The names of the schools and the Superintendents are as follows: 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence, James R. Tetler 

Hampden County Training School, Springfield (Feeding Hills) Chris L. Berninger 

Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford, J. Earl Wolton 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston), Colonel Edgar C. Erickson 

Table I shows the trend of the population in the County Training Schools during 
the past five years. 

Table I. — County Training Schools — Average Number in Schools during the 

Years 1931-1935 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 



Essex County Training School 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Worcester County Training School 

Totals .... 



84.0 


85.0 


80.0 


88.0 


88.5 


26.0 


23.6 


17.9 


34.0 


27.0 


96.0 


83.0 


88.0 


110.0 


138.0 


29.2 


24.0 


26.0 


30.0 


29.0 



235.2 215.6 211.9 262.0 282.5 



Table II shows the numbers and the movement of the population in these 
institutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1935, and also the average 
weekly per capita cost of maintenance, $11.84, subtracting all receipts from 
private sources. 

As will be seen from Table II there were 425 children in the four schools during 
1935. The year opened with 256. In the succeeding twelve months 169 were ad- 
mitted and 119 were discharged, leaving 306. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was 13 years, 
7 months, 16 days. Every child must be discharged, by the requirements of the 
statute, upon reaching the age of sixteen. 

Table II. — County Training Schools — Number and Movement of Population 





Number in School during the Year 


Main- 


School 


On Released Remain- 
Whole Jan. 1, Admitted or Dis- J^f °£ 
Number 1935 charged 1935 


of Schools 

(Average 

Weekly 

per Capita 

Cost) 


Essex County Training School . 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Worcester County Training School 


135 85 51 33 103 
43 24 19 13 30 

193 116 77 51 142 
53 31 22 22 31 


$8 57 

15 33 

9 89 

13 59 


Totals .... 


425 256 169 119 306 


$11 84 



LICENSED BOARDING HOMES FOR AGED PERSONS 

Francis Bardwell, Supervisor 

Under section 22A of chapter 121 of the General Laws, which provides that 
"whoever maintains a home in which three or more persons over the age of sixty 
years, and not members of his immediate family are provided with care, incident 
to advanced age, shall be deemed to maintain a boarding home for aged persons," 
this Department is delegated to issue licenses and to make, alter and amend rules 
and regulations for the government of such homes. 

During the year ending November 30, 1935, 100 applications for licenses were 
received; 95 licenses were issued; 42 licenses were renewed, and 50 licenses were 
cancelled. There are at present 306 licenses in 98 cities and towns, as follows: 



Pt. I. 

Acushnet, 2 
Amesbury, 1 
Amherst, 3 
Andover, 1 
Arlington, 3 
Ashland, 1 
Athol, 3 
Attleboro, 2 
Bedford, 1 
Belmont, 2 
Beverly, 1 
Boston, 54 
Braintree, 3 
Brockton, 5 
Brookline, 20 
Cambridge, 3 
Cheshire, 1 
Clinton, 2 
Cohasset, 1 
Colrain, 1 
Concord, 2 
Dalton, 1 
Danvers, 4 
Everett, 1 
Fairhaven, 2 



61 



Fitchburg, 2 
Florence, 1 
Framingham, 5 
Gloucester, 1 
Great Barrington, 1 
Groveland, 1 
Hanover, 1 
Hanson, 1 
Haverhill, 6 
Hingham, 1 
Holbrook, 2 
Holliston, 1 
Holyoke, 1 
Hopedale, 1 
Hopkinton, 4 
Hudson, 1 
Lawrence, 1 
Leominster, 2 
Lincoln, 1 
Littleton, 1 
Lowell, 1 
Lynn, 9 
Maiden, 3 
Marblehead, 1 



Marlborough, 3 
Medfield, 1 
Medford, 3 
Melrose, 4 
Middleborough, 2 
Milford, 1 
Milton, 1 
Monson, 1 
Natick, 2 
Needham, 1 
New Bedford, 5 
Newbury port, 3 
Newton, 6 
Northampton, 1 
Norwood, 3 
Peabody, 3 
Pelham, 2 
Pittsfield, 3 
Quincy, 6 
Raynham, 1 
Reading, 1 
Salem, 3 
Scituate, 3 
Seekonk, 2 



Sharon, 1 
Sherborn, 1 
Somerville, 5 
Springfield, 15 
Stockbridge, 1 
Stoneham, 1 
Stoughton, 2 
Sudbury, 3 
Wakefield, 3 
Waltham, 7 
Warren, 1 
Watertown, 7 
Wellesley, 1 
Westborough, 1 
West Bridgewater, 1 
Westfield, 1 
Westford, 1 
West Springfield, 1 
Weymouth, 5 
Whitman, 2 
Winthrop, 1 
Worcester, 10 
Wrentham, 1 
Yarmouth, 3 



During the past year the Department has found it necessary to issue orders in 
eleven homes to have locks removed from the outside of doors leading to patients' 
rooms. In fourteen homes patients over 60 years of age having rooms on the third 
floor were ordered to be cared for elsewhere. Thirty- three complaints in regard 
to different homes throughout the State have been received. These have been 
investigated and the Department felt justified in revoking three licenses. Twenty 
applications for licenses have been refused because either the applicant or her 
house did not meet the requirements. It is the policy of the Department to grant 
licenses only after the house has been approved by the local building inspector, 
and no license is granted until the applicant's house has fulfilled the requirements 
of such laws. 

The Department maintains an index of homes by localities, prices, and names 
of persons maintaining these licensed places. This has been found helpful to 
many people as well as to local welfare boards. The homes range in price from 
$7 a week to over $100 a week. 

During the year 873 visits were made to the homes. 

SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED 
BY CITIES AND TOWNS 

General Laws, chapter 117, section 3, and chapter 121, sections 7 and 16, pro- 
vide that the Department of Public Welfare may visit and inspect all places 
where city or town poor are supported in families, and require the Department 
to visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are maintained by the Com- 
monwealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense of any city 
or town. Children illegally retained in city or town infirmaries must be removed 
therefrom and placed at board at the expense of the city or town concerned. 

The Settled Adult Poor Provided for in Families 
Of the 582 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully supported in 
families on January 1, 1935, — 39 had died, and 79 had been removed before visits 
were made. The remaining 464, 281 men and 183 women, were all visited and 
reported on by the Department's agents. They were supported by 149 cities and 
towns as follows : 



Abington, 4 
Acushnet, 5 
Amherst, 2 
Andover, 1 
Arlington, 18 
Ashby, 2 
Ashfield, 1 
Ashland, 4 
Athol, 5 
Auburn, 3 
Avon, 1 
Barnstable, 3 
Bedford, 1 
Belchertown, 3 
Bernardston, 1 
Billerica, 2 



Blackstone, 1 
Boxford, 1 
Braintree, 4 
Brewster, 1 
Bridgewater, 2 
Brookfield, 1 
Brookline, 5 
Buckland, 9 
Carver, 1 
Chelmsford, 2 
Chelsea, 5 
Chicopee, 6 
Clinton, 3 
Cohasset, 4 
Colrain, 4 
Concord, 2 



Conway, 1 
Cummington, 2 
Dalton, 14 
Danvers, 12 
Dedham, 3 
Deerfield, 4 
Dennis, 1 
Dighton, 4 
Douglas, 1 
Dover, 1 
Duxbury, 1 
East Bridgewater, 2 
Easthampton, 7 
Everett, 1 
Falmouth, 1 



Foxborough, 7 
Gill, 2 
Goshen, 1 
Grafton, 1 
Granville, 2 
Great Barrington, 
Groton, 1 
Groveland, 3 
Halifax, 1 
Hamilton, 1 
Hancock, 1 
Hardwick, 1 
Haverhill, 3 
Heath, 3 
Hingham, 1 



62 

Hopedale, 1 
Kingston, 1 
Lakeville, 1 
Lancaster, 3 
Lanesborough, J 
Lee, 3 
Lenox, 1 
Leominster, 5 
Leverett, 1 
Lexington, 2 
Leyden, 1 
Littleton, 1 
Ludlow, 4 
Lunenburg, 4 
Maiden, 4 
Maynard, 5 
Medfield, 2 
Medway, 1 
Melrose, 12 
Merrimac, 5 
Methuen, 1 
Middleborough, 



10 



Millville, 1 


Princeton, 1 


Monson, 1 


Quincy, 1 


Montague, 3 


Raynham, 1 


Natick, 1 


Reading, 4 


Needham, 2 


Rochester, 2 


Newburyport, 7 


Royalston, 2 


Newton, 1 


Russell, 1 


New Marlborough, 2 


Sandisfield, 2 


New Salem, 2 


Scituate, 1 


North Attleborough, 1 


Seekonk, 1 


Northborough, 3 


Sheffield, 3 


Norfolk, 1 


Sherborn, 1 


Northfield, 5 


Shirley. 3 


North Reading, 1 


Shrewsbury, 2 


Norton, 5 


Southampton, 1 


Norwood, 12 


Springfield, 3 


Orange, 4 


Stoneham, 2 


Otis, 3 


Stoughton, 2 


Palmer, 1 


Stow, 3 


Peabody ; 6 


Sutton, 1 


Petersham, 2 


Swampscott, 1 


Pittsfield, 9 


Templeton, 4 



P.D. 17. 

Tewksbury, 2 
Topsfield, 1 
Tynngham, 1 
Walpole, 1 
Wareham, 2 
Warwick, 1 
Watertown, 9 
Wayland, 1 
Wellesley, 5 
Wellfleet, 2 
Wenham, 1 
West Boylston. 1 
West Springfield, 17 
Westwood, 2 
Weymouth, 4 
Whitman, 16 
Williamstown, 3 
Winchendon, 1 
Winthrop, 3 
Woburn, 1 
Yarmouth, 5 



Their ages were as follows: 9 between 21 and 30; 19 between 30 and 40, 29 be- 
tween 40 and 50; 73 between 50 and 60; 142 between 60 and 70; 125 between 70 
and 80; 57 between 80 and 90; 9 between 90 and 100; and 1 was 105. 

For their support there was paid in 1 case less than $2; in 17 cases from $2 to 
$3; in 47 cases from $3 to $4; in 399 cases — mostly of old and feeble persons — 
the rate varied from $4 to $15 per week according to the amount of care required. 

Of the whole number 242 were reported to be in good or fairly good physical 
condition, and 421 in good or fairly good mental condition. In all cases they were 
apparently receiving good care. There were 92 able to do light work either in 
the house or about the premises. In 233 cases, according to the reports the mem- 
bers of the local board of public welfare complied with the law requiring them to 
visit these persons at least once in every six months ; in 98 cases they were visited 
once during the year; in 133 cases they were not visited at all. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for Outside 

Infirmaries 
As shown by the department's visitation of the 2,002 children reported by the 
authorities as fully supported outside the infirmaries on January 1, 1935, and 
July 1, 1935, 186 had been removed before visits could be made, 1 had died, and 
24 were supporting themselves. The remaining 1,791 — 892 boys and 899 girls — 
were supported by 122 cities and towns as follows: 

Acushnet, 2 
Adams, 8 
Agawam, 2 



Amherst, 1 
Andover, 1 
Arlington, 3 
Ashburnham, 2 
Athol, 5 
Attleboro, 2 
Auburn, 2 
Barre, 1 
Bellingham, 1 
Beverly, 8 
Billerica, 5 
Boston, 962 
Braintree, 11 
Bridgewater, 7 
Brockton, 5 
Brookline, 17 
Buckland, 1 
Cambridge, 14 
Canton, 1 
Charlemont, 1 
Charlton, 1 
Chelmsford, 2 
Chelsea, 5 
Chicopee, 12 
Clinton, 11 
Concord, 2 
Dan vers, 1 
Dartmouth, 1 



Dedham, 3 
Deerfield, 3 
Dennis, 6 
Dighton, 1 
East Bridgewater, 4 
Easthampton, 3 
Easton, 2 
Fairhaven, 8 
Falmouth, 12 
Fitchburg, 7 
Framingham, 5 
Gardner, 16 
Greenfield, 5 
Hampden, 1 
Hanover, 2 
Hanson, -1 
Harwich, 8 
Holyoke, 1 
Hopkinton, 1 
Ipswich, 1 
Lawrence, 2 
Lee, 1 

Leominster, 9 
Lincoln, 3 
Ludlow, 9 
Lunenburg, 5 
Lynn, 15 
Maiden, 11 
Marblehead, 5 
Medford, 3 
Melrose, 6 



Merrimac, 5 
Methuen, 6 
Middleborough, 11 
Milford, 7 
Millbury, 2 
Milton, 2 
Montague, 8 
Nantucket, 4 
Natick, 7 
Needham, 5 
New Bedford, 59 
Newburyport, 7 
Newton, 10 
North Brookfield, 4 
Northborough, 4 
Northbridge, 2 
Northfield, 4 
Norton, 3 
Palmer, 2 
Peabody, 7 
Pepperell, 7 
Pittsfield, 17 
Plainville, 3 
Plymouth, 3 
Princeton, 2 
Quincy, 7 
Randolph, 1 
Reading, 3 
Rochester, 6 
Rockland, 4 
Royalston, 2 



Salem, 22 
Seekonk, 1 
Shirley, 5 
Somerset, 2 
Somerville, 3 
South Hadley, 1 
Southborough, 1 
Southbridge, 1 
Springfield, 33 
Sterling, 2 
Stockbndge, 2 
Stoneham, 8 
Stoughton, 1 
Taunton, 25 
Templeton, 3 
Wareham, 13 
Watertown, 3 
Webster, 9 
Wellesley, 2 
Wellfleet, 1 
West Brookfield, 1 
West Springfield, 5 
Weymouth, 8 
Whitman, 2 
Williamstown, 3 
Winchendon, 7 
Windsor, 2 
Worcester, 154 
Yarmouth, 1 



Of the whole number 85 were cared for and treated in hospitals and institu- 
tions. There were 1,351 who attended school, and 234 who did more or less work 
about the house. Of the whole number, 1,734 were in good or fairly good physical 
condition, and 1,702 in good or fairly good mental condition. The price of board 



Pt. I. 63 

varies from $1 to $10 per week. These children were found to be well cared for 
with a few exceptions, which have been brought to the attention of the local board 
of public welfare. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for in 

Infirmaries 
Visits were made to 83 children — 38 boys and 45 girls — reported to be cared for 
by the following cities and towns in their infirmaries : 

Boston, 51 Holyoke, 5 New Bedford, 2 Watertown, 1 

Dedham, 1 Lawrence, 1 Southbridge, 1 Worcester, 1 

Fall River, 9 Lowell, 2 Springfield, 1 

Haverhill, 1 Maiden, 5 Sturbridge, 2 

In addition to this number 1 had been removed from an infirmary before the 
time of visitation. Of the number visited, 35 were so defective in either mind or 
body as to make their retention in an infirmary desirable. 

The Penalty Incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for Failure to Make 
their Returns of Poor Relief during the Month of April, 1935 
Under sections 32-35 of chapter 117 of the General Laws, the department re- 
ported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns 
which failed to make their returns of poor relief during the month of April, 1935, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows: Aga- 
wam, $2; Ashfield, $1; Avon, $3; Belchertown, $1; Berlin, $41; Bernardston, $1; 
Billerica, $1; Braintree, $9; Chatham, $10; Dover, $5; Dracut, $2; Freetown, 
$1,659 (1933, 1934 and 1935); Gay Head, $12; Goshen, $1; Granby, $30; Hali- 
fax, $9; Hamilton, $1; Haverhill, $7; Holland, $91; Holliston, $1; Hopkinton, 
$357 (1934); Hull, $279 (1934); Leicester, $1; Leverett, $10; Leyden, $10; 
Marshfield, $7; Mashpee, $33; Montgomery, $9; Nahant, $1; New Braintree, $9; 
New Salem, $8; North Reading, $1; Northfield, $8; Plainfield, $13; Province- 
town; $38; Russell, $2; Salisbury, $9; Seekonk, $10; Shrewsbury, $10; Spencer, 
$13; Stockbridge, $3; Swansea, $3; Tyngsborough, $8; Wakefield, $1; Wayland, 
$7; Wellfleet, $35; West Bridgewater, $9; Westport, $16; Worcester, $736 (1934 
and 1935). Total, $3,533. 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION 

The Commissioner of Public Welfare made two recommendations for legislation 
this year. These recommendations were forwarded to the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth on December 4, 1935, in accordance with the provisions of section 33 
of chapter 30 of the General Laws. The recommendations were as follows: 
I. Changing the Name of the State Infirmary 

The Trustees of the State Infirmary at Tewksbury desire to change the name 
of the institution to the "State General Hospital." Such a change would properly 
represent the modern development of the institution. It has grown from a state 
almshouse to a good general hospital, and has a staff of doctors, nurses and 
attendants large enough to give reasonably adequate service. The addition of 
modern hospital wards and modern units has put the institution in a condition 
where its standards compare favorably with those of other general hospitals. It is 
the belief of the Trustees and of this Department that the proposed change of 
name as an expression of the modern attitude toward the patients would be very 
beneficial to the people who are served by the institution and would give more 
satisfaction to their friends. 

II. Relative to Patients' Funds at the State Infirmary and the Disposi- 
tion of Unclaimed Property and Moneys represented by Bank 
Books belonging to Former Patients 

At the State Infirmary there has never been legislation authorizing the disposi- 
tion of unclaimed valuables. Small sums are involved, but over a long period of 
years a considerable volume of material has accumulated which might be sold for 
something, and at any rate should be disposed of. A few bank books remain 
unclaimed, and in the case of accounts with closed banks some authority should 
be given to the institution to establish a claim. I recommend that legislation be 
enacted similar to that recently enacted to give authority to the Department of 
Mental Diseases in relation to its hospitals. 



64 P.D. 17. 

LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT PASSED BY THE 
LEGISLATURE OF 1935 

Chap. 56. — Resolve Establishing a Special Commission to Study and Revise 
the Laws Relating to Public Welfare 

Resolved, That a special unpaid commission, to consist of one member of the 
senate to be designated by the president thereof, three members of the house of 
representatives to be designated by the speaker thereof, and three persons to be 
appointed by the governor, is hereby established to make a survey and study of 
the laws of the Commonwealth relating to public welfare, including mothers' aid 
and old age assistance, with a view to the revision and codification of said laws and 
to the recommending of such changes therein and additions thereto as may ap- 
pear necessary or desirable. In making said survey and study, said commission 
shall consider the subject matter of current senate document numbered forty-four 
and current house documents numbered two hundred and seven, two hundred 
and forty-six, five hundred and thirty-one and ten hundred and twenty-four. 
Said commission shall hold hearings, shall be provided with quarters in the state 
house or elsewhere and may expend, with the approval of the governor and 
council, for expenses and legal, clerical and other assistance such sums, not exceed- 
ing, in the aggregate, twenty-five hundred dollars, as may hereafter be appropri- 
ated. Said commission shall report to the general court the results of its 
investigations and its recommendations, if any, together with drafts of legislation 
necessary to carry said recommendations into effect, by filing the same with the 
clerk of the house of representatives not later than the first Wednesday of De- 
cember in the current year. (Approved July 22, 1935.) 

Chap. 164 — An Act Requiring Notice in Writing in Order to Establish 
Municipal Liability for Relief of Needy Persons in Certain Cases 

Chapter one hundred and seventeen of the General Laws is hereby amended 
by striking out section twenty-four, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, 
and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section 2Jf.. -Every town shall be 
liable for any expense necessarily incurred under this chapter or under chapter 
one hundred and twenty-two for the relief of a person in need of public assistance 
therein by any person not liable by law for his support, after notice and request 
made in writing to one or more of the members of the board of public welfare 
thereof, and until provision is made by them. [Approved April 15, 1935.) 

Chap. 311. — An Act Relative to Funds Received by the Director of the 
Division of Aid an,d Relief for the Benefit of Persons under the Care 
and Supervision of the Department of Public Welfare and Providing for 
the Bonding of Said Director 

Section 1. Section seven of chapter eighteen of the General Laws, as appear- 
ing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby amended by adding at the end thereof 
the following new sentence: — Said director shall give a bond to the state treasurer 
for the faithful performance of his duties in such sum as the comptroller may pre- 
scribe, — so as to read as follows: — Section 7. The commissioner, with the ap- 
proval of the governor and council, shall appoint, fix the compensation of, and 
may with like approval remove, the director of the division of aid and relief, who 
shall, under the supervision and control of the commissioner, perform the duties 
required of him by law relative to the state adult poor. Said director shall give 
a bond to the state treasurer for the faithful performance of his duties in such 
sum as the comptroller may prescribe. 

Section 2. Chapter one hundred and twenty-one of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by inserting after section eight, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edi- 
tion, the following new section: — Section 8 A. The director of the division of aid 
and relief may receive funds in trust for the use of illegitimate children or other 
persons under the care or supervision of the department. Such director shall 
deposit such funds in savings banks in the Commonwealth or savings departments 
of trust companies therein and, when necessary, make expenditures from said 
funds for the benefit of or on behalf of the ward. {Approved May 29, 1935.) 



Pt. II. 65 

Chap. 494. — An Act Relative to the Acceptance and Expenditure of Cer- 
tain Federal Funds under the Social Security Act, so called, and 
Changing the Residence Requirements for Mothers' Aid and Old Age 
Assistance so Far as Necessary to Obtain Said Funds 
Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 
therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate 
preservation of the public health and convenience. 

Section 1. The departments of public welfare, public health and education 
shall co-operate with the appropriate federal authorities in the administration of 
the act of congress approved in August in the current year, known as the Social 
Security Act, and accept for the commonwealth the benefits thereof, and the 
state treasurer shall be the custodian of the funds allotted to the commonwealth 
under the provisions of said act. The funds so allotted shall be expended without 
specific appropriation under the order of the commissioner of public welfare in 
carrying out the provisions of said act so far as they relate to mothers' aid, old 
age assistance, care of homeless or neglected children and the care of crippled 
children; under the order of the commissioner of public health in carrying out 
the provisions of said act so far as they relate to maternal and child health services 
and public health work, and under the order of the commissioner of education in 
carrying out the provisions of said act so far as they relate to vocational rehabili- 
tation and aid to the blind. 

Section 2. Chapter one hundred and eighteen of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out section one, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, 
and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section 1. This chapter shall apply 
to all mothers and their dependent children under the age of sixteen, whether or 
not they or any of them may have a settlement within the commonwealth, who 
shall have resided therein not less than one year immediately preceding the date 
of application for aid under this chapter, and to mothers with dependent children 
born within the commonwealth within one year immediately preceding the date 
of such application if the mother has resided in the commonwealth for one year 
immediately preceding the birth. A mother shall not be disqualified from receiv- 
ing aid under this chapter because of having but one such child. 

Section 3. Section one of chapter one hundred and eighteen A of the General 
Laws, as most recently amended by chapter three hundred and twenty-eight of 
the acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-three, is hereby further amended by strik- 
ing out, in the fourth to the tenth lines, the words "twenty years immediately pre- 
ceding the date of application for such assistance, subject to such reasonable ex- 
ceptions as to continuity of residence as the department of public welfare, in this 
chapter called the department, may determine by rules hereinafter authorized, 
shall be granted under the supervision of the department" and inserting in place 
thereof the words: — five years during the nine years immediately preceding the 
date of application for such assistance and who shall have resided in the common- 
wealth continuously for one year immediately preceding said date of application, 
shall be granted under the supervision of the department of public welfare, in this 
chapter called the department, — so as to read as follows: — Section 1. Adequate 
assistance to deserving citizens in need of relief and support seventy years of age 
or over who shall have resided in the commonwealth not less than five years during 
the nine years immediately preceding the date of application for such assistance 
and who shall have resided in the commonwealth continuously for one year immedi- 
ately preceding said date of application, shall be granted under the supervision 
of the department of public welfare, in this chapter called the department. Finan- 
cial assistance granted hereunder shall be given from the date of application there- 
for, but in no event before the applicant reaches the age of seventy, and in deter- 
mining the amount of assistance to be given for any period preceding the date on 
which the application was favorably passed upon, consideration shall be given to 
the amount of welfare relief, if any, given to such applicant during said period 
under any other provision of law. Such assistance shall, wherever practicable, be 
given to the aged person in his own home or in lodgings or in a boarding home, and 
it shall be sufficient to provide such suitable and dignified care. No person receiv- 
ing assistance hereunder shall be deemed to be a pauper by reason thereof. 
(Approved August 14, 1985.) 



P.D. 17. 









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68 P.D. 17. 

Part II 

PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS 

Richard K. Conant, Commissioner 1 

Supervisors 

Miss Florence G. Dickson Miss Alice M. McIntire 

Miss Mary C. Robinson 

Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in three 
legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare to investigate all applications for charitable charters, while the second and 
third call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages of 
this part of the report the functions of the department and the year's work under 
these several statutes are explained. This statement is followed by a tabulation 
of some of the essential figures showing the financial condition and the number of 
persons aided by the various charities. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations Seeking Incorporation 

During the year ending November 30, 1935, 64 applications for charters have 
been referred to this department by the Secretary of the Commonwealth for 
investigation under General Laws (Tercentenary Edition), chapter 180, section 6. 
In 8 cases the applications were withdrawn from this department before the hear- 
ing and in 1 case the application, was withdrawn from this department after the 
hearing. One (1) case is pending action of the Secretary of State at the end of 
the year. Thirteen (13) cases are pending action of this department at the end 
of the year. This department has investigated, given hearings and reported on 
59 applications, including 17 received prior to the beginning of the year. 

Fifty-five (55) applications as listed below have been acted upon by the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth. 

American Friendship Association 

Beethoven Memorial Foundation, Incorporated 

Belmont Unemployment Emergency Committee, Inc. 

Beth Israel Hospital Women's Auxiliary, Inc. 

Boston Newspapermen's Post, No. 305, American Legion 

Brookline 101st Infantry Veterans Association Convention Inc. 

Cambridge Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc. 

Camp Alcott, Inc. 

Cape Cod Educational Foundation 

Community Federation of Boston 

Community Nurse Association of Fairhaven 

Dawn Patrol, Incorporated 

Ella Lyman Cabot Foundation 

Employees Benevolent Association, Inc. 

European Aid Society, Inc. 

Fenway Hospital, (Inc.) 

French American Auxiliary 

G. A. R. Memorial Hall Association of Duxbury, Massachusetts, Inc. 

Girl Scout Training School, Inc. 

Gore Place Society 

Greek-American Political Club of Cambridge 

Hanover Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 

Hart Community Hospital, Inc. 

Harugari Day Association of Greater Boston, Inc. 

Helena Dudley Foundation 

Hillside Incorporated 

Hingham Troop One Committee, Incorporated 

Holy Ghost Brotherhood of Charity, The 

Hope Rescue Mission, Inc. 

1 Walter V. McCarthy appointed Commissioner December 1, 1935. 



Pt. II. 69 

International Institute of Boston, Inc. 

International Institute of Greater Lawrence, The 

International Institute of Lowell, Inc. 

Italian American Civic League of Springfield 

Jewish Young Women's Social Group, Inc. 

Longyear Foundation 

Lowell Textile Associates, Inc. 

Maiden Children's Health Camp Association, Inc. 

Maiden Post 69 American Legion Building Associates, Inc. 

Martha's Vineyard Animal Rescue League, Incorporated 

Massachusetts Charitable, Rabbinical and Kashruth League, Inc. 

Massachusetts Rural Communities, Inc. 

National Unemployment Relief Association 

New England Salvage Stores for Palestine, Inc. 

New England Zionist Region 

Newtonville Library Association, Inc. 

Ostroa Ladies Helping Hand Society, Inc. 

Ring School of Psychiatric Nursing, Inc., The 

St. Mark Social Center, Inc. 

Salisbury Swimming Pool, Inc. 

Sigma Beta Iota Sorority 

Syrian Child Welfare Society, Inc., The 

West Roxbury Catholic Woman's Club 

Westwood Community Health Association 

Wilder Charitable & Educational Fund, Inc. 

World War Mothers of New England Inc. 

Fifty (50) of these applications have been acted upon and charters issued. 
Charters have been withheld from the following : 

American Friendship Association 

Fenway Hospital, (Inc.) 

Hart Community Hospital, Inc. 

Massachusetts Charitable, Rabbinical and Kashruth League, Inc. 

Sigma Beta Iota Sorority 

Inspection of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Ter. Ed.), chapter 121, section 7, requires the Department of 
Public Welfare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corporation, 
to make annual inspection or investigation of such corporation. 

One hundred forty-nine (149) inspections have been made during the past year 
involving numerous conferences with directors and many visits to institutions. 

There have been 777 inquiries in regard to particular charities and general 
matters connected with the field of private charity. 

Number and Classification of Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts 

Of the 1,269 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
during 1935, 122 are homes for the aged; 150 are child-helping agencies; 260 are 
hospitals or other institutions for aiding the sick; 131 are agencies giving family 
aid; and 206 are organizations doing community, neighborhood or club work. 
The remaining 400 corporations form a miscellaneous group chiefly civic or elee- 
mosynary in their nature. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Ter. Ed.), chapter 180, section 12, provides that every charitable 
corporation must make to this department an annual financial return on or before 
the first day of November in each year, and further provides that if any corpora- 
tion fails for two successive years to make the report, the Supreme Court may 
decree its dissolution. Figures from the financial reports of corporations for the 
last year are given on the following pages. The abstracts are arranged by towns 
in alphabetical order under each town. 



70 P.D. 17. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1935 showed the total property, real and 
personal, of all these charities to be $360,862,685. Subscriptions and donations, 
including gifts restricted to capital, brought in $14,996,661. Earnings and refunds, 
including receipts from beneficiaries, amounted to $23,527,104. Interest, divi- 
dends, annuities and rentals brought in $9,575,120. Legacies were received to the 
amount of $4,617,816; of this sum $2,337,910 was unrestricted. The current 
receipts were $49,808,426. The current expenditures were $47,361,111 of which 
$19,396,833 was paid for salaries and wages. The agencies reported 23,586 paid 
employees. 

Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organization or 
agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any such society. 
Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do not mean 
approval; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of conditions call- 
ing for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in using the fact of 
inspection in such manner as to lead the public to believe that the department 
approves or in any sense commends its work. 



72 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Abinqton 

1 Ablngton Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 

2 Abington Young Men's Christian Association . 

3 County Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations 

of Plymouth County, Massachusetts, Incorporated, The * 

Acushnbt 

4 Acushnet Instructive Nursing Association, The 

Adams 

5 Sisters of Providence (Greylock Rest) (See also Holyoke) . 

Ambsburt 

6 Amesbury and Salisbury Home for Aged Women 

7 Amesbury Hospital Association, The .... 

8 Ladies Charitable Society of Amesbury .... 

Amherst 

9 Amherst Boys Club, Inc 

10 Amherst Home for Aged Women, The .... 

11 Wilbur H. H. Ward Educational Trust, Incorporated, The 

Andovbr 

12 Andover Guild, The 

13 Andoyer Home for Aged People 

Arlington 

14 Arlington Visiting Nursing Association Inc., The 

15 Order of St. Anne (St. John's House for Children) . 

16 Sachem Council, Inc. of the Boy Scouts of America . 

17 Southern Middlesex Health Association .... 

18 Symmes Arlington Hospital (61 beds) . . 

Athol 

19 Athol Memorial Hospital (not in operation) 

20 Athol Young Men's Christian Association, The 

21 Attleboro Community Chest, Inc., The, 29 Park St. . 

22 Attleborough Hospital, The, 211 Park St. (89 beds) . 

23 Attleboro League for Girls and Women, Inc., The, 47 Bank 

St 

24 Attleboro Young Mens Christian Association, The, 63 North 

Main St. 1 

25 Family Welfare Association of Attleboro, Mass., Inc., 7 

Park St 

26 John Daggett-Frances A. Crandall Home for Aged Women, 

550 North Main St 

27 New England Deaconess Association (Attleboro Springs, 961 

Park St.) 

28 New England District of the Christian and Missionary Alli- 

ance Inc 

Auburn 

29 Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc., The 

30 Skogsblomman Society, Inc 

Avon 

31 Lutheran Children's Home, Inc. 

Ater 

32 Community Memorial Hospital (19 beds) 

33 Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, Inc., The (See 

also Maiden) 

Barnstable 

34 Cape Cod Council Boy Scouts of America, Inc. 

35 Cape Cod Hospital (45 beds) 

36 District Nursing Association of Barnstable, Yarmouth and 

Dennis, The 

37 Hyannis Normal Students Permanent Loan Fund Company, 

The 

Barrb 

38 Stetson Home 

Bedford 

39 CathoUc Foreign Mission Society of America, Inc. . 

- None. l No report. 



$834 
5,036 


$490 


$1,223 
518 


$72 


234 


- 


1,909 


185 


125,694 


100 


20,274 


- 


236,686 
9,127 
12,181 


87 
57 


810 
5 


3,866 
286 
367 


17.716 
97,072 
119,912 


1,529 
76 


r- 


168 
3,870 
4,827 


7,240 
127,282 


3,310 


369 


4,662 


3,017 
117,757 

2,571 

51,985 

219,090 


3,187 
8,770 
6,257 
7,205 
1,533 


4,251 

6,318 

238 

8,141 

77,010 


85 
400 

324 

229 


1,654 
150,388 


4,584 


4,510 


26 


30 
920,378 


33,716 
2,220 


145 
65,098 


18,290 



20,441 



93,414 



,830 



3.260 


6.339 


288 


46 


36,937 


1,365 


2,099 


847 


300,000 


651 


24,685 


302 


14,399 


1,561 


1,262 


- 


1,212 
1.873 


35 
167 


959 
137 


7 



8,465 



,219 



70 



78,214 


- 


22,130 


375 


19,735 


499 


2,861 


599 


2,355 
301,607 


4,697 
14,564 


3,517 
70,943 


6,792 


5,909 


3,878 


2,966 


191 


14.517 


48 


149 


167 


245,634 


35 


500 


11,586 


50,927 


26,829 


720 


- 


2 Not stated 


. 


* Membership. 





Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



73 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 


Service or Relief Given 












Number 






Families 




of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 
zations 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 








viduals 





$1,250 
1,100 



2,500 



300 



1,0005 
2,000 



626 ' 



50 



7,000 



$1,714 
590 



2,094 



20,374 



6,013 

1,386 

429 



4,198 
3,946 
4,827 



3,679 
4,962 



7,524 
17,488 

6,496 
15,671 
78,772 



26 



33,861 
85,663 

3,750 



9,804 



$1,753 
618 



1,970 

19,806 

4.547 



1,516 
3,117 
4,294 



3,847 
4,542 



8,368 
17,109 

7,842 
15,185 
83,282 



9,720 



37,473 
83,243 



3,628 



6,674 


6,145 


4,311 


5,528 


25,638 


34,895 


2,824 


3,516 


1,319 
304 


1,106 
220 



,491 



$681 
240 



1,944 
3,818 



578 
950 



1,877 



5,890 
3,422 
4,550 
5,812 
24,386 



5,237 



710 
42,309 



1,378 



,902 



445 



3,202 



22,505 


26,115 


12,005 


3,960 


7,795 


3,110 


8,215 
99,557 


7,378 
78,667 


2,419 
30,197 


7,035 


6,947 


4,967 


364 


317 


- 


12,122 


14,098 


- 


27,549 


16,158 


2,121 


1 Attendance. 




i 



220 



427 
625 



10C 
6 



16,742* 



4 6,070 « 

3 45 

2 1,603 ! 

JO 110 

59 2,543 



365 s 



37 



30 



310 
14 



100 3 
46 



19 # 
100 



3 
76 


1,569 


50 


3 


499 


150 


2 


_ 


_ 


4 


11 


6 


18 


245 


- 


i 


1,6078 
2 


672« 
2 



2 


568 


- 


5 


28 


- 


3 


750 s 
2,694 


3 


4 


332 


65 


- 


5 


5 



30 



137 



243 



30 



2 
300 



85 



24 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Visits. 



74 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Belmont 

1 Belmont Community Nursing Association 

Berlin 

2 Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Destitute Children 

Incorporated, The 



30 



40 



Beverly 
Beverly Female Charitable Society, The . 
Beverly Fuel Society, 246 Cabot St. 
Beverly Hebrew Community Center, Inc., 37 Bow St. 
Beverly Hospital Corporation, Herrick St. (105 beds) 
Beverly School for the Deaf, 6 Echo Ave. 

Country Week Association 

Essex County Health Association, Inc., 222 Cabot St. 
Fisher Charitable Society, 175 Cabot St. . 
Old Ladies Home Society, 78 Lothrop St. 
Young Men's Christian Association of Beverly, Mass., The, 
245 Cabot St 



BlLLERICA 

Pines Community Association, The 

Boston 

Academy of Medicine, Inc 

A. C. Ratshesky Foundation, 30 Court St. 

Adams Nervine Asylum, 990 Centre St., Jamaica Plain (36 
beds) ........ 

Agoos Family Charity Fund, The . 

Alumni Mutual Fund of Boston University School of The- 
ology, Inc., The, 72 Mt. Vernon St. . 

American Humane Education Society, The, 180 Longwood 
Ave. . 

American Invalid Aid Society, 2 Park Square . 

American Irish Pioneers Foundation 

American Ramabai Association, The 

American Unitarian Association, 25 Beacon St. 



24 American Women's Overseas League of New England, Inc 

25 Animal Rescue League of Boston, 51 Carver St. 

26 Armenian Women's Welfare Association, Inc., 190 Beacon 



Army and Navy Service Committee, Inc., 8 Fayette St. 
Associated Jewish Centers Camp, Inc., The, 7 Water St. 
Associated Jewish Philanthropies, Inc., 333 Washington St. 1 
Association for Independent Co-operative Living, 11 Nas- 
sau St 

Association for the Work of Mercy in the Diocese of Massa 

chusetts, The, 244 Townsend St., Roxbury . 
Association of Andranovites Saint Nicholas, Inc. 
Association of the Evangelical Lutheran Church for Works 

of Mercy, The, 670 Baker St., Wesfc Roxbury 1 
Auxiliary of American Jewish Women for Community Serv 

ice, Inc 

Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian and Polish Jewish 

Central Committee at Jersualem .... 
Baby Hygiene Association, 137 Newbury St. . 
Baikar Association Inc., 296^ Shawmut Ave. . 
Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc., The, 35 Temple St 
Belgian Netherland American Social and Benevolent Club 

Inc 

Beneficent Society of the New England Conservatory of 

Music, The, 294 Huntington Ave. 
BenevolentFraternity of UnitarianChurches.llBulfinch PI. 
Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches (North End 

Union) 20 Parmenter St 

Benoth Israel Sheltering Home, 6 North Russell St. . 
Bethany Union for Young Women, The, 14 Worcester St. 
Beth El Free Loan Society of Dorchester, Inc., The, 

Fowler St., Dorchester . . . . . 
Bethesda Society, 31 Mt. Vernon St. 6 
Beth Israel Hospital Association, 330 Brookline Ave. (215 

beds) 

Board of Ministerial Aid, The, 14 Beacon St. . 

Boston and Maine Railroad Employees' Fund, Incorporated, 

150 Causeway St 

Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society, 15 Ashburton 

Place 



$11,134 



5,000 



$1,846 



5,166 


207 


28,244 


- 


148 


3,285 


807,435 


20,363 


207,545 


899 


25 


3,325 


849 


10,289 


69,927 


- 


230,059 


42"8 



240,900 



2,955 



54 



$2,039 



910 

126,874 

58,744 

185 

4,407 

1,240 

10,464 

343 



$332 



195 



34,423 
2,119 



3,374 
10,378 



305,882 


368 


43 


6,531 


1,028,100 
169,017 


- 


15,595 


38,260 
8,383 


36,409 


305 


3,754 


882 


446,551 

8,795 

35 

5,953 

8,051,090 


250 

1,808 

76 
38,014 


2,133 


17,594 
212 

157 

276,766 


69 
1,242,453 


169 
10,473 


33,056 


41,756 


29,040 
12,689 


6,395 
38 


291 
15,102 


- 


35,301 


214 


15,593 


14 


116,604 
286 


11,906 
11 


1,491 


1,863 
10 



18 

92,522 

26,950 

384 


3,123 
14,726 


26,900 
9,658 


4,214 


5,225 


284 


154 


81 


19,692 
828,431 


253 
2,550 


265 


838 
35,717 


441 

' 50,224 

43,031 


12,923 
1,132 
1,283 


438 
11,062 


688 
1,482 


7,692 
136,531 


488 
6,453 


24,336 
4,591 


4,869 


2,359,933 
105,069 


195,381 
21,205 


298,722 
25 


5,148 


98,590 


- 


- 


1 


270,668 


23,943 


- 


3,775 


2 Membership. 




3 Not stated. 





None. 



1 No report. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



75 



Continued 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



500 



1,000 



219 



$4,219 



18,953 



419 



6,942 



$4,647 



22,670 



621 



12,536 



$3,390 



- 


402 


506 


_ 


- 


1,303 


1,215 


28 


— 


4,196 


4,349 


1,771 


$26,215 


205,876 


188,074 


85,076 


1,660 


63,423 


52,880 


31,047 


- 


3,510 


3,695 


1,311 


- 


14,696 


14,565 


5,303 


150 


3,524 


3,590 


600 


1,150 


13,197 


7,984 


3,310 



10,808 



17,862 


53,856 
26,246 


62,606 
7.417 


35,077 


- 


4,943 


3,825 


- 


3,097 
5,000 


23,074 
7,021 


25,228 
2,837 


17,698 
1,127 


69,807 «\ 
9,558 / 

24,757 4 \ 
173,021 J 


234 

323,767 
169 

258,307 


143 

328,221 
176 

103,314 


38,734 
59,596 


- 


6,687 
15,140 


6,736 
11,152 


4,957 
2,844 


- 


15,822 


15,652 


4,804 


- 


15,286 
21 


15,551 
79 


6,500 



3,123 

4,214 

41,627 

9,658 


3,105 

4,214 

40,781 

10,975 


1,627 

20,963 
4,327 


520 


438 


- 


1,356 
37,733 


2,155 
38,012 


29,859 


14,050 

1,132 

14,329 


13,711 

1,042 

15,362 


10,335 
5,554 


24,824 
16,724 


24,956 
19,920 


9,903 


494,104 
26,379 


509,229 
25,454 


234,959 


1 


150 


- 


27,938 


26,812 


18,187 


ricted to capital. 


5 Report not due. 



6012 



,430 



548 



_ 


_ 


- 


60 


_ 


_ 


- 


98 


5 


_ 


_ 


125 


91 


5,183 


279 


- 


30 


91 


- 


- 


9 


198 


198 


- 


2 


68 


2 


- 


1 


72 


72 


74 


4 


11 


- 


- 



42 


114 


33 


- 


106 


106 


15 

1 


_s 
179 


179 


- 


2,000 


2,000 


30 


209 
13 


209 
13 


43 


_3 




5 

25 


17,594 
269 


17,145 


7 


102 


3 


7 


191 
1 


156 

1 



582 



_3 


1,270 


370 


8 


35 


- 


10 


265 
132 


265 
112 


50 


9,570 
107 


2,052 
107 


- 


31 


31 


20 


_3 


_s 



100 



25 



60 



249 



166 



Name changed to Orchard Home School. 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Boston— Con. 

1 Boston Baptist Social Union, 15 Ashburton Place . . $6,371 

2 Boston Branch, Baron de Hirsch Fund, 24 Province St. . 8,920 

3 Boston Branch of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, 

Inc., 30 Kenilworth St. Roxbury 44,102 

4 Boston Children's Aid Society, 41 Mt. Vernon St. . . 788,424 

5 Boston Children's Friend Society, 45 Rutland St. . . 459,938 

6 Boston City Hospital, The, 818 Harrison Ave. (1,974 beds) 17,300,783 

7 Boston Community Centre, Inc., of the Volunteers of 

America, 25 Hanover St 

8 Boston Council, Inc.. Boy Scouts of America, 38 Chauncy St. 5 

9 Boston Council of Girl Scouts, 280 Dartmouth St. . . 24,740 

10 Boston Dispensary, The, 25 Bennet St. (20 beds) . . 739,120 

11 Boston Educational Association for Deaf Children . . 3,145 

12 Boston Episcopal Charitable Society, The . . . 195,987 

13 Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society . . . . 263,639 

14 Boston Fire Department Band, Inc. l 

15 Boston Floating Hospital, The, 20 Ash St. (50 beds) . 1,143,005 

16 Boston Health League, Incorporated, 43 Tremont St. . 2,028 

17 Boston Home for Incurables, The, 2049 Dorchester Ave., 

Dorchester . . 1,765,030 

18 Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc. . . 93 

19 Boston Industrial Home, 17 Davis St 96,023 

20 Boston Ladies Bethel Society, 332 Hanover St. . . 51 

21 Boston Lakeshore Home 47,710 

22 Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society, 43 South St. . 110,982 

23 Boston Legal Aid Society, The, 16A Ashburton Place . 123,522 

24 Boston Lions Club Edward E. Allen Recreational Camps 

Inc 1,101 

25 Boston Lying-in Hospital, 221 Longwood Ave. (232 beds) . 3,774,149 

26 Boston Marine Society, The, 88 Broad St. 358,035 

27 Boston Music School Settlement, Inc., The, 41 Allen St. . 9,194 

28 Boston Nursery for Blind Babies, 147 South Huntington Ave. 652,297 

29 Boston Pilots' Relief Society, 470 Atlantic Ave. . . 306,934 

30 Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Managers of, 11 

North Square . 747,483 

31 Boston Provident Association, 41 Hawkins St. . . . 366,046 

32 Boston Public School Teachers' Retirement Fund, 15 Bea- 

con St . . 1,664,593 

33 Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Inc., 7 Harcourt St. 18,629 

34 Boston Seaman's Friend Society (Incorporated) . . 365,136 

35 Boston Section Council of Jewish Women . . . 3,898 

36 Boston Society for the Care of Girls, The, 41 Mt. Vernon St. 498,405 

37 Boston Society of Optometrists, Incorporated ... 86 

38 Boston Tuberculosis Association, 554 Columbus Ave. . 206,157 

39 BostonUnitedMoathChitimAssociation,The,24ProvinceSt. 118 

40 Boston Urban League, Inc., 20 Whittier St. ... 521 

41 Boston Veteran Journalists' Benevolent Association, Inc. . 2,482 

42 Boston Wesleyan Association, 581 Boylston St. . . 606,705 

43 Boston Work Horse Relief Association, 109 Northampton St. 112,406 
44^ Boston Young Men's Christian Association, 316 Huntington 

Ave 2,747,239 

45 Boston Young Men's Christian Association, Trustees of the, 

316 Huntington Ave 623,321 

46 Boston Young Men's Christian Union, 48 Boylston St. . 2,063,707 

47 Boston Young Women's Christian Association, 140 Claren- 

don St 2,290,922 

48 Boston Zezmer Association Inc 320 

49 Boys' Clubs of Boston Incorporated, The, 15 Green St., 

Charlestown 964,484 

50 Brigham Hospital (not in operation) . . . . 1,165 

51 British Charitable Society, 5 Park Sq 69,941 

52 Brooke House, 79 Chandler St. 1 

53 Brothers of Charity, Inc., The, 11 Perkins St., Jamaica Plain 20,852 

54 Burnap Free Home for Aged Women, 38 Pleasant St., Dor- 

chester 419,093 

55 Burrage Hospital Association (not in operation) . . 74,698 

56 Butrimantz Social & Aid Association .... 315 

57 Calvary Rescue Mission, Inc., 12 Marshall St. . . . 625 

58 Camp Dorchester Association Incorporated . . . 3,624 

59 Cape Cod Association l 

60 Carney Hospital, 39 Old Harbor St., South Boston (150 

beds) 268,550 

- None. 1 No report. 2 Restricted to capital. 



$3,300 



11,087 
14,291 


$20,306 


17,757 
3,551,553 


14,182 
300,347 


- 


25,140 


11,588 
123,360 


98 
102,099 


900 
3,136 


- 


28,168 
5,662 


- 


382 

94 

6,315 

138 


11,875 

75 

6,197 


1,600 
22,054 


12,560 


1,054 
18,798 
6,333 
3,631 
35 
3,576 


330 

278,095 

381 

4,115 

768 

6,832 


2,400 
87,645 


3,714 
2,096 


5,115 
19,128 


72,752 
14,994 
11,413 


3,907 
2,139 


3,472 
2,394 


330 

27,040 
6,221 
5,509 
88 
22,100 
1,344 


473 
7,836 

1,659 

8,915 
1,720 


77,722 


980,679 


41,237 


25,591 


89,497 


342,928 



76,092 



500 

8,576 

264 

247 

1,655 

529 



3,259 



522 



474 
1,299 



143,819 



$36,000 
261 

1,746 
39,465 

20,760 
3,892 



1,290 

16,083 

150 

7,774 
11,351 

41,251 



56,687 

2,148 
1 
1,808 
4,574 
14,468 

48 
58,744 
17,705 

25,295 
15,836 

28,915 
22,857 

68,169 

15,723 

37 
23,696 

1 

3,760 



21,373 



5 Reported under Children's Aid Association. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



77 



Continued 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Service or Relief Given 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 
zations 






tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 


viduals 
Free 


sive of 
Indi- 




















viduals 








$39,300 


$35,452 


$21,545 




25 


3,000 


3,000 




4 


! 


~ 


261 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


$467 


13,300 


13,437 


4,916 


_ 


13 


_ 


_ 


6 


_ 


3 


/ 2,092 2 
\ 838 


74,901 




















81,308 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


_3 


_3 


- 


4 


2,593 


55,364 


54,763 


17,267 


- 


12 


498 


-4 


204 


33 


5 


968 


3*,856,761 


3,516,528 


2,016,161 


- 


2,333 


217,783 


205,125 


- 


- 


6 


- 


25,140 


30,127 


11,174 


- 


30 


-4 


_4 


- 


- 


7 
8 
9 


15' 


12,977 


12,295 


7,390 


_ 


5 


2,0006 


_< 


_ 


_ 


1,956 2 


242,961 


246,362 


145,696 


- 


148 


25,069 


10,914 


- 


- 


10 


- 


150 


174 


174 


- 


4 


25 


25 


- 


- 


11 


- 


8,674 


7,302 


275 


_ 


2 


_4 


-i 


- 


- 


12 


10,000 2 


14,487 


15,834 


- 


- 


- 


125 


125 


- 


- 


13 
14 
15 


18,663 2 


69,419 


79,100 


28,227 


_ 


28 


1,145 


1,145 


_ 


_ 


- 


5,662 


5,384 


4,140 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


16 


11,383 


80,478 


63,011 


34,699 


_ 


43 


75 


35 


_ 


_ 


17 


- 


169 


132 


- 


- 


- 


_4 


-4 




- 


18 


2,500 


17,161 


17,822 


4,983 


2 


14 


13,747 


5,026 


27 


- 


19 


- 


139 


119 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


20 


- 


1,808 


1,833 


100 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


21 


- 


6,174 


9,127 


260 


- 


1 


21 


21 


- 


- 


22 


10,515 


51,248 


44,418 


36,656 


- 


24 


11,096 


7,595 


- 


8 


23 


- 


1,437 


1,937 


742 


_ 


6 


26 


14 


_ 


„ 


24 


4,083 


359,721 


354,373 


136,416 


- 


213 


5,095 


1,323 


- 


- 


25 


- 


24,419 


23,217 


3,600 


2 


- 


118 


118 


— 


- 


26 


- 


7,746 


7,149 


5,972 


- 


17 


246 


13 


- 


— 


27 


1,791 2 


26,098 


25,517 


12,937 


- 


13 


36 


23 


- 


- 


28 


- 


26,245 


22,259 


300 


2 


- 


22 


22 


- 


- 


29 


- 


35,030 


26,088 


12,273 


2 


12 


7,312 


4,232 


22 


5 


30 


500 ■' 


112,599 


114,975 


25,193 


- 


11 


- 


- 


1,362 


19 


31 


- 


140,902 


56,089 


890 


1 


1 


350 


_ 


_ 


_ 


32 


/ 487 
[ 14,511 


20,129 
} 60,776 


20,052 


15,136 


- 


15 


54 


22 


- 


- 


33 


47,234 


22,705 


2 


15 


21,914 


5,311 


_ 


_ 


34 


- 


7,417 


7,348 


- 


- 


— 


-i 




i - 


6 


35 


/ 1,000 
\ 12,592 


I 

/ 40,822 




















34,558 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


! 


j 


36 


- 


805 


942 


383 


- 


2 


118 


18 


- 


- 


37 


6,811 


38,637 


40,995 


24,470 


- 


24 


5,325 


5,269 


968 


3 


38 


- 


6,221 


6,113 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,500 


- 


39 


- 


7,227 


7,632 


4,160 


- 


2 


_ 


_ 


i 


- 


40 


- 


141 


267 


— 


- 


- 


2 


2 


_ 


- 


41 


- 


87,249 


76,173 


29,508 


1 


20 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


42 


18,500 


25,201 


7,029 


4,984 


1 


2 


_4 


_ 


i _ 


- 


43 


5,000 


1,079,775 


1,090,027 


641,258 


- 


476 


51,218 


29,602 


- 


- 


44 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


45 


/ 2,000 
\ 10,000 


J 98,142 




















97,177 


35,718 


- 


34 


5,197 


2,109 


- 


85 


46 


J 2,000 
\ 8,364 


I 




















/ 459,687 


469,013 


262,097 


- 


258 


24,506 


- 


4 


- 


47 


- 


- 


130 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


1 


48 


/ 300 
I 5,771 


\ 




















/ 92,444 


93,377 


65,870 


- 


47 


12,826 


s _ 


- 


- 


49 


— 


— 


23 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


- 


3,954 


3,950 


600 


- 


1 


523 


523 


237 


- 


51 
52 
53 


- 


8,576 


1,479 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


100 


2 18,951 


15,027 


6,414 


_ 


5 


25 


25 


_ 


_ 


54 


- 


1,106 


2,690 


780 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


55 


- 


722 


805 


50 


1 


- 


- 


- 


65 


5 


56 


467 


2,145 


1,998 


350 


- 


1 


56,931 


' 56,931 


7 17 


- 


57 


~ 


1,829 


1,744 


468 


- 


10 


79 


19 


- 


4 


58 
59 


17,151 


167,267 


164,440 


61,763 


_ 


179 


13,095 


3,570 


_ 


_ 


60 




» Not stated. 




i Report not due. 


6 Membership. 


7 


Attendance. 







P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Boston— Con. 

1 Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Ine., 39 Old Harbor 

South Boston 

2 Channing Home, in Boston, 198 Pilgrim Rd. . 

3 Charitable Irish Society, The, 40 Court St. 

4 Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop, 1 Vila St. . 

5 Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of the . 

6 Charles H. Hood Fund, 500 Rutherford Ave. . 

7 Charles Irwin Travelli Fund, The . 

8 Charlestown Charity Fund, Trustees of the 

9 Charlestown Poor's Fund, Trustees of the 1 

10 Charlotte Cushman Club of Boston, The, 1 Marlborough St 

11 Chevra Schass of Boston, Inc., 45 Intervale St., Roxbury 

12 Children's Aid Association (Unincorporated), 41 Mt. Ver 

non St. . 

Children's Hospital, The, 300 Longwood Ave. (269 beds) 
Children's Mission to Children, The, 20 Ashburton Place 
Children's Museum of Boston, Olmsted Park, Jamaica Plain 
Chinese Mission of New England, 16 Oxford St. x . 
Christopher Shop, Inc., The, 93 Massachusetts Ave. . 
Church Home Society for the Care of Children of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church, The, 41 Mt. Vernon St, 
City Misssionary Society, 14 Beacon St. . 

Clara C. Hyams Fund, Inc., 49 Federal St . 

Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston, The, 376 West 

Fourth St., South Boston .... 
Commonwealth Charitable Corporation . 
Community Health Association, 137 Newbury St. 
Community Service of Boston, Inc., 739 Boylston St. 
Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachusetts, The, 102 

Bowdoin St 

Congregation Tikvos Yisroel and New Dorchester Hebrew 

School 1 

Consumers' League of Massachusetts (Inc.), 31A Mt. Ver 

non St 

Consumptives' Home, Trustees of the 

Cooperative Workrooms, Inc., 36 Washington St. 

Council for Greater Boston Camp Fire Girls, 100 Boylston St 

Craigie Foundation, The, 176 Marlborough St. 1 

Daly Industrial School, The, 111 Train St., Dorchester 

Deaconess' Aid Society of New England . 

Dean Foundation for Little Children, Inc. 

Denison House, 93 Tyler St 

Deutsches Altenheim, Incorporated, 2222 Centre St., West 

Roxbury 

37 Devens Benevolent Society .... 

38 Diocesan Board of Missions, 1 Joy St. x . 

39 Directory, Inc., The (for Mothers' Milk), 221 Longwood Ave 

40 Disabled Ex-Service Men's Exchange, Inc., 355 Boylston St, 

41 Disabled Veterans Hospital Service Inc., 376 Boylston St 

42 Dorchester House, Incorporated, 7 Gordon Place, Dor 

Chester 

43 Durant Incorporated, The .... 

44 East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc. . 

45 Eastern Star of Massachusetts Charitable Foundation, Inc 

46 Edward Hatch Memorial, Inc. x . . . 

47 Elizabeth Peabody House Association, The, 357 Charles St 

48 Ell en M . Giff ord Sheltering Home Corporation, The, 20 Un- 

dine Rd., Brighton 

49 Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc., 66 Berkeley St 

50 Emergency Planning and Research Bureau, Inc., 182 Tre- 

mont St. . 

51 Employees' Fund, Incorporated .... 

52 Episcopal City Mission , The, 1 Joy St. . 

53 Eretz Israel Aid Society, 20 Charlotte St., Dorchester 

54 Evangelistic Association of New England, 88 Tremont St, 

55 Faith and Hope Association, The, 73 Tremont St. 

56 Family Welfare Society of Boston, 41 Hawkins St. 

57 Farm and Trades School, The, Thompson's Island 

58 Fathers and Mothers Club, The, 68 Devonshire St. 

59 Faulkner Hospital Corporation, The, 1153 Centre St., Ja- 

maica Plain (143 beds) .... 

60 Federated Jewish Charities of Boston 1 . 

61 Fellowcrafters Guild, 165 Newbury St. 6 . 

62 First-Spiritualist-Ladies Aid Society of Boston 



$8,648 

338,641 

18,059 

48,051 

77,734 

125,318 

1,755 

8,279 


$475 
2,400 
3,084 

9,343 
51,500 


$75 
9,745 
2,320 
24,921 


56,116 
6,001 


25,499 
662 


4,986 


7,187 

6,925,991 

950,423 

91,230 


162,702 

114,829 

25,640 

12,159 


227,958 

4,574 

187 


17,414 


8,371 


7,578 


295,372 
429,082 


40,318 
22,055 


16,526 
6,473 


1,423,820 


- 


- 


14,987 


773 


- 


804,117 
15,944 


105,093 
27,677 


116,052 
2,675 



301,893 



1,512 



65 
65,333 
10,067 
25,755 


3,826 

39,397 
5,915 


25,977 
17,571 


84,358 
23,933 

415,194 
53,419 


1,863 
763 

15,171 


13,780 
98 

2,959 


1,074,686 
2,215 


719 


8,935 


30,382 

17,713 

8,981 


5,2fll 
6,577 
7,548 


18,674 
20,833 


47,344 

560,248 

6,869 

321,870 


3,478 

213 

358 

30,162 


159 

22 

12,657 

4,725 


161,745 


23,882 


12,027 


2.03,893 
51,496 


1,153 
19,245 


5,220 


31,733 

90,193 

1,191,417 

195 

7,028 

14,500 

876,634 


59,749 

37,958 

59 

11,842 

3,886 

364,208 


366 

20,379 
57 

2,069 
6,070 


747,358 
24,924 

1,460,673 


9,671 
246 

m 

17,280 


10,239 
286 
P 

224,587 



$6 

12,236 

3 

1,423 

3,472 

7,470 

23 

276 

300 



193,150 

34,682 

4,479 



13,838 
15,115 



41,703 
15,075 



2,698 
100 



2,896 

1,036 

11,938 

60 

34,660 
71 

76 

2,698 

121 

2,198 



526 

749 

7,501 



3,668 
35,424 

221 

25,548 

32,806 
618 



346 



77 



34 



None. 



1 No report. 



s Not stated. 



3 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



79 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



and 

Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 





$557 


$576 








_2 


_2 




1 


1 


$500 


24,881 


23,390 


$12,465 


- 


12 


75 


13 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5,408 


5,698 


1,300 


1 


- 


4 


4 


— 


12 


3 


- 


26,344 


26,232 


18,256 


- 


12 


_2 


_2 


— 


- 


4 


- 


3,472 


3,262 


200 


1 


- 


6 


6 


- 


2 


5 


- 


16,813 


6,454 


- 


- 


- 


128 


128 


127 


- 


6 


- 


51,523 


52,942 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


219 


7 


- 


276 


81 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


- 


- 


8 
9 
10 


_ 


30,786 


7,602 


753 


_ 


2 


26 


21 


_ 


_ 


- 


662 


677 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


_ 


162,702 


158,658 


62,310 


_ 


38 


1,109 


874 


_ 


_ 


12 


105,373* 


508,137 


508,370 


256,948 


- 


321 


23,542 


-2 


- 


- 


13 


51,138 


116,035 


64,734 


23,583 


- 


15 


492 


336 


- 


5 


14 


5,000 


21,826 


16,763 


12,625 


- 


6 


147,500* 


_2 


- 


- 


15 

16 
17 


- 


15,971 


15,015 


4,333 


- 


4 


261 


261 


- 


4 


1,4433 


70,689 


77,116 


24,408 


_ 


21 


239 


58 


137 


3 


18 


/ 3,500 «\ 
I 1,477 / 


45,122 


53,045 


29,149 


1 


56 


492 


241 


651 


1 


19 




82,242 


109,825 


1,673 


2 


2 


1 


- 


- 


41 


20 


2,000 


2,773 


2,120 


676 


- 


3 


51 


51 


36 


1 


21 

22 
23 


48,378 


311,228 


296,931 


265,698 


_ 


154 


39,821 


_2 


_ 


_ 


4,000 


34,352 


31,071 


10,934 


- 


6 


_3 


_3 


- 


_3 


24 


338 


16,926 


18,953 


710 


2 


2 


69 


69 


- 


- 


25 
26 
27 




3,826 


4,411 


3,114 




2 










- 


2,698 


3,794 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


28 


- 


65,494 


60,466 


18,281 


- 


7 


414 


414 


- 


1 


29 


- 


23,495 


22,030 


6,654 


- 


16 


2,350 


300 


- 


" 


30 
31 

32 


_ 


18,490 


18,624 


2,716 


_ 


3 


146 


5 


_ 


_ 


- 


1,898 


2,180 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


33 


- 


11,938 


17,911 


1,250 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 


34 


2,000 


20,181 


17,110 


10,163 


- 


10 


748 


246 


290 


2 


35 


_ 


44,339 


21,878 


6,091 


2 


7 


38 


_ 


2 


_ 


36 


- 


71 


238 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


- 


- 


37 
38 


- 


23,951 


22,003 


7,328 


- 


5 


207 


59 


37 


6 


39 


- 


30,109 


28,635 


6,379 


- 


3 


266 


266 


- 


- 


40 


1,002 


8,671 


6,201 


1,381 


- 


1 


_2 


_2 


- 


- 


41 


_ 


5,908 


5,831 


3,996 


_ 


18 


625 


75 


_ 


_ 


42 


- 


236 


361 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


43 


- 


13,016 


12,818 


152 


1 


- 


- 


- 


200 


2 


44 


4113 


32,670 


33,061 


10,149 


1 


9 


34 


- 


- 


- 


45 
46 
47 


3,4063 


36,659 


36,611 


20,905 


- 


25 


3,000 


2,500 


- 


- 


_ 


8,655 


7,540 


3,040 


1 


4 


1,783 5 


1,783 5 


_ 


_ 


48 


1,000 


25,465 


25,570 


15,850 


- 


12 


700 


- 


- 


5 


49 


_ 


60,116 


48,560 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


350 


_ 


50 


- 


3,668 


2,845 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


3 


- 


51 


212,7003 


92,962 


85,806 


39,387 


- 


60 


_2 


_2 


_2 


- 


52 


- 


117 


128 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


2 


53 


500 


12,566 


11,711 


5,150 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


- 


5,955 


5,976 


788 


- 


5 


559 


110 


- 


- 


55 


/ 5,2683\ 
I 1,250 / 






















396,077 


393,230 


120,682 


- 


78 


- 


- 


5,883 


- 


56 


2,5003 


52,717 


64,052 


28,060 


- 


26 


120 


25 


- 


- 


57 


- 


1,156 


737 


271 


1 


3 


54 


54 


- 


- 


58 


/ 3,240 3\ 
\ 8,017 / 






















258,657 


263,668 


100,608 


- 


127 


4,561 


750 


- 


- 


59 
60 


- 


126 


296 


- 


- 


- 


_2 


_2 


- 


- 


61 
02 



4 Attendance. 



5 Animals. 



8 Report not due. 



80 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Namh and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Boston— Con. 

1 Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, 88 Tremont St. 

2 Forest Hills General Hospital, Incorporated, 41 Morton 

St., Jamaica Plain (109 beds) 

3 Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children, 140 The Fenway 

(12 beds) 

4 Foundation for Temperance Education, Inc., The 

5 Fragment Society, The ....... 

6 Frances E. Willard Settlement, 45 Milk St. . 

7 Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc., 50 Beacon St., Hyde Park 

8 Franklin Square House, The, 11 East Newton St. 

9 Franklin Typographical Society . 

10 Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation, The 

11 Frederika Home, Inc., 65 Deaconess Rd. 

12 Freeman L. Lowell Memorial Hospital and Dispensary, 2A 

MilfordSt. . ... ._ _ . 

13 French Benevolent and Relief Association 

14 French Women's Christian Association, 28 Appleton St. . 

15 General Alliance of Unitarian and Other Liberal Christian 

Women, 25 Beacon St 

16 George H. and Irene L. Walker Home for Children, Incor- 

porated 

17 German Aid Society of Boston, The, 35 Chardon St. . 

18 German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston, 2222 Centre St., 

West Roxbury 

19 Girls' Friendly Society Home 

20 Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of Massachusetts, 

Inc., The, 29 Fairfield St 

21 Good Will House Association, 177 Webster St. East Boston 

22 Greater Boston Bikur Cholim Hospital, 45 Townsend St., 

Roxbury (34 beds) 

23 Greenwood Church Community House Inc., 386 Washing- 

ton St., Dorchester . . . . 

24 Grosberg Family Charity Fund, Inc 

25 Guild of St. Apollonia, Inc., The 

26 Guild of St. Elizabeth, The, 27 Dudley St., Roxbury 

27 Habit Clinic for Child Guidance, Inc., 48 Rutland St. 

28 Hahnemann Hospital (not in operation) .... 

29 Hairenik Association, 13 Shawmut St 

30 Hale House Association, 12 Davis St 

31 Hand and Hand Ladies Society of Mattapan, Inc., 800 

Morton St., Mattapan 

32 Harriet Tubman House, Inc., 25 Holyoke St. . 

33 Harry E. Burroughs Newsboys Foundation, Inc., The, 10 

Somerset St. 6 

34 Hebrew Free Loan Society, The, 532 Warren St., Roxbury 

35 Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The, 43 Tremont St. 

36 Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association of Roxbury, 646 

Warren St., Roxbury 

37 Hebrew Ladies' Moshev Zekainim Association, 21 Queen 

St., Dorchester 

38 Hebrew Sheltering Home Association of Roxbury, 532 War- 

ren St., Roxbury 

39 Hebrew Women's Sewing Society, 24 Province St. . 

40 Hecht Neighborhood House Incorporated, 160 American 

Legion Highway, Dorchester 

41 Helping Hand Sisters Association of East Boston Inc., 

The. . . 

42 Helping Hand Society "Dania" 

43 Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society, Boston, Fulda 

and Ellis Sts., Roxbury ..... 

44 Home for Aged Colored Women, The, 22 Hancock St. 

45 Home for Aged Couples, 2055 Columbus Ave., Roxbury . 

46 Home for Aged Men, 133 West Springfield St. . 

47 Home for Aged Women, 205 South Huntington Ave. 

48 Home for Destitute Catholic Children, 788 Harrison Ave. . 

49 HomeforItalianChildren,Inc.,1125CentreSt., JamaicaPlain 

50 Home for Jewish Children 

51 Home Makers Association of Massachusetts, 30 Hunt- 

ington Ave 

52 Household Nursing Association, The, 222 Newbury St. 

53 House of the Angel Guardian, Trustees of the, 11 Perkins 

St., Jamaica Plain 

54 House of the Good Samaritan, 25 Binney St. (80 beds) 

55 House of the Good Shepherd, 841 Huntington Ave. . 

56 Howard Benevolent Society, 14 Beacon St 



$685,127 



$22,438 



$12,846 



$12,751 



None. 



1 No report. 



295,633 


- 


88,251 


- 


88,543 
6,875 

58,610 
325,167 
260,888 
797,587 

88,771 
756,448 
258,343 


11,310 

2,569 

26,710 

68 

33,414 

3,328 

1,000 


54,126 

66,479 

660 

203,022 

2,218 


111,382 

372 

2,411 

11,633 
14,023 
3,502 
27,469 
12,527 


110,315 

493 

4,763 


10,162 
176 


1,727 
107 


62 


319,795 


21,083 


- 


15,113 


71,456 


412 


- 


4,021 


35,898 
38,074 


333 
1,247 


579 
4,409 


1,521 
751 


93,560 
19,669 


6,867 
15,676 


15,440 
165 


137 
158 


69,860 


10,942 


25,153 


296 


40,117 

109,580 

405 

14,406 

1,589 

85,239 

51,679 

116,412 


128 

6,551 
1,043 
7,034 

18,667 
9,884 


4,023 

1,492 

2,026 

84 

40,587 
2,609 


4,500 

16 

4,919 

4,065 


255 
14,116 


279 

4,344 


371 
1,037 


50 


504,397 

94,354 

327 


37,961 
9,386 
1,488 


2,853 

236,945 

1,126 


15 
178 


23,042 


1,686 


30,904 


104 


892,008 


94,375 


31,761 


2,018 


10,470 


- 


- 


272 


69,025 


7,611 


2,300 


1,515 


602 

94 


220 
40 


465 
46 


8 
2 


74 
293,998 


1,672 
1,313 


4,378 
117 


11.716 


2,435,798 

1,772,489 

2,496,181 

875,153 

172,634 

110,101 


218 
3,123 
2,585 
7,323 
7,191 
1,377 


11,496 

381 

23,474 

17,831 
18 


94,242 
52,365 
73,808 
24,854 
315 


4 
128,113 


366 
7,116 


17,559 


5,916 


568,573 

1,127,438 

958,745 

556,421 


27,309 

46,797 

6,231 


57,983 
9,053 
67,122 


436 
25,225 

17,172 


icted to capiti 


tl. 


3 Not stated. 





Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



81 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Service or Relief Given 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 
zations 






tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 














ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 




















viduals 






/ $10,693 « 
\ 22,917 


J $70,952 


$52,886 


$28,385 




21 


400 


94 




67 


1 


- 


88,598 


88,891 


30,669 


- 


68 


1,476 


46 


- 


- 


2 


- 


176,819 


182,100 


117,178 


1 


88 


21,835 


90 


_ 


_ 


3 


- 


372 


372 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


4,980 


6,522 


- 


- 


- 


886 


886 


- 


- 


5 


2,8752 


93,963 


94,816 


31,320 


- 


45 


427 


18 


- 


- 


6 


100 


12,499 


10,217 


4,878 


1 


5 


9 


- 


- 


- 


7 


- 


250,531 


242,605 


137,973 


- 


140 


3,997 




i 


- 


8 


- 


6,831 


7,062 


75 


3 


- 


56 


56 


- 


- 


9 


- 


27,878 


31,987 


3,850 


3 


- 


53 


53 


22 


17 


10 


- 


15,745 


11,167 


2,856 


- 


2 


12 


2 


- 


- 


11 


- 


11,890 


12,035 


2,921 


- 


8 


9,503 


2,145 


- 


- 


12 
13 


- 


346 


582 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


_3 


- 


- 


14 


- 


35,266 


32,419 


5,500 


. - 


_3 


_3 


_3 


- 


- 


15 


- 


4,434 


4,427 


720 


- 


1 


149 


149 


- 


- 


16 
17 


_ 


2,433 


1,690 


200 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


31 


_ 


18 


- 


6,608 


6,238 


1,346 


- 


12 


178 


- 


- 


- 


19 


_ 


22,921 


22,978 


4,083 


_ 


8 


_s 


_3 


_ 


_ 


20 


- 


10,500 


9,742 


6,928 


- 


8 


806* 


806* 


- 


- 


21 


34 » 


31,280 


31,433 


14,674 


- 


21 


67 


38 


- 


- 


22 


_ 


4,160 


4,224 


1,474 


_ 


2 


8005 


_3 


20 


_ 


23 


- 


4,500 


4,325 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


31 


24 


- 


8,110 


9,535 


2,498 


- 


2 


_3 


_3 


_ 


_ 


25 


4,254 


7,340 


4,385 


1,705 


- 


3 


88 


41 


36 


_ 


26 


- 


7,118 


7,499 


6,310 


- 


6 


325 


297 


_ 


_ 


27 


- 


4,919 


1,465 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


28 


- 


59,255 


59,616 


21,464 


- 


18 


_3 


_3 


_ 


_ 


29 


- 


16,559 


21,446 


8,633 


- 


10 


650 


225 


- 


- 


30 


« 


701 


704 


5 


1 


_ 


95 


95 


_ 


_ 


31 


- 


5,382 


4,737 


360 


- 


1 


820 


300 


15 


11 


32 


- 


40,911 


47,302 


20,164 


_ 


30 


2,832 


1,500 


_ 


_ 


33 


917 


247,428 


244,938 


7,415 


1 


4 


2,074 


2,074 


_ 


_ 


34 


100 


2,714 


5,431 


3,960 


1 


2 


9,624 


9,624 


- 


- 


35 


- 


32,695 


32,717 


1,056 


- 


2 


- 


- 


601 


- 


36 


5,289 


119,440 


92,516 


28,074 


- 


35 


267 


- 


- 


- 


37 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


245 


245 


_ 


_ 


38 


- 


272 


272 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


39 


- 


11,426 


11,402 


7,997 


1 


15 


_3 


_3 




- 


40 


_ 


693 


428 


5 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


42 


_ 


41 


- 


90 


128 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


10 


- 


42 


_ 


6,050 


5,989 


1,423 


_ 


4 


38 


7 


_ 


_ 


43 


/ 1,000 
\ 1,237 


J 14,384 




















12,681 


3,076 


- 


7 


82 


82 


_ 


1 


44 


7,913 


113,869 


79,790 


25,018 


2 


26 


126 




_ 




45 


5,744 


62,445 


69,528 


22,353 


1 


24 


163 


115 


_ 


3 


46 


- 


99,867 


103,536 


29,247 


2 


40 


255 


_ 


_ 




47 


24,966 


57,144 


65,031 


18,351 


- 


25 


1,723 


1,723 


_ 


_ 


48 


- 


25,338 


20,883 


4,320 


- 


9 


83 


56 


- 


_ 


46 


2,687 


4,083 


5,597 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


5C 


_ 


366 


368 


_ 


_ 


_ 


97 


97 


20 


_ 


51 


500 


31,092 


27,556 


13,963 


- 


27 


2,400 


131 




- 


52 


7,493 


93,222 


84,485 


9,526 


_ 


7 


300 


167 


_ 


_ 


53 


15,400 


2 78,227 


81,931 


45,089 


- 


50 


500 


414 


_ 


_ 


54 


10,000 


83,354 


81,695 


14,779 


- 


10 


723 


685 


_ 


_ 


5t 


~ 


17,172 


34,406 


2,225 


1 


1 


~ 


- 


778 


1 


5( 



« Membership. 



'•> Attendance. 



6 Report for 16 months. 



82 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Boston— Con. 

1 Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

The, 1 Court St 

2 Hunt Asylum for Destitute Children .... 

3 Huntington Institute for Orphan Children, The 

4 Independent Zviller Free Loan Association, Inc. 

5 Industrial Aid Society, 35 Chardon St. 2 . 

6 Industrial Defense Association, Inc., The, 136 Federal St. . 

7 Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed Children, 

The, 214 St. Botolph St 

8 Industrial School for Girls, 232 Centre St., Dorchester 

9 Infants Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave. (65 beds) 

10 Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The, 424 Dud- 

ley St., Roxbury (See also Somerville) 

11 Isaac Alberts Memorial Aid Association x 

12 Italian Legion Auxiliary, Boston Unit Number One . 

13 Jacoby Club of Boston, The, 168 Dartmouth St. 

14 Jamaica Plain Dispensary, 26 South St., Jamaica Plain 

15 Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association, 276 

Amory St., Jamaica Plain 

16 Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association .... 

17 Jewish Big Brother Association of Boston, 6 North Russell St. 

18 Jewish Children's Aid Society of Boston .... 

19 Jewish Child Welfare Association, 6 North Russell St. 

20 Jewish Ministers Cantors Association of New England 

21 Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of Massachusetts 

22 John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the Benefit and 

Support of Aged Poor Persons, and of Orphans and De- 
serted Children, Trustees of, 43 Hawkins St. 1 

23 John Howard Industrial Home, The .... 

24 John H. Storer Student Loan Fund, Incorporated 

25 Joseph Herman Trust Fund, Inc., The .... 

26 Judge Baker Guidance Center, 38^ Beacon St. . . 

27 Junior League of Boston, Inc., The, Zero Marlborough St. 

28 Keith Fund, Inc 

29 Kfar Debian Society, Inc 

30 Ladies Auxiliary to L, 6th, and Third Battalion, 372d In- 

fantry, Massachusetts National Guard, Inc. . 

31 Ladies Helping Hand Home for Jewish Children, 35 Chest- 

nut Hill Ave., Brighton 

32 Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts . 

33 Ladies' Unity Club, 18 Melville Ave., Dorchester 

34 Lawrence Avenue Free Loan Association, 47 Lawrence 

Ave., Roxbury . . . . 

35 League of Women for Community Service, 558 Massachu- 

36 Lend A Hand Society, 101 Tremont St. ! 

37 Lincoln House Association, 80 Emerald St. 

38 Little House, Inc., The, 73 A St., South Boston 

39 Lord's Day League of New England, 88 Tremont St. 

40 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of, 619 Wash- 

ington St. (See below) ...... 

41 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Agricultural Fund) . 

42 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Dumb Animal Fund) 

43 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Educational Fund) 

44 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Fund for Aiding Discharged Convicts) 

45 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Hospital Fund) ....... 

46 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Theatrical Fund) 

47 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Mary 

A. Crabtree Fund) 

48 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (World 

War Veterans Fund No. 1) 

49 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (World 

War Veterans Fund No. 2) 

50 Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten Alumnae Association, In- 

corporated, The, 100 Riverway 

51 Lutheran Board of Missions, Inc 

52 Lutheran Immigrant Board, Boston, Massachusetts, Inc., 

The, 9 Henry St., East Boston 

53 Marie Dewing Faelton Charitable Association, Inc., 30 

Huntington Ave 



00 CO ■— i o 
CO C<J 


$10 
151 


$420 


$16,764 
3,354 
10,666 


3 


6,188 


- 


- 


2,112,874 
197,143 
812,198 


10,502 

2,500 

24,010 


31 
1,113 


66,514 

8,436 

29,840 


128,360 


10,441 


- 


3,079 


1,096 
2,892 
55,288 


201 

4,697 

298 


487 


1,770 


29,269 
2,352 

1,156 

14 
44,207 


5,980 
1,701 
5,057 
1,488 
65,810 
80 
3,570 


597 
2,978 

504 

3,606 

120 


98 
42 

29 
730 


121,762 
5,435 
11,301 
358,631 
100,983 
338,953 


250 

40,960 
42,446 

3 


822 

2,050 
18,320 


7,210 

269 

34 

11,710 

11,221 


20 


105 


- 


- 


31,824 


7,537 


5,918 


- 


116,082 


1,773 


650 


3,246 


4,301 


144 


3,110 


- 


11,933 
132,648 


4,672 
3,031 


3,058 
991 


5,437 


448,655 

8,387 

107,412 


13,434 
6,380 
3,651 


1,521 
903 


22,867 
4,534 


522,226 


- 


2,482 


23,244 


304,095 


- 


- 


27,964 


25,404 


- 


- 


1,320 


100,512 


- 


- 


4,746 


51,214 


- 


- 


2,788 


100,465 


- 


- 


4,858 


100,402 


- 


- 


4,815 


2,243,738 


- 


20,762 


97,059 


21,346 


- 


- 


1,064 


387 
16,759 


1,701 
10,579 


662 
100 


106 


21,281 


3,585 


1,521 


16 


22,182 


55 


40 


922 


2 Report not due. 




3 Restricted to 


capital. 



None. 



1 No report. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



83 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service ok Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$50,314 



20,827 



250* 



2,694 
5,486 



$16,764 

3,354 

10,666 

572 



127,362 
12,050 
51,850 

34,348 



4,697 
2,068 

6,676 
4,721 
5,057 
2,021 
72,111 
200 
9,829 



$16,665 

2,893 

11,103 

507 

6,192 

71,790 
11,579 
61,015 

24,540 



3,746 
2,107 

6,102 
4,780 
5,057 
2,154 
72,063 
214 
2,391 



$8,656 
250 

25 

4,060 

43,988 
4,452 
2,780 



2,089 
1,350 

4,323 

4 S 410 

15,420 



2 
236 



238 



285 
3,387 

1,494 

138 

301 

41 

237 



2 
236 



147 147 

* 26 10 

775 12 



238 

285 
3,387 

500 

_4 

301 

-4 

2 
8 
3 



25 



2,000 


7,460 

1,092 

34 

56,720 

61,386 

11,221 

3 


6,539 
725 

50,828 

59,067 

57,355 

115 


2,400 

41,400 
12,952 
9,200 


- 


105 


88 


- 


- 


13,455 


13,054 


4,304 


- 


5,670 


5,716 


2,014 


- 


3,254 


3,256 


100 


1,050 n 

750 / 
250 


7,732 

10,210 

37,822 

7,642 

8,436 


7,329 

11,059 

37,883 

7,946 

17,009 


1,070 

3,994 
28,226 

5,507 
12,160 


- 


25,726 


13,263 


1,825 


- 


«7,964 


28,002 


1,984 


- 


1,320 


1,299 


107 


- 


4,746 


4,855 


391 


- 


2,788 


2,628 


216 


- 


4,858 


5,494 


388 


- 


4,815 


4,837 


396 


- 


117,821 


115,033 


13,290 


- 


1,064 


1,032 


62 



50 



2,364 
10,786 



5,122 
1,069 



2,091 
11,208 

3,938 

958 



694 



714 
37 



1,214 



166 
1,000 



43 



582 

472 
7 

3,7045 
19 



714 
37 



1,000 
8 



38 



38,926 27,817 



165 
100 



43 



33 

582 

472 

7 

1,274* 
19 



3,583 



23 
667 



61 



175 
3 



Not stated. 



5 Census. 



84 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 
and 

Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



39 



45 



Boston — Con. 

Martinist Home, The, 5 Mt. Pleasant Place, Roxbury 

Masonic Education and Charity Trust, 51 Boylston St. . 

Massachusetts Association for Occupational Therapy, Inc., 
554 Columbus Ave. 1 

Massachusetts Association for Promoting the Interests of 
the Adult Blind 

Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society, 88 Tremont St. 

Massachusetts Baptist Convention, 15 Ashburtoa Place . 

Massachusetts Branch of National Association on Indian 
Affairs, Inc 

Massachusetts Branch of the International Order of The 
King's Daughters and Sons, The, 14 Beacon St. . 

Massachusetts Branch of the Shut In Society Inc., The . 

Massachusetts Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary to the 
National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the United States of America, The, 1 Joy St. 

Massachusetts Catholic Woman's Guild .... 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society, The 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Summer Street 
Fire Fund) 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, 111 Hunt- 
ington Ave 

Massachusetts Charitable Society, The .... 

Massachusetts Child Council, Incorporated, 41 Mt. Ver- 
non St 

Massachusetts Civic League, 3 Joy St 

Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Soeiety, The 

Massachusetts Congregational Conference and Missionary 
Society, 14 Beacon St 

Massachusetts Department of the Ladies of the Grand 
Army of the Republic . . . . 

Massachusetts Division of the International Sunshine So- 
ciety, The 

Massachusetts Elks Scholarship, Inc 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles St. 
(184 beds) 

Massachusetts General Hospital, The, Fruit St., Boston 
(Includes McLean Hospital, Belmont (961 beds) . 

Massachusetts Girl Scouts, Incorporated, 87 Beacon St. x . 

Massachusetts Home, 65 Deaconess Rd. 

Massachusetts Housing Association Incorporated, 89 

Shawmut Ave 

Massachusetts League of Girls' Cluba, Incorporated, 264 

Boylston St 

Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital (not in operation) . 
Massachusetts Maternity and Foundling Hospital Corpora- 
tion (not in operation) * 

Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society 
Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals, 750 Harrison Ave. 

(311 beds) . 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, Inc., 43 Evergreen 

St., Jamaica Plain (31 beds) 

Massachusetts Prison Association, 1101 Barristers Hall . 
Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund Association 

Incorporated . . 

Massachusetts Rural Communities, Inc., 49 Federal St. . 
Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged Prisoners, 

40 Pemberton Square 

Massachusetts Society for Social Hygiene, Incorporated, 

80 Boylston St 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 

Animals, 180 Longwood Ave 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 

Children, 43 Mt. Vernon St 

Massachusetts Society for the University Education of 

Women 

Massachusetts State Firemens Association 

Massachusetts Teachers' Federation, 15 Ashburton Place . 

Massachusetts Tents Building Christian and Charitable 

Association for Women Under the Jurisdiction of the 

Eastern District No. 3, The, 560 Columbus Ave. 1 
Massachusetts Trustees of the International Committee of 

Young Men's Christian Associations for Army and Navy 

Work (Incorporated), The, 7 City Sq., Charlestown 
Massachusetts Tuberculosis League Inc., 80 Boylston St. . 
Massachusetts Veterans Association, Inc. * 



$1,103 
1,927,875 


- 


$1,324 


$2,870 
82,379 


229,443 

285,443 

1,235,668 


$4,998 

4,157 

36,013 


2,945 


9,396 
13,018 
48,870 


134 


678 


- 


- 


46,359 
5,874 


4,565 
874 


7,286 
469 


80 
162 


39,088 

2,805 

59,776 


1,014 
4,023 


121 
980 
27 


1,682 

47 

2,389 


63,409 


- 


- 


2,426 


1,045,246 
222,172 


404 


- 


95,675 
10,040 


834 

398 

283,592 


10,894 

10,342 

175 


30 
298 


15,774 


1,864,026 


64,324 


- 


82,706 


- 


459 


292 


4 


17 
18,970 


- 


- 


715 


2,351,008 


36,616 


333,465 


72,673 


22,143,241 


180,621 


2,064,658 


477,219 


92,232 


5,951 


23,556 


1,425 


817,456 


- 


110 


22,635 


19,720 


785 


8,027 


36 


70,967 


206 


105 


2,838 


5,258,473 


53,331 


294,017 


253,862 


140,158 
11,617 


502 


68,454 


841 


309 


338 


- 


- 


126,966 


612 


- 


5,944 


17,440 


13,465 


457 


189 


3,826,790 


11,146 


121,712 


135,070 


1,737,897 


115,175 


4,777 


60,139 


50,427 

265 

38,642 


398 

8,788 

11,975 


315 
12,290 


2,413 
348 



608,787 
24,758 



12,251 
28,349 



23,608 
500 



1,186 
1,661 



- None. 



1 No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



85 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service ob Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indl- 

divuals 

Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$21,912 2 


$4,195 
82,823 


$3,014 
71,814 


$1,008 
2,120 


1,0002 

2222 
4,924 2 


17,340 
16,175 
84,884 


16,755 
14,987 
91,597 


3,595 

700 

10,160 


- 


678 


582 


- 


500 2 


11,932 
1,506 


14,252 
1,361 


2,097 
480 


483 


3,367 
5,051 
2,416 


2,969 
5,002 
2,886 


275 


- 


2,426 


1,046 


50 


- 


96,071 
10,040 


99,738 
5,524 


36,798 
400 


~ 


10,924 
10,641 
15,949 


10,257 
10,338 
16,609 


8,232 

7,114 

300 


7,153 


154,184 


153,928 


15,267 


- 


755 


978 


86 


- 


715 


11 
2,046 


- 


44,807 2 


432,756 


427,499 


235,642 


316,946 2 \ 
9,065 / 


2,721,828 


2,761,045 


1,592,148 


- 


30,933 


23,522 


5,743 


- 


22,746 


25,521 


12,099 


- 


8,848 


10,406 


3,100 


2,000 


8,049 


8,467 


- 


50,540 2 


601,212 


533,294 


_3 


- 


68,455 
1,344 


77,815 
4,344 


30,974 
3,075 


- 


338 


340 


- 


- 


6,556 


4,924 


2,530 


199,665 2 \ 

123,928 [ 

3,06 7 2 \ 

280,698 / 


14,111 
392,583 
460,790 


14,098 
268,799 
216,397 


6,740 
61,279 
162,726 


100 


3,126 
8,788 
24,714 


2,686 
8,902 
22,645 


37 
2,680 
8,529 



30 



5 

105 



51 

_3 

1,000 
301 



21 



1,755 



5 

105 



1,000 
36 



4 
3 


58 


58 


17 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


~ 


_3 

18 


18 


205 


7,149 


808 


1,530 


53,382 


1,565 


13 


85 


20 


3 


625 


117 


9 


535 


5 


- 


22 


22 


266 


20,930 


6,600 


36 

1 


10,430 
299 


1,462 
299 



1,755 



68 


680,753* 


652,195* 


94 


17,054 


17,054 


1 
1 
2 


17 

279 

2 


17 

_3 

2 



22 



120 



230 



37,046 
30,510 



45,524 
32,461 



26,229 
15,297 



21 168,060 5 
6 



J Not stated. 



Animals. 



6 Attendance. 



86 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



40 



Boston— Con. 

Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temperance Union 
Inc., 302 Marlborough St. . 

Massachusetts Woman's Home Misssionary Union, 14 Bea- 
con St 

Massachusetts Women's Hospital, The, 53 Parker Hill 
Ave., Roxbury (62 beds) 

Master Fishermen's Charitable Association 

Maverick Dispensary of East Boston, 18 Chelsea St. 2 

Merrimac Mission, Incorporated, The, 107 Staniford St. . 

Merwin Memorial Free Clinic for Animals, Inc., 113 North- 
ampton St. 

Michael Anagnos Schools ...... 

Morgan Memorial Co-operative Industries and Stores, Inc., 
The, 89 Shawmut Ave. . . 

Mount Pleasant Home, The, 301 South Huntington Ave. . 

National Association of Goodwill Industries, Inc., 89 Shaw- 
mut Ave. . . . . . . . 

National Braille Press Inc., 549 East Fourth St., South 
Boston 

Needle Woman's Friend Society, 229 Berkeley St. . 

New England Anti- Vivisection Society, The, 6 Park St. . 

New England Baptist Hospital, 91 Parker Hill Ave., Rox- 
bury (150 beds) 

New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 581 Boyl- 
ston St 

New England Deaeoness Association, 141 Milk St. (See also 
Attleboro, Concord and Natick) 

New England Deaconess Hospital, 16 Deaconess Rd. (278 
beds) 

New England Farm and Garden Association Inc., 39 New- 
bury St 

New England Grenfell Association, 25 Huntington Ave. . 

New England Heart Association 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, 161 South Hunt- 
ington Ave ... 

New England Hospital for Women and Children, Dimock 
St., Roxbury (154 beds) 

New England Kurn Hattin Homes, Westminster, Vermont 

New England Salvage Stores for Palestine, Inc., 1423 Wash- 
ington St 

New England Watch and Ward Society, The, 41 Mt. Ver 
non St 

Newsboys Reading Room Association of Boston, The 

Nickerson Home for Children, 125 Townsend St., Roxbury 

Norfolk House Centre, 14 John Eliot Square, Roxbury 

North Bennet Street Industrial School, The, 39 North Ben 
net St 

North End Diet Kitchen, The . 

North End Dispensary, 517 Shawmut Ave. . . # # , 

Norwegian Old Peoples Home and Charitable Association 
of Greater Boston, 20 Cushing Ave., Dorchester . 

Nursery Training School of Boston, The, 147 Ruggles St 

Nutrition Clinics, Incorporated, 290 Commonwealth Ave 

Oliver Ditson Society for the Relief of Needy Musicians 

Order of Sir Galahad, In«., The, 1 Joy St. 

Order of the Fleur de Lis, Inc., 1 Joy St. . 

Overseers of the Public Welfare in the City of Boston, The : 
43 Hawkins St. 1 

Pan- Albanian Federation of America "Vatra" (The Hearth) 
Inc., The 

Particular Council Society St. Vincent de Paul of the City 
of Boston, The, 41 Hawkins St. 1 

Penny Wise Thrift Shop, Inc., The, 235 Huntington Ave 

Permanent Charity Fund Incorporated, Committee of the, 
100 Franklin St 

Permanent Peace Fund, Trustees of the . 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 721 Huntington Ave. (246 
beds) 

Phineas G. Parmenter Foundation, Inc. . . _ . 

Plymouth Hospital Corporation of Boston (not in opera- 
tion) 

Polish Home of The Little Flower, Inc., Hale St., Hydi 
Park 

Preachers' Aid Society of the New England Annual Con 
ference of the Methodist Episcopal Church . 

Reconstruction Clinic and Hospital, 452 Beacon St. 8 



$61,848 


$5,504 


$2,222 


$4,010 


222,596 


- 


- 


10,408 


49,024 
11,960 


1,530 
11,351 


62,815 


8,250 
195 


73 


3,010 


- 


- 


60,712 
232,041 


1,150 


394 


2,659 
8,590 


1,242,108 
323,136 


127,943 
6,034 


477,859 
5,848 


12,367 
5,505 


157 


418 


- 


- 


15,099 
56,080 
96,920 


12,973 
2,420 
1,218 


2,662 
32 


174 
2,700 
4,653 


1,388,768 


11,720 


270,618 


8,070 


51,774 


46,711 


- 


- 


253,078 


1,739 


9,104 


1,212 


2,559,154 


126,099 


526,788 


13,487 


40,066 

515,466 

597 


3,791 

20,930 

459 


28,598 
14 


1,065 
21,466 


1,786,791 


35,384 


19,468 


73,651 


1,609,893 
244 


50,760 
1,206 


172,232 


31,364 


532 


- 


8,151 


- 


211,283 
31,668 
33,327 
189,341 


2,860 

3 

1,050 

21,785 


1,585 
4,355 


9,501 

2,618 

868 

2,100 


165,787 
44,976 
23,934 


39,300 
3,664 


8,572 


4,325 
2,030 


75,955 

26,761 

267 

34,341 

325 

199 


849 
8,359 
2,509 

1,497 


880 

11,824 

1,198 

712 
82 


1,668 
232 

920 



4,007 

4,948,719 
133,281 

6,498,495 
3,079 

4,004 

75,157 

984,503 
12.000 



1,413 

1,105 

84,427 

3,340 
1,059 



10,062 

294,700 

3,658 
1,508 



77 

214,558 
6,192 

108,893 



34,603 



None 



1 No report. 



2 Report not due. 



3 Attendance. 



* Animals. 



5 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



87 



Continued. 













Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 




$1,502 


$13,239 


$12,983 


$4,161 


2 


2 










1 


50,556 


60,965 


12,387 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


2 


- 


72,378 
11,547 


81,181 
9,363 


37,789 
2,720 


1 


71 


1,045 
114 


67 

114 


19 


- 


3 
4 
5 
6 


- 


3,010 


2,971 


946 


- 


1 


47,4703 


47,470 3 


- 


- 


/ 6,050 « 
\ 17,174 
2,618 


4,203 
8,590 

J 616,344 
19,650 


3,789 
10,081 

584,000 
26,611 


2,392 

100,589 
9,403 


3 


2 

97 
15 


9,419* 
49 

13,105 
38 


8,426 * 

_5 

7,107 


1,519 


- 


7 

8 

9 
10 


- 


418 


261 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


22,719 
/ 12,451 « 
\ 561 


13,087 

7,782 

28,624 

J 281,971 


12,376 
8,464 
8,684 

257,449 


4,960 
2,882 
3,243 

88,250 


2 


17 
2 
2 

153 


5,600 
60 

4,765 


5,600 
60 

158 


- 


1 


12 
13 
14 

15 


7,210 


53,921 


59,217 


450 


- 


1 


_5 


_5 


- 


- 


16 


4,000 
/ 64,848 « 
I 14,391 


16,056 
\ 
1 666,105 


19,804 
627,910 


4,965 
318,174 


- 


4 
313 


8,174 


723 


_ 


- 


17 

18 


5,503 « 

/ 2,033 « 
\ 19,999 


33,470 

34,832 

473 

} 148,503 


32,574 

24,926 

730 

148,224 


5,506 

5,144 

186 

76,995 


1 


5 

_! 

1 

55 


10 
963 


10 
643 


- 


1 
4 


19 

20 
21 

22 


21,735 < 


246,431 
1,206 


254,956 
1,500 


134,643 


1 


147 


15,556 


3,186 


- 


1 


23 
24 


- 


8,151 


8,269 


3,605 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


2 


25 


364 
700 


12,725 
2,621 
4,204 

28,240 


11,802 
1,760 
3,511 

25,608 


8,491 

260 

1,363 

12,930 


1 


5 

4 
36 


43 
2,100' 


12 

_5 




7 

1 


26 

27 
28 
29 


- 


52,198 
5,695 


54,455 
7,059 


38,423 


- 


68 


5,010 

_5 


4,440 

_5 




3 
1 


30 
31 
32 


- 


3,398 
20,416 
3,707 
920 
2,477 
82 


6,428 
19,688 
3,449 
873 
2,813 
74 


825 
10,971 
2,000 

1,298 


3 


2 
11 

1 

2 


25 

75 

15 

_5 


15 
15 

_5 


66 
59 


2 


33 

34 
35 
36 

37 
38 

39 


- 


1,718 


1,737 


1,056 


1 


- 


" 


" 


- 


- 


40 

41 


- 


10,139 


10,538 


1,976 


- 


2 


" 


~ 


- 


3 


42 


- 


215,663 
6,192 


208,660 
6,692 


9,600 
750 


1 


2 
2 


- 


- 


- 


119 
1 


43 
44 


: 


485,148 
108 


555,558 
5 


277,614 


1 


317 


11,944 


1,328 


- 


- 


45 
46 

47 

48 

4!) 
5!) 


( 12 
I 792 


7,203 

J 36,455 
3,151 


5,220 

43,136 
5,051 


3,420 
1,629 


- 


2 
3 


78 

119 
3,098 


41 

119 

291 


_ 


- 



6 Restricted to capital. 



7 Membership. 



Name changed to Boston Evening Clinic and Hospital. 



88 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 
and 

Refunds 



Interest. 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Boston — Con. 
Resthaven Corporation, 120 Fisher Ave., Roxbury 
Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables, 125 Parker 

Hill Ave., Roxbury (115 beds) . 
Robert Gould Shaw House, Inc., 11 Windsor St., Roxbury 
Robert Treat Paine Association, The 

Rotch Travelling Scholarship, Inc 

Roxbiry Charitable Society, The 4 . 

Roxbury Home for Aged Women, 5 Burton Ave., Roxbury 

Roxbury Ladies Aid and Fuel Society, The, 532 Warren St., 

Roxbury . . • 

Roxbury Ladies' Club l . . . . 

Roxbury Neighborhood House Association, 858 Albany 
Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc. 
Rufus F. Dawes Hotel Association, 8 Pine St. . 
Rutland Corner House, 453 Shawmut Ave. 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses Alumnae Association, 
Incorporated . . . . . . . 

Saint Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston, 736 Cambridge 

Brighton (250 beds) 

Saint Joseph's Home, 321 Centre St., Dorchester 
St. Luke's Home for Convalescents, 149 Roxbury St., Rox- 
bury 

Saint Mary's Infant Asylum and Lying-in-Hospital, 90 

Cushing Ave., Dorchester (64 beds) 
Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, The, 

East Brookline St 

Sanders Fund, Inc. 

Scandinavian Sailors' Home, Inc., Ill Webster St., East 

Boston 

Scientific Temperance Federation, The, 400 Boylston St. 
Scollay Square Service Club (Incorporated) 
Scots Charitable Society, The, 7 Water St. 
Sears and other Funds, Trustees of the . 
Settlements Museum Association, 36 Rutland St. 
Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children . 

Simmons Club of Boston 

Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, Inc. 

Sisters of Lord Beaconsfield Aid Society, Inc. . 

Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored 

People in Massachusetts, Inc., The, 60 Vernon St. . 
Society for Ministerial Relief, 25 Beacon St. . 
Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled Episcopal Clergy- 
men 

Society for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans of Clergy- 
men of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1 Joy St. 
Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home), 125 High- 
land St., Roxbury (20 beds) .... 
Sofia American Schools, Inc ..... 
Solomon M. Hyams Fund, Inc., 49 Federal St. 
South Boston Neighborhood House, 521 East Seventh 
South Boston Samaritan Society .... 
South End Day Nursery, The, 25 Dover St. . 
South End Day Nursery Auxiliary . 
South End Diet Kitchen of Boston, The, 25 Bennet St. 
South End House Association, The, 20 Union Park St. 
South End Music School, The, 32 Rutland St. . 
Speech Readers Guild of Boston, The, 339 Commonwealth 

Ave. 

Stearas Fund, Inc. 

Students' Aid Foundation, Incorporated, The . 
Students House Corporation, 96 The Fenway . 
Sunnyside Day Nursery, The, 16 Hancock St. . 
Swedish Home of Peace ("Fridhem"), 169 Townsend St., 

Roxbury 

Swiss Benevolent Society 

Syrian Child Welfare Society, Inc., The . 

Syrian Ladies' Aid Society, The, 44 West Newton St. 

Taadood Melkite Catholic Society of Greater Boston, Inc., 

The, 178 Harrison Ave 

Tabernacle Society of Boston, The . ... 

Talitha Cumi Home, The, 215 Forest Hills St., Jamaica 

Plains 

Three-fold Movement — League of Neighbors, Fellowship 
of Faiths, Union of East and West (Incorporated), The 1 
Thrift Shop of Boston, Inc., The, 90 Huntington Ave. 
Travelers Aid Society of Boston, Inc., 481 South Station . 



$52,594 



$5,706 



$3,374 



$193 



,852,749 


31,976 


56,372 


45,976 


218,517 


8,998 


2,117 


5,490 


115,237 


- 


- 


11,933 


79,808 


- 


- 


3,990 


407,845 


3,806 


500 


17,239 


82 


8,102 


2,547 


- 


107,291 


12,554 


1,109 


2,750 


41,005 


- 


- 


810 


113,974 


- 


9,900 


- 


109,575 


2,200 


307 


3,942 


4,196 


701 


248 


114 


1,023,669 


62,507 


307,221 


1,000 


67,481 


168 


13,400 


- 


400,821 


6,829 


1,893 


13,836 


249,503 


4,398 


86,761 


2,274 


2,891,960 


463,312 


284,935 


_ 


215 


15,731 


132 


- 


15,166 


2,864 


2,429 


- 


11,928 


2,843 


1,193 


321 


10,947 


1,436 


88 


335 


82,692 


213 


94 


4,146 


291,162 


— 


- 


9,298 


3,087 


527 


85 


325 


621,892 


- 


- 


25,775 


85 


306 


108 


- 


339 


636 


836 


— 


268 


- 


224 


- 


81,221 


33,436 


1,630 


_ 


390,832 


2,373 


- 


17,456 


233,219 


- 


- 


8,830 


237,451 


12,798 


- 


- 


67,435 


5,241 


2,305 


2,287 


723,247 


1,294 


165,033 


26,070 


1,558,352 


- 


— 


86,401 


20,288 


5,566 


406 


- 


1,000 


10 


- 


35 


68,432 


4,990 


405 


2,350 


9,196 


435 


4,060 


308 


50,313 


4,335 


- 


3,458 


389,345 


27,351 


9,682 


7,808 


49,643 


3,606 


9,803 


16 


47,516 


7,774 


3,119 


429 


3,073 


8,505 


2,682 


- 


30,215 


- 


3,867 


1,494 


113,813 


132 


22,822 


- 


46,615 


5,484 


453 


638 


12,013 


704 


3,432 


- 


3,011 


146 


— 


86 


486 


241 


153 


10 


18,220 


458 


2,429 


- 


216 


16 


66 


_ 


844 


1,328 


1,010 


- 


304,254 


11,609 


4,009 


6,893 


4,128 


_ 


14,124 


_ 


33,189 


19,882 


2,451 


1,140 


3 Not stated. 


4 Report not due. 


6 Membership. 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



89 



Continued. 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Service or Relief Given 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 
zations 






tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 


viduals 
Free 


sive of 
Indi- 




















viduals 






$50 


$9,415 


$8,639 


$3,669 




6 


67 


14 


_ 


_ 


1 


1,043 > 


134,648 


142,294 


81,811 


1 


114 


884 


486 


_ 


_ 


2 


8,050 2 


16,630 


16,308 


8,989 


- 


9 


1,500 


800 


750 


5 


3 


- 


11,933 


10,986 


660 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


43 


4 


- 


3,990 


4,309 


449 


_3 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


5 
6 

7 


- 


21,096 


19,081 


7,007 


1 


9 


24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10,650 


11,618 


1,341 


- 


2 


- 


- 


108 


7 


8 
9 
10 


_ 


16,413 


18,417 


12,834 


_ 


22 


2,050* 


1,000 s 


_ 


_ 


- 


810 


661 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


28 


11 


- 


9,900 


10,602 


6,815 


- 


12 


213,139 s 


_3 


- 


- 


12 


- 


6,449 


5,689 


2,990 


- 


4 


520 


347 


- 


38 


13 


- 


1,064 


370 


50 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


14 


- 


370,729 


359,242 


154,950 


_ 


212 


17,420 


3,664 


_ 


_ 


15 


- 


13,568 


13,545 


3,360 


~ 


10 


46 


- 


- 


- 


16 


196> 


22,559 


22,355 


10,671 


~ 


12 


374 


60 


- 


- 


17 


8,323 


101,758 


110,811 


49,980 


- 


68 


1,293 


11 


- 


- 


18 


32,3002 


697,551 


719,220 


265,943 


3 


379 


212,001 


86,554 


23,753 


44 


19 


- 


15,864 


15,732 


1,050 


3 


1 


133 


133 


10 


10 


20 


_ 


5,293 


8,286 


3,010 


_ 


4 


418 


59 


_ 


_ 


21 


2,047 


6,405 


7,142 


5,035 


3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


- 


1,860 


1,702 


932 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


23 


- 


4,454 


5,178 


300 


- 


1 


59 


59 


88 


- 


24 


- 


9,298 


9,306 


500 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


25 


- 


937 


2,541 


2,120 


- 


3 


_3 


_3 


- 


- 


26 


— 


25,775 


26,206 


3,929 


- 


1 


250 


250 


- 


- 


27 


- 


414 


358 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


28 


- 


1,473 


1,861 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


29 


- 


224 


284 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


- 


30 


1,127 


10,637 


12,523 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,250 


1,250 


400 


_ 


31 


- 


18,529 


19,993 


200 


2 


- 


59 


59 


- 


- 


32 


3,781 2 


8,830 


9,860 


- 


- 


- 


19 


19 


- 


- 


33 


- 


12,798 


16,069 


- 


- 


- 


46 


46 


- 


- 


34 


_ 


9,833 


9,949 


3,969 


_ 


7 


58 


43 


_ 


_ 


35 


— 


192,914 


180,603 


69,081 


- 


70 


500 


— 


- 


- 


36 


- 


86,401 


92,992 


28,255 


2 


30 


1,700 


1,700 


- 


13 


37 


- 


5,973 


6,186 


4,980 


- 


5 


527 


91 


62 


- 


38 


— 


45 


45 


— 


- 


- 


86 


86 


17 


- 


39 


- 


7,746 


6,826 


3,988 


- 


5 


68 


11 


61 


- 


40 


— 


4,804 


5,873 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


- 


1 


41 


- 


7,793 


7,916 


- 


- 


- 


1,515 


1,515 


- 


1 


42 


175 


42,116 


42,141 


25,641 


- 


30 


3,000 


_3 


- 


- 


43 


— 


13,427 


12,275 


9,487 


— 


30 


354 


45 


— 


- 


44 


/ 1,8002 
\ 800 


} 11,973 




















11,008 


6,258 


- 


8 


1,033 


709 


- 


106 


45 


- 


11,187 


8,401 


- 


— 


— 


59 


59 


13 


17 


46 


- 


5,361 


2,198 


- 


- 


- 


15 


- 


- 


— 


47 


- 


22,954 


28,748 


9,130 


- 


11 


50 


- 


- 


7 


48 


- 


6,576 


7,686 


4,749 


- 


6 


50 


7 


26 


- 


49 


_ 


4,137 


4,150 


1,311 


_ 


2 


79 


4 


_ 


_ 


50 


— 


232 


137 


- 


- 


— 


6 


6 


— 


- 


51 


- 


406 


280 


- 


_ 


_ 


40 


40 


- 


2 


52 


- 


2,887 


2,691 


450 


- 


1 


16 


16 


- 


- 


53 


„ 


82 


42 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


54 


- 


2,339 


2,540 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


_s 


- 


- 


55 


364 2 


22,312 


23,306 


10,607 


- 


19 


284 


240 


- 




56 


/ 1,0002 
\ 500 


14,124 
J 23,974 


11,068 


3,013 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


7 


57 
58 


20,648 


14,633 


- 


9 


13,403 


13,403 


61 




59 



8 Census. 



7 Name changed to Olivia James House. 



8 Report for 10 months. 



90 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Boston— Con. 

1 Trinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel Allen Memo- 

rial), 135 South Huntington Ave. .... 

2 Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery, 406 Meri- 

dian St., East Boston 

3 Union Rescue Mission, The, 1 Dover St 

4 Unitarian Foundation, Inc., 25 Beacon St. l 

5 Unitarian Service Pension Society, The, 25 Beacon St. 

6 Vernon Advent Christian Home Inc., South Vernon, Ver- 

mont ( 

7 Veterans' Charitable Legal Association, Inc., 619 Washing- 

ton St 

8 Village Club, Inc., The, 26 Tavern Rd., Roxbury . 

9 Vincent Memorial Hospital, The, 125 South Huntington 

Ave. (22 beds) 

10 Volunteers of America, Inc. of Massachusetts, 25 Hanover 

St." 

11 Washingtonian Home, 41 Waltham St. . . . . 

12 Wells Memorial Association, 985 Washington St. 

13 West End House Alumni Association, Inc., 16 Blossom St. . 

14 West End House, Inc., The, 16 Blossom St. # . 

15 West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Association, The 

16 West End Young Mens Hebrew Association, 47 Mt. Vernon 

St 

17 Westminster Foundation, Inc. x 

18 Widows' Society in Boston 

19 William Lawrence Camp, Inc. . . 

20 Winchester Home for Aged Women .... 

21 Wolfeboro Charitable Fund Inc. 1 

22 Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society 

23 Womans Auxiliary of the New England Baptist Hospital . 

24 Woman's Board of Missions, 14 Beacon St. . 

25 Woman's Charity Club, The, 53 Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury 

26 Woman's Home Missionary Society of the New England 

Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church (Cooper 
Community Centre), 36 Williams St., Roxbury 

27 Woman's Home Missionary Society of the New England 

Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church (Medical 
Mission), 36 Hull St 

28 Woman's Seaman's Friend Society 

29 Woman's Universalist Missionary Society of Massachu- 

setts, The, 16 Beacon St 

30 Women's Educational and Industrial Union, 264 Boylston 

St 

3 1 Women's Edueational and Industrial Union, Trustees of the 

32 Women's Municipal League Committees, Incorporated, 3 

Joy St 

33 Women's Palestine Agricultural Association Inc. (The Pala- 

grass) . . . . 

34 Women's Scholarship Association 

35 Women's Service Club of Boston, 464 Massachusetts Ave. 

36 Wood Memorial Home, Inc 

37 Working Girls Home, The, 89 Union Park St. . 

38 Young Men's Educational Aid Association, The * 

39 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston, 108 Seaver St., 

Roxbury 

40 Young Traveller's Aid Society, The .... 

41 Young Viggianese Club of East Boston . 

B OXFORD 

42 Female Charitable Society of West Boxford 

Braintree 

43 Braintree Friendly Aid Association 7 . 

44 Braintree Young Men's Christian Association . 

45 Norfolk County Health Association, Inc. 



$184,078 



$3,347 



24,274 
81,836 


9,197 
9,533 


598,200 


8,741 


28,953 


746 


172 


174 
377 


611,658 


20,244 


133,208 

62,774 

1,535 

583,978 

109 


2,400 

9,815 

990 

301 

1,252 


43,094 


- 


321,318 
26,402 


4,716 
1,096 


39,078 

355 

488,302 


1,977 
1,089 
6,036 


373,420 


2,880 


70,340 


4,405 


71,411 
14,807 


10,460 
1,120 


53,643 


5,009 


100,000 
761,459 


46,671 


70 


6,722 


559 

616 

10,959 

,459,327 

303,508 


150 

846 
494 


148,951 
27,456 


13,850 
35 



87 



16 



532 


2,091 


1,476 


- 


2,067 


16,047 



$6,276 
1.027 



1,250 

1,977 
278 



15,485 

7,823 

130 

4,915 



1,679 

62 
6,689 



219 
91 



1,787 



298 



,903 



687,348 



874 

3,112 
1,410 
1,516 

63,423 



12,951 



197 



2,158 



$5,801 

240 

194 



817 

25,799 

3,515 
40 

14,555 

14,923 

1,485 
15,571 

1,810 

586 
2,614 

526 

10 

98,459 
916 

1,064 



46 

47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 


Bridgewater 
Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association .... 

Brockton 
Brockton Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 86 Main St. 

Brockton Day Nursery, 39 Everett St 

Brockton Girl Scouts, Inc., 152 Main St. ... 
Brockton Hospital Company, §80 Centre St. (121 beds) . 
Brockton Humane Society, The, 226 Pearl St. . 
Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational Association, 
Inc 


12,961 

8,697 

21,940 

6,178 

955,956 

9,498 

287 


353 

4,253 

1,453 

1,384 

28,013 

168 

300 


1,499 

3,635 

762 

5,498 

201,335 

147 

415 


327 

1,221 

14 

16,629 

1,126 

3 




None. 1 No report. 2 Restricted to 


capital. 


3 Not stated. 


4 


Report not due. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



91 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 





Average 


Number 


Number 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Officers 


Em- 




ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$13,325 



$15,660 



$7,199 



$1,500 


10,465 
11,228 


9,528 
10,479 


6,840 
5,825 


3,235 


11,976 


8,741 


100 


4,890 J 


2,822 


4,140 


1,535 


- 


2,152 
656 


2,152 
597 


1,071 


1,558 2 


36,546 


40,271 


20,952 


- 


21,400 
17,679 

1,120 
19,772 

1,252 


21,499 

16,382 

882 

19,835 

1,192 


8,519 
9,749 

10,293 
199 


- 


1,679 


1,606 


387 


" 


19,701 
7,785 


,17,601 
8,433 


1,100 
1,803 


1,742 »\ 
3,360 J 


3,657 
1,180 

23,968 
4,674 


2,002 
1,015 

23,943 
4,855 


249 



12 

7 


1,194 
29,302 


1,072 
29,302 


2 


79 


79 


3 


24 


5 


1 


1,317 
2,312 


1,250 


21 


345 


160 


10 
22 


765 
1,460 


6 


18 
1 


1,100 


300 


1 


2005 




1 
15 


90 
141 


90 
9 



22 



22 



2,361 



366 



2,339 



8,855 



4,800 



3,176 



601 



285 



263 



511 


17,364 
2,240 


16,965 
2,164 


10,860 
1,395 


2,000 s 


7,623 


7,356 


- 


- 


734.435 
526 


756,920 
569 


233,962 


- 


7,596 


7,478 


2,517 


- 


3,262 
2,266 
2,011 
98,459 
64,340 


2,702 
1,909 
2,984 
4,541 
64,196 


396 
17,802 


- 


26,801 

1,064 

35 


19,709 

1,100 

35 


2,340 



11 

1 


24,6726 




350 


_3 


- 


4 


728 


728 


2 
30 


420 
1,312 


345 
223 



2,0645 



3,360 



213 



271 



4,290 

61 

16,047 



4,814 
16,872 



3,133 
3,320 



1,383 
105 



725 
105 



3,0002 



2,180 



8,518 
3,437 
6,897 
245,978 
1,442 

719 



2,257 



8,403 
3,527 
6,328 
231,662 
1,619 



740 



1,733 



3,181 
1,688 
1,169 
91,976 
1,260 



143 
1 



266 



1,384* 

250 

530* 

8,320 

2.6808 



149 



1,123 
5 



146 



Membership. 



6 Visits. 



7 Name changed to Braintree Visiting Nurse Association. 



8 Animals. 



92 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Brockton— Con. 

1 Brockton Social Service Council, Inc., 196 Main St. . 

2 Brockton Visiting Nurse Association, 231 Main St. . 

3 Brockton Young Men's Christian Association, The, 320 

Main St 

4 Brockton Young Women's Christian Association, 465 Main 

St. . . 

5 Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery, Trustees of the, 

39 Everett St. . .... 

6 Family Welfare Association of Brockton, 19 L St. . 

7 Home for Aged Men in the City of Brockton, Trustees of 

the, 892 Belmont St 

8 Joubeilite Great League Incorporated .... 

9 Pettee-Chace Scholarship Fund 

10 Pilgrim Foundation, The, 1106 Main St 

11 Plymouth County Health Association, Inc., 106 Main St. . 

12 Wales Home for Aged Women, The, 553 North Main St. . 

13 Woman's Club of Brockton 

Brookline 

14 Arleen Grandberg Memorial * 

15 Brookline Council of Girl Scouts, Inc 

16 Brookline Friendly Society, The . . . . 

17 Brooks Hospital (42 beds) . . . 

18 Christian Science Benevolent Association, The (146 beds) . 

19 Frauen Verein 5 

20 Free Hospital for Women (97 beds) .... 

21 Jewish Women's Convalescent Home Association * . 

Cambridge 

22 Ames Foundation 

23 Avon Home, The, 1000 Massachusetts Ave. 

24 Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed Charitable 

Loan Association, 178 Elm St 

25 Cambridge Community Center, Inc., 49 Howard St. 

26 Cambridge Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc., 18 Brattle 

St.* 

27 Cambridge Girl Scouts Inc., 1234 Massachusetts Ave. 1 

28 Cambridge Hebrew Women's Aid Society, The 

29 Cambridge Homes for Aged People, 360 Mt. Auburn St. . 

30 Cambridge Hospital, 330 Mt. Auburn St. (185 beds) 

31 Cambridge Neighborhood House, 79 Moore St. 

32 Cambridge-port Fruit and Flower Mission, The 

33 Cambridge Rotary Educational Fund Inc. 

34 Cambridge Tuberculosis and Health Association, 689 Mas- 

sachusetts Ave 

35 Cambridge Visiting Nursing Association, The, 35 Bigelow 

St 

36 Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association, 820 Massa- 

chusetts Ave 

37 Cambridge Young Women's Christian Association, The, 7 

Temple St 

38 Council for the Clinical Training of Theological Students, 

Inc 

39 East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 105 Spring 

St 

40 Family Welfare Society of Cambridge, The, 763 Massa- 

chusetts Ave 

41 Harvard Legal Aid Bureau 

42 Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables, The, 1575 Cambridge 

St. (215 beds) 

43 Howard Benevolent Society of Cambridge, 763 Massachu- 

44 Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc., 67 Fourth St. (24 

beds) 

45 St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum, 45 Guyette Rd. . 

46 Tide Over League, Inc., 1400 Massachusetts Ave. . 

47 United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies of God, Inc., 

59 Moore St 

48 Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The 7 

Canton 

49 Canton Hospital and Nursing Association 

50 Canton Playgrounds Association, The .... 

- None. * No report. 



$20,387 
39,892 


$95,945 
11,795 


$13,154 


$1,442 


439,704 


13,324 


31,661 


16.672 


178,746 


11,514 


8,138 


2,013 


20,540 
3,666 


5,588 


703 


438 
80 


228,500 


- 


2,487 


4,392 


4,587 

1,003,229 

950 

243,453 

25,928 


29 

9,802 

506 

5,227 


4,589 

483 

1,478 


153 
41.691 

7,484 
836 


197 
127,542 


1,263 
13,813 


936 
7,008 


5,185 


249,102 
1,539,576 


6,000 
115,563 


95.355 
189,505 


301 

7,889 


3,079,169 


47,676 


56,821 


100,233 


14,086 
360,237 


2,481 


12 
3.252 


463 
15,793 


5,785 
2 


772 
5,057 


12,545 
177 


- 


902 
690,360 


1,639 
1,937 


1,894 
5,442 


29 
22,334 


2,051.164 


6,595 


220,306 


35,446 


40.175 

1,393 

175 


3,370 
208 


1.457 
7 


1,332 
48 
4 


15,345 


11,222 


641 


562 


67,402 


10,004 


9,984 


2,357 


428.032 


15,802 


67,589 


6,458 


255.950 


23,109 


32,057 


4,584 


683 


6,649 


- 


- 


44,785 


4,605 


1,084 


473 


45,772 
323 


39,220 
832 


223 
132 


2,255 


852,751 


12,298 


95,702 


1,431 


8,754 


- 


- 


258 


154,256 

518,615 

27 


1,981 


28,715 
14,887 
4,049 


_ 


3,842 
11 


894 
2,047 


" 


- 


5,834 
16,661 


1,925 


1,630 


379 
720 


a Not stated 




* Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



93 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Sbrvicb or RiLiBir Given 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 



$224 


$96,169 
26,391 


$91,723 
25,714 


$4,006 
23,264 


- 


66,002 


65,975 


39,140 


- 


21,725 


23,748 


13,383 


- 


438 
6,372 


438 
6,498 


3,767 


- 


6,880 


6,401 


1,858 


- 


182 

41,691 

14,392 

8,474 

7,545 


129 

38,737 

14,603 

9,631 

8,012 


2,080 
2,799 
4,609 


8,333*1 
11,781 J 

5,000*1 
30,490 / 


2,199 

37,788 
101,656 

343,391 


2,034 

27,110 
95,778 

339,396 


912 

21,515 
52,180 

293,728 


2,500 *\ 
14,700 J 


219,793 


191,122 


79,147 


5,688 


475 
27,215 


37 
23,335 


11,195 


^ 


13,318 
5,235 


13,191 
5,354 


250 

2,349 


5,570*1 

23,626 / 

10,000*1 

29,389 / 

500* 


3,563 

53,341 

291,738 

6,160 

263 

4 


3,114 

26,194 

278,463 

6,208 

253 


10,911 

136,609 
4,212 


3,500 


15,925 


13,337 


6,162 


1,500 


23,845 


17,547 


10,967 


456* 

10,500*1 

500 / 


89,850 
61,557 


89,050 
64,745 


37,478 
37,085 


- 


6,649 


6,662 


5,230 


1,500 


7,662 


6,933 


4,233 


2,500 

5,000*1 
43,715 / 


44,199 
967 

153,147 


43,061 
830 

127,730 


13,367 
100 

37,608 


- 


258 


332 


- 


12,776 


28,715 

27,663 

6,051 


39,502 

23,227 

6,093 


15,874 
4,552 
2,213 



2,047 



3,935 
720 



846 



4,241 
523 



1,536 



2,440 
320 



121 



4,643 470 

1,6842 -3 

4,409 1,932 



,730 
7 



7,367 

18 

230 



3,730 



1 
3,395 
7,367 

22Y 



400 * 



1 


19 
52 


3,608 
984 


1,208 


1 


204 


3,757 


140 


1 


90 


16,581 


16,142 


_ 


8 


392 


188 


I 


4 


220 

465 2 


220 



437 



31 


2,319 


105 


15 


118 


2 


4 


93 


93 



356 



5 

746 



679 



192 



40 



2 


15 


6U 


- 


- 


1 


227 
6 


9,477 
419 
275 


3,700 

48 

275 


327 

75 


- 


5 


2,021 


2,020 


756 


- 


10 


3,410 


1,291 


- 


- 


47 


6,785 


1,735 


- 


- 


36 


7622 


_3 


- 


- 


4 


_3 


-3 


- 


- 


7 


700 


190 


- 


: 


8 

1 


869 


339 


1,092 



35 



40 



22 



- 49 

- 50 



Name Changed to Jewish Women's Convalescent Home Association. 



6 Report not due. 



Report for 15 months. 



94 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Chatham 

1 Chatham Visiting Nurse Association, Incorporated . 

Chelsea 

2 Chebra Eadisha of Chelsea . 

3 Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home, 148 Shawmut 

St. . . 

4 Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Loan Association, The . 

5 Chelsea Hebrew Sheltering Home, 75 Ash St. . 

6 Chelsea Memorial Hospital, 100 Bellingham St. (75 beds) . 

7 Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, Inc., The 

8 Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association, 207 Shurtleff 

St 

9 Chevra Bikur Cholim of Chelsea 

10 Chevra Thilim & Gemilath Chesed Association, Inc. of 

Chelsea 

11 Community Aid Association of Chelsea, Massachusetts 

12 Hebrew Free Loan Association of Chelsea, 109 Third St. x . 

13 Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association .... 

14 Mishner Free Loan Association 

15 Old Ladies Home Associatioa of Chelsea, Massachusetts, 

3 Nichols St 

Clinton 

16 Clinton District NursingAssociation, Inc. 

17 Clinton Home for Aged People, The .... 

18 Clinton Hospital Association, The (59 beds) 

19 Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association 

20 Wanocksett Girl Scout Camp, Inc., The .... 

Cohasset 

21 Beechwood Improvement Association, Incorporated, The 1 

22 Bonnie. Bairns Association 

23 Cohasset Horse Show Association, Inc 

24 Sandy Beach Association 

Concord 

25 Concord Female Charitable Society, The 

26 Concord, Massachusetts, Girl Scouts, Incorporated, The 1 . 

27 Concord's Home for the Aged . 

28 Emerson Hospital in Concord (35 beds) .... 

29 New England Deaconess Association (Home for Aged 

Methodist Women) 

30 Women's Parish Association 

Dalton 

31 Berkshire Animal Rescue League 

32 W. Murray Crane Community House, Trustees of The 

33 Young Men's Christian Association of Dalton . 

34 Zenas Crane Fund for Student Aid Inc 

Danvbrs 

35 Danvers Home for the Aged 

36 Danvers Visiting Nurse Association .... 

37 New England Home for Deaf Mutes (Aged Blind or Infirm), 

The 

38 Putnam Home, Inc 

39 Robert A. MacFadden Educational Fund Inc. 

Dedham 

40 Andrew H. Hodgdon Memorial Fuad, Inc. 

41 Dedham Community Association, Inc 

42 Dedham Emergency Nursing Association, Inc. . 

43 Dedham Temporary Home for Women and Children 

44 Social Service Board of Dedham, Inc., The 

Dennis 

45 Ladies' Aid Society of Dennis, Inc. . . ... 

Duxbury 

46 Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The .... 

47 National Sailors Home 

Easthampton 

48 Easthampton Home for Aged Women 1 . 

49 Ella Clark Home for Aged People 

50 Helping Hand Society 



$1,246 



23,997 



1,772 



1,126 
392,271 



98,622 
15,754 



$1,365 



59 



946 
551 



2,277 



$585 



4,528 



49,725 
8,102 
5,089 


601 
210 
631 


1,535 
11,624 


$380 


212,878 
568 


81 
32 


100,250 
310 


2,384 
4 


160,004 
778 


4,353 
1,165 


6,951 
349 


- 


5,564 • 


565 
20.6 


240 


- 


1,174 
2,912 


3,059 
130 


2,275 
6,891 


35 


112,376 


132 


1,123 


4,865 


3,885 
145,101 
346,461 

6,267 
411 


164 

428 

5,432 

991 


2,677 

7,909 

43,981 

15 

1,358 


100 

3,821 

10^58 

461 

10 


7,619 
19,069 
35,310 


1,671 


1,870 
2,127 


483 


15,952 


658 


- 


553 


95,707 

169,495 


59 
7,185 


33,458 


4,309 
2,346 


42,928 
7,488 


7,039 
138 


2,510 
1,026 


4,504 
296 


12,469 
240,688 

99,837 
127,065 


147 

2,000 
27,341 


378 

580 
500 


825 
5,906 
3,545 
4,688 


109,435 
18,272 


315 
1,083 


167 
1,026 


3,882 
1,379 


254,695 

53,136 

650 


9,642 
441 


1,547 

1,235 

465 


7,484 

1,452 

16 


14,615 
42,321 
38,621 
79,111 
14,594 


1,866 
9,879 
7,022 
3,728 


43,227 

2,495 

8,840 

513 


389 

709 

2,976 

218 



206 
1,245 



24 



60 
10,249 



,574 
115 



None. 



Nolreport. 



3 Visits. 



* Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



95 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



and 
Wages 





Average 


Service or Relief Given 










Number 


Number 






Families 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Officers 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 




ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$1,950 



$1,972 



$1,554 



815 2 



- 


4,587 


8,959 


350 


2 


- 


- 


- 


$30 3 \ 
1,000 / 


2,516 

11,835 

631 

103,716 
347 


3,353 

11,071 

530 

102,459 
384 


1,211 
216 

44,879 


1 


3 

1 

82 


25 

814 

2,800 

2,796 


100 

2,800 

610 


65 


11,305 
1,579 


11,311 
2,032 


5,159 
203 


1 


7 

1 


454* 
824 


824 


- 


805 
206 


1,028 
206 


75 


1 


- 


364 


364 


- 


5,369 
7,021 


5,938 
6,726 


722 


- 


1 


95 
267 


95 
267 


- 


6,120 


5,155 


1,695 


- 


2 


8 


- 


2,680 


2,942 

14,839 

54,572 

1,467 

1,369 


2,923 
6,471 
58,957 
1,511 
1,274 


2,718 

2,350 

24,980 

260 


: 


2 

4 
49 

9 


3,5522 

12 

1,766 

45 

115 


672 

_5 

45 


- 


3,541 
2,611 


1,993 
2,218 


1,157 


_ 


2 


3,846 


_s 


150 


1,362 


1,375 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


300 
800 3 


4,668 
42,753 


3,073 
43,935 


1,318 
20,170 


- 


2 
28 


4 
1,161 


- 


- 


14,096 
1,512 


8,712 
2,474 


2,524 


- 


6 


20 


17 


- 


1,351 
5,906 
6,125 
5,188 


1,153 
5,490 
6,037 
5,144 


864 

4,190 
20 


- 


1 

4 

1 


1,586 6 

170< 
15 


-i 

_5 

10 


835 3 


4,364 
3,489 


4,137 
3,725 


1,878 
2,061 


1 


3 
1 


9 
391 


137 


12,641 s 


18,375 

3,129 

481 


18,160 

3,250 

575 


6,347 

1,455 

25 


1 
1 


7 
3 


32 

30 

5 


3 

_5 


400 

500 
1,757 
4,000 


789 

45,094 

13,584 

20,597 

8,459 


176 

43,225 

12,878 

21,564 

4,566 


1,413 
7,396 
8,477 
1,336 


1 


1 
7 

10 
1 


7 

_5 

1,649 

462 

2,780 


7 

_5 

1,154 
2,780 



200 



60 



10 



463 



334 



1,213 
12,045 


2,191 
14,156 


1,252 
2,700 


1 


1 
6 


2,574 
4,198 


730 
4,115 


1,920 


- 


2 


* Membership. 






'Not stated. 





116 387 

29 22 



160 



96 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings) 

and 
Refunds 



Interest. 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Easton 

1 Eastondale Community Club 

Essex 

2 Camp Chebacco, Inc. l 

Everett 

3 Albert N. Parlin House, Inc., Webster and Church Sts. 

4 Church Home Association, The, 79 Bucknam St. 

5 Everett Cottage Hospital, 108 Garland St. (81 beds) 

6 Everett Home for Aged Persons, 14 Hosmer St. 

7 Everett Young Men's Christian Association 

8 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett J . ... 

Fairhaven 

9 Fairhaven Benevolent Association 

10 Fairhaven King's Daughters Home for the Aged, Inc. 

11 Ladies Benevolent Society, The . . . 

Fall River 

12 Animal Rescue League of Fall River, 452 Durfee St. . 

13 Associacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo da Santissima 

Trindade, 207 Rhode Island Ave 

14 Association for Community Welfare in Fall River, The, 14 

Bank St 

15 Bishop Stang Day Nursery, The, 217 Third St. 

16 Boys Club of Fall River, 375 Anawan St. 

17 Children's Home of Fall River, 427 Robeson St. 

18 District Nursing Association of Fall River, Incorporated, 

14 Bank St 

19 Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society, The, 14 Bank St. » . 

20 Fall River Branch of the American Association of Uni- 

versity Women, The (excluding Ninth Street Day Nurs- 
ery), 37 Ninth St. 

21 Fall River Branch of the American Association of Uni- 

versity Women, The (Ninth Street Day Nursery), 37 
Ninth St 

22 Fall River Council of Girl Scouts, Inc., 14 Bank St. . 

23 Fall River Deaconess Home, The, 825 Second St. . 

24 Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Institution 1 

25 Fall River High School Alumni Scholarships, Trustees of . 

26 Fall River Jewish Community Center Building, Inc., 456 

South Main St 

27 Fall River Jewish Home for the Aged, Inc., 46 Forest St. . 

28 Fall River Women's Union, 101 Rock St. ... 

29 Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, 621 Second St. 

30 Hebrew Free School Society 

31 Home for Aged People in Fall River, 1168 Highland Ave. . 

32 Junior League of Fall River Inc., 187 Rock St. 6 

33 Mt. Lebanon Society, 341 Quequechan St. 

34 St. Anne's Hospital Corporation, 795 Middle St. (86 beds) 

35 Saint Joseph's Orphanage, 56 St. Joseph St. . 

36 Saint Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall River, The, 2860 

North Main St 

37 Servants of Relief for Incurable Cancer, The, Woodman and 

Bay Sts. (88 beds) 

38 Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The, 1820 Highland Ave. (94 

39 Union Hospital in Fall River, 538 Prospect St. (118 beds) ! 

40 Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Fall River 

41 Young Men's Christian Association of Fall River, 199 

North Main St 

Falmouth 

42 Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated . 

43 Lawrence High School Scholarship Association, Inc., of Fal- 

mouth, Mass., The 

Fitchbubg 

44 Burbank Hospital, Nichols St. (204 beds) 

45 Emergency Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Inc. 

46 Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg, The, 9 Prichard 

St 

47 Fitchburg Community Chest, Inc., 560 Main St. 

48 Fitehburg Council of Girl Scouts, Inc 

49 Fitchburg Helping Hand Association, 35 Holt St. . 

50 Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies, 30 Cedar St. . 

51 New England French American Home, 163 South St. 



$632 



181 



1,010,480 



18,788 
21,102 
1,500 
69,524 
235,150 
14,008 



236 



37,121 

8,758 

91,655 


910 

975 

4,224 


76,868 


1,584 


118,088 

20,953 

171,402 

17,790 

343 

692,538 

1,495 

6,010 

162,327 

502,250 


2,042 
1,490 
1,673 
2,491 
1,424 
6,053 
1,101 
1,050 

6,616 


199,715 


20,010 


204,075 


13,958 


1,019,700 

1,932,404 

7,238 


150 

7,053 

235 


441,756 


4,205 


25,798 


618 


2,169 


248 



490 
31 



78,531 

875 

99 

1,386 



90 



1,179 
2,287 



615 

3,481 
2,596 
2,900 
781 
1,364 
1,762 

68,569 
31,071 

5,206 



166,468 
135,171 



16,585 
6,928 

183,010 
521 



9,961 
4,037 



$2 



100,000 

496 

55,003 

43,551 

2,500 


$958 

2,824 

243 


$137,826 


1,654 
1,859 


52,856 

25,863 

1,265 


25 

1,886 

13 


3 

171 
267 


2,875 

827 

5 


79,305 


81 


979 


5,873 


1,697 


98 


143 


- 


72,110 
49,506 
543,773 
441,821 


4,232 

1,058 

8,147 

32 


737 

1,198 
2,935 
3,663 


4,046 

12,392 
10,399 


274,802 


7.198 


29.153 


23,398 



1,244 

243 

2,922 

3,302 



4,624 



29,496 
17 



1,865 
2,191 



2,859 

106,006 

302 

6,984 



311 
37 

9,190 

564 



8.765 
253 



None. 



1 No report. 



•Not stated. 



Pt. II. 



97 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 


















Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Service ob Relief Given 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 






tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 














ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 


zations 




- 


$8 


$23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 
2 


- 


958 


976 


$484 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 

4 


- 


142,305 


145,115 


55,037 


- 


99 


2,716 


43 


- 


- 


5 


- 


2,103 


3,170 


1,390 


- 


1 


8 


- 


- 


- 


6 

7 
8 




2,903 


3,146 


420 


1 


1 


125 


125 


75 


1 


9 


- 


2,886 


3,327 


1,075 


- 


2 


6 


- 


- 


- 


10 


- 


285 


275 


- 


- 


— 


~ 


~ 


3 


2 


11 


$1,000 


7,934 


6,071 


3,892 


1 


3 


4,445 2 


_3 


- 


- 


12 


- 


241 


127 


6 


- 


1 


_$ 


_3 


- 


- 


13 


2,500 « 


9,016 


6,721 


3,345 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


870 


_ 


14 


- 


2,257 


. 1,548 


- 


- 


- 


75 


6 


61 


- 


15 


- 


23,475 


23,807 


14,950 


- 


9 


2,830 s 


- 


- 


- 


16 


39,040 * 


20,095 


22,733 


9,764 


- 


8 


55 


18 


- 


- 


17 


3,000* 


59,751 


' 43,145 


35,736 


- 


26 


7,185 


3,839 


1,424 


- 


18 
19 


- 


326 


317 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


_ 


3,334 


3,603 


1,768 


_ 


4 


82 


2 


58 


j 


21 


- 


3,537 


3,299 


1,623 


- 


2 


_3 


_3 


- 


- 


22 


— 


9,369 


16,035 


4,596 


- 


9 


753 


723 


40 


4 


23 
24 


5,000 * 


4,887 


4,592 


- 


- 


- 


17 


17 


- 


- 


25 


- 


2,983 


2,923 


1,555 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


26 


50 


5,021 


4,739 


1,277 


- 


3 


19 


14 


- 


- 


27 


6,704 * 


8,893 


9,528 


5,158 


- 


18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


500 


5,891 


5,991 


— 


- 


- 


828 


828 


333 


- 


29 


- 


2,205 


2,143 


1,805 


- 


2 


48 


13 


- 


- 


30 


21,020* 


36,914 


21,540 


10,308 


1 


9 


27 


— 


- 


- 


31 


- 


2,895 


2,809 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


_3 


— 


- 


32 


- 


1,050 


1,059 


60 


- 


1 


- 


- 


6 


1 


33 


- 


68,569 


68,669 


28,702 


- 


79 


2,691 


1,067 


- 


- 


34 


- 


41,892 


39,026 


11,071 


- 


49 


606 


92 


- 


- 


35 


4,000 


32,917 


24,001 


4,525 


- 


16 


145 


78 


:- 


- 


36 


- 


13,958 


10,993 


2,578 


- 


12 


156 


156 


- 


- 


37 


27,226 


197,433 


186,401 


82,377 


-3 


131 


2,434 


391 


_ 


_ 


38 


17,102* 


251,078 


206,032 


90,696 


1 


157 


10,560 


401 


- 


- 


39 


- 


537 


979 


600 


- 


1 


- 


- 


40 


- 


40 


5,440* 


28,079 


36,768 


17,444 


" 


12 


6845 


- 


- 


- 


41 


- 


7,856 


8,810 


6,641 


- 


4 


307 


99 


- 


- 


42 


- 


285 


454 


- 


- 


- 


7 


7 


- 


- 


43 


_ 


196,396 


196,398 


99,211 


2 


148 


3,863 


1,870 


, 




44 


™ 


31 


7,655 


- 


- 


- 


5,240 


5,240 


- 


1 


45 


- 


17,310 


17,266 


4,585 


_ 


4 


- 


_ 


545 


«. 


46 


- 


78,989 


67,244 


1,494 


— 


1 


— 


- 


— 


11 


47 


- 


875 


875 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


10 


48 


- 


10,060 


9,524 


3,779 


- 


8 


100 


- 


- 




49 


— 


12,803 


10,100 


4,446 


2 


4 


28 


- 


— 


• 


50 




2,019 


2,018 


355 


~ 


2 


24 


17 


~ 


~ 


51 



♦Restricted to capital. 



* Membership. 



Report for 11 months. 



98 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Rifts 

Restnoted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



$365 



6,925 
6,000 


8,036 
10,504 


17,782 


12,725 


9,203 


2,108 


296 

1,203 

4,583 

28,358 


2,160 
1,713 
5,638 


3,500 


1,173 


22,191 

76 

3,068 


106,806 
1,796 
2,023 



Fitchburg— Con. 

1 Northern Worcester County Public Health Association, 

Inc., 12 Grove St $9,150 $7,493 

2 Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The, 16 Hart- 

wellSt 24,217 

3 Wachusett Children's Aid Society, 47 Holt St. . . . 52,563 

4 Young Men's Christian Association of Fitchburg, 525 Main 

St 199,780 

FOXBOROUGH 

5 Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, Inc. . . 123,467 

Framingham 

6 Bethel Home for the Aged 10,194 

7 Christian Workers' Union 25,694 

8 Framingham Civic League, Inc 134,222 

9 Framingham Community Chest, Inc 7,269 

10 Framingham Community Health Association, Incor- 

porated 29 

11 Framingham Hospital 182,579 

12 Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., The (122 beds) . . 620,138 

13 Home for Aged Men and Women in Fraaiingham . . 136,327 

14 Southwestern Middlesex Public Health Association, Inc. . 8,876 

15 Union Avenue Hospital Inc - 

Franklin 

16 Frances Eddy King Student Fund, Inc., The . . . 1,369 25 

17 Young Men's Christian Association of Franklin, The 1 

Gardner 

18 Gardner Home for Elderly People, The, 162 Pearl St. . 138,454 

19 Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital, The, 242 Green St. (74 

beds) ... 890,857 

20 Monadnock Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 290 Cen- 

tral St. . 11 

Georgetown 

21 Carleton Home, Trustees of the 46,892 

Gloucester 

22 Addison Gilbert Hospital, The, 298 Washington St. (67 

beds) 904,862 

23 Annisquam Association, Inc 11,361 

24 Associated Charities of Gloucester, The, Dale Ave. . . 5,346 

25 Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons, The, 1 West- 

ern Ave 111,621 

26 Gloucester District Nursing Association, 148 Main St. . 19,165 

27 Gloucester Female Charitable Association, 88 Middle St. . 69,342 

28 Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows and Orphans 

Aid Society 77,082 

29 Gloucester Fishermen's Institute, 8 Duncan St. . . 125,996 

30 Gloucester Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, Inc., 14 Pros- 

pect St. 1 

31 Huntress Home, 110 Prospect St 85,222 

32 Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia 1 

33 Young Men's Christian Association of Gloucester* Mass., 

71 Middle St 201,786 

Goshen 

34 International Medical Missionary Society, The . . 26,692 

Great Barrington 

35 Fairview Hospital (49 beds) 433,348 

36 Visiting Nurse Association of Great Barrington, Mass., The 27,611 

Greenfield 

37 Franklin County Public Health Association . . . 3,903 

38 Franklin County Public Hospital, The (91 beds) . . 425,089 

39 Girls' Club of Greenfield, Massachusetts, The . . . 8,465 

40 Greenfield Health Camp, Inc 6,728 

41 Greenfield Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. The . . 7,457 

42 Home for the Aged People of Franklin County . . 110 

Hamilton 

43 Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, Incor- 

porated 679 

44 Visiting Nurse Association of Hamilton and Wenham, Inc. . 

-None. i No report. a Not stated. » Restricted to capital. 



$650 
1,653 



1,156 



3,147 



5,464 



- 


524 


5,365 


- 


81,130 


13,287 


2,946 


5 


- 


10 


- 


2,531 


335 
1,205 


60,116 

1,184 

29 


17,874 
75 
108 


1,047 
16 


650 
1,394 


4,204 

647 

1,918 


1,000 
1,722 


4,746 


3,183 
4,150 


2,558 




2,212 


7,357 


9,850 


2,900 


2,670 


2,603 


485 


2,273 
5,431 


29,782 
3,735 


7,214 
800 


4,037 
33,385 
1,873 
3,042 
1,865 


581 

64,934 

299 

5,025 


77 

6,546 

263 

35 
222 


937 
1,976 


3,920 
248 


- 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



99 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 




$200 
7,9153 

19,700 


$9,359 

15,812 
18,157 

31,663 

14,250 

2,456 
2,917 
10,221 
28,358 

4,673 
9,386 
128,648 
7,336 
5,091 

64 


$9,621 

15,868 
18,294 

31,154 

8,692 

2,341 
2,802 
10,715 
27,485 

4,736 
9,386 
128,364 
8,869 
5,077 


$4,335 

13,289 
4,302 

14,181 

2,957 

260 

360 

3,913 

836 

3,776 

47,580 
3,424 
1,073 


1 

1 
1 


16 

10 

7 

10 
6 

4 

1 

2 

59 
6 
8 


114 

3,555 
156 

_2 

20 

16 

^2 

543 

2,374 
13 
53 


1,984 
95 

_2 

1 
_2 

326 
37 


302 


12 

8 
1 
16 


1 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 
/ 
3 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 



5,889 


3,700 


1,330 


94,417 


85,123 


41,974 


2,951 


3,008 


2,100 



2 


6 


- 


74 


1,865 


24 


1 


_2 


_2 



2,542 



3,239 



795 



77,991 
1,594 
1,343 


95,086 
1,397 
1,380 


39,366 
360 
533 


4,854 
3,088 
1,934 


4,610 
3,930 
2,185 


2,170 

2,488 
325 


4,183 
10,619 


4,268 
11,511 


297 

7,976 


4,775 


4,617 


2,176 


20,841 


23,375 


14,032 


5,760 


5,633 


1,433 



- 18 

- 19 

- 20 



79 
3 


3,193 
153 

_2 


587 
43 

_2 


" 


- 


3 

2 
1 


10 

367 
16 


51 

16 


331 

167 


1 
1 


5 


143 
100,000* 


143 


- 


- 


4 


7 


- 


- 


- 


12 


992 s 


_2 


- 


105 


5 


124 


6 


_ 


_ 



5,000 3 
5,000 » 


39,270 
9,966 


40,548 
9,044 


19,180 
5,978 


~ 


21 

7 


604 
1,450 


58 
1,226 


- 


- 


35 
36 


^ 


4,695 
105,841 
2,436 
3,078 
7,120 


5,324 
106,342 
2,540 
3,217 
8,639 


2,300 
41,606 
1,619 
1,173 
6,677 


~ 


2 
70 

2 
12 

4 


1,443 
260 5 
144 

7,977° 


_2 

144 

1,727 6 


424 


- 


37 
38 
39 
40 
41 












" 


" 


" 






i'J, 


- 


4,902 
2,224 


4,496 
2,478 


1,770 
1,873 


- 


1 
1 


2,000 
969 6 


1,000 
703 6 


58 


32 


43 
44 



Attendance. 



Membership. 



6 Visits. 



100 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



N AMK AND ADDRESS 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



27 



Harwich 
Harwich Visiting Nurse Association Incorporated . 

Haverhill 
Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, Inc., 22 

Essex St. . 

Esodia Theotokou Scalohoriton Lesvou, Inc. x . 

Family Welfare Society of Haverhill 

General Gale Hospital Aid Association 

Haverhill Boys Club Association, 55 Emerson St. . 

Haverhill Children's Aid Society, 191 Merrimack St. 

Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) . 

Haverhill Day Nursery Association, 64 Pecker St. 

Haverhill Female Benevolent Society 

Haverhill Hebrew Sheltering Home, Inc., 23 Gilbert Ave 

Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated 

Haverhill Union Mission, Inc., 100 Winter St. . 

Haverhill Young Men's Christian Association, 175 Main St. 

Haverhill Young Women's Christian Association, 107 

Winter St. ....... 

Italian Welfare Society, 45 Columbia Park 

Linwood O. Towne Scholarship Association, The, Haver 

hill High School 

Mary F. Ames Convalescents' Home, Inc., The, 26 Sum 

mer St 

Massachusetts Pythian Sisters' Home Association, The, 187 

Mill St 

Old Ladies Home Association, 337 Main St. 

Sarah A. White Home for Aged Men, The, 170 Main St. 

Social Circle of the Portland Street Church, The 

Hingham 
Hingham Girl Scout Council, Inc. ..... 

Hingham Memorial Hospital, Inc., The 1 .... 

Hingham Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

Holden 
Holden District Hospital Inc. (30 beds) . 

Holtoke 
Community Welfare League of Holyoke, Massachusetts, 

Incorporated, 328 Maple St. 1 

Holyoke Boys' Club Association, The, 346 Race St. 7 . 

Holyoke Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 362 Dwight 



St. 



Holyoke Day Nursery, Incorporated, 159 Chestnut St. 
Holyoke Family Welfare Society, Inc., 328 Maple St. 
Holyoke Hebrew Free Loan Society, 300 Park St. 
Holyoke Home for Aged People, 1 Loomis Ave. l 
Holyoke Home Information Center, Inc., 330 Maple St 
Holyoke Hospital, 509 Beech St. (106 beds) . 
Holyoke Junior Achievement Foundation, Inc., 70 Essex St 
Holyoke Society for the Care of Crippled Children, Inc. 
Holyoke Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 328 Maple St. 

Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association, The, 367 

High St 

Ladies Hebrew Free Loan Society, 300 Park St. 
Sisters of Providence (See below and also Adams): 
Sisters of Providence (Beaven-Kelly Home), Springfield 

Rd. 

Sisters of Providence (Brightside Orphans' and Bethle- 
hem Homes), Springfield Rd 

Sisters of Providence (House of Providence Hospital and 
Father Harkins' Home for Aged Women), 679 Dwight 

St. (105 beds) 

Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home for Girls), 

Springfield Rd 

Skinner Coffee House, Incorporated, 60 Hamilton St. 

United Hebrew Charities of Holyoke, Inc. 

White Cross Afisociation for Graduate Nurses of Holyoke, 

Mass 

Young Women's Christian Association of Holyoke, The, 315 
Maple St 



$950 



6,302 



$2,113 



$355 



65,989 



127,161 



188,267 

51,703 

160,592 

745 

3,353 

87,721 



5,029 



6,616 



1,671 

3,589 

9,500 

243 

5,386 



35,856 



531 



126,614 

15,836 

558 

1,075 



5,074 



$12 



236 



2,653 

1,306 

149,602 

164,771 

1,192 


15 

3 

1,520 

276 

277 


63 

1 

717 

1,143 

465 


77 

79 

4,040 

7,281 

18 


50,552 
119,961 


509 
35 


706 


1,243 
1,712 


2,915 
13,323 
64,989 


560 

314 

6,128 


2,374 
7,807 


188 
21 
18 


39,070 
1,031 


1,194 
943 


2,411 
588 


707 
5 


2,912 


- 


20 


11 


113,468 


- 


- 


351 


22,592 


786 


601 


257 


282,745 

142,582 

500 


389 
42 


1,607 
212 


11,667 
6,162 


15,297 


368 


854 


- 


13,367 


2,066 


2,853 


- 



1.002 



434 



75,000 
2,245 
8,211 


10,221 

10,120 

820 


1,211 
25,244 


_ 


5,123 

740,642 

126 

233 

2,739 


8,723 
27,973 
3,358 
2,550 
5,410 


94,328 

145 

165 

6,193 


137 
13,791 

18 


222,768 
3,315 


10,307 
187 


24,811 
8,192 


140 


51,298 


2,217 


16,166 


- 


169,011 


3,278 


32,474 


- 



2,090 

110 

1,010 



None. 1 No report. 2 Visits. 3 Not stated. * Membership. s Restricted to capital. 8 Attendance. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



101 



Continued. 







Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Sbrvicb or Rblibf Givin 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 
tures 


and 
Wages 


of Paid 
Officers 


of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 


Organi- 
zations 






















viduals 








- 


$2,481 


$2,786 


$1,799 


- 


1 


1,4442 


_3 


257 


- 


1 




- 


236 


525 


- 


- 


- 


1 


11 


11 


- 


2 
3 
4 




. 


156 


147 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


_ 




- 


84 


67 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


5 


1 


5 


$12,4 


18,748 


6,413 


4,572 


- 


3 


1,000* 


- 


- 


- 


6 




500 


9,200 


8,465 


1,485 


1 


2 


575 


26 


115 


- 


7 




- 


760 


638 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


8 


{ 


3,500 s 


} 2,960 




















500 


2,494 


1,095 


- 


2 


76 


4 


1 


1 


9 




- 


1,747 


3,060 


780 


3 


3 


774 


774 


421 


- 


10 
11 
12 




_ 


748 


1,529 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 




- 


2,709 


2,901 


1,217 


- 


3 


1,522 


1,491 


108 


- 


13 




2,271 


16,319 


15,925 


5,141 


1 


5 


486* 


- 


- 


- 


14 




500 


4,812 


4,968 


2,540 


_ 


4 


20 


_3 


- 


17 


15 




- 


1,537 


653 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


27 


- 


16 




- 


31 


35 


- 


- 


- 


,- 


- 


- 


- 


17 




- 


351 


65 


- 


- 


- 


31 


5 


- 


- 


18 




- 


1,721 


3,264 


1,285 


_ 


1 


5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


{ 


4,5005 


/ 23,298 




















9,635 


14,514 


6,352 


1 


7 


25 


- 


- 


- 


20 




- 


6,165 


1,019 


382 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 




~ 


255 


290 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 




- 


1,222 


788 


- 


- 


- 


161* 


_s 


- 


- 


23 
24 




~ 


4,922 


4,289 


2,108 


- 


2 


186 


19 


- 


2 


25 




- 


41,888 


42,878 


11,816 


- 


12 


841 


93 


- 


~ 


26 
27 


{ 


685 < 


/ 8,534 




















951 


8,912 


5,867 


- 


10 


1,500 


150 


- 


- 


28 
























29 




1,998 s 


9,221 


11,416 


4,620 


- 


14 


210 


136 


234 


4 


30 




272 


11,604 


11,491 


5,937 


- 


5 


- 


- 


1,424 


- 


31 




~ 


26,064 


25,583 


76 


1 


- 


104 


100 


- 


- 


32 
33 




- 


8,860 


8,924 


6,862 


- 


11 


748 


748 


- 


- 


34 




- 


137,190 


142,872 


63,267 


- 


73 


4,369 


1,617 


- 


- 


35 




- 


3,504 


3,455 


2,441 


- 


5 


1,111 


671 


- 


2 


36 


{ 


685 • 
425 


2,715 
J 12,048 


2,626 


1,290 


- 


1 


245 


163 


- 


- 


37 


11,078 


9,668 


- 


8 


17,023 2 


9,3945 


1,741 


- 


38 




900 


36,158 


36,339 


18,867 


1 


11 


1,2114 


-3 




67 


39 






8,380 


8,570 


" 


— 


— 


~ 


~ 


75 


** 


40 
41 




- 


18,383 


18,438 


4,781 


- 


10 


82 


3 


- 


- 


42 




5,775 


41,528 


41,519 


6,829 


- 


_a 


236 


14 


. - 


- 


43 




- 


128,286 


116,918 


36,605 


- 


161 


4,556 


461 


- 


- 


44 




- 


19,425 


19,570 


3,336 


_ 


10 


111 


13 


_ 


_ 


45 




. - 


12,148 


12,337 


6,150 


- 


10 


3,212 


2,061 


5 


3 


46 




- 


1,319 


1,492 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


4 


47 




- 


110 


150 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


- 


- 


48 




- 


11,480 


12,134 


6,829 


- 


7 


1,731 


5 


- 


11 


49 



Report for 14 months. 



102 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



$2,006 



HOPEDALE 

1 Hopedale Community House, Inc $629,664 $572 

Hudson 

2 Hudson Community Health Association, Incorporated . 905 926 

Hull 

3 Father Andrew O'Brien Memorial Association, Inc., of 

Hull* 

Ipswich 

4 Coburn Charitable Society . ... 

5 Ipswich Hospital (operating Benjamin Stickney Cable 

Memorial Hospital) (25 beds) 

Lancaster 

6 Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, Trustees of the 

7 Lancaster Social Service Association . . . ' - . 

Lawrence 

8 Cardinal Gibbons Club l ...... 

9 German Old Folks' Home of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 374 

Howard St 

10 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence .... 

11 Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate, The, 189 

Maple St 

12 International Association of Y's Men's Clubs, The . 

13 Lawrence Boys' Club, 155 Haverhill St 

14 Lawrence City Mission, 31 Jackson St 

15 Lawrence Community Chest, Inc., 155 Haverhill St. 

16 Lawrence General Hospital, 30 Garden St. (107 beds) 

17 Lawrence Home for Aged People, The, 150 Berkeley St. x . 

18 Lawrence Tuberculosis League, Inc., 31 Jackson St. . 

19 Lawrence Young Men's Christian Association, 40 Law- 

rence St •'•„'• 

20 Lawrence Young Women's Christian Association, 38 Law- 

rence St 

21 Lithuanian National Catholic Vytautas Old Folks' Home, 

Inc. . . 

22 Maronite Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence, 10 Lowell St. . 

23 North Essex Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 31 Jack- 

son St 

24 Patriotic Society of Habossi, Incorporated 

25 Russell-Hood Trust, Incorporated 1 .... 

26 United Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Association, 85 Concord 

St.i 

27 United Syrian Society of Lawrence, Mass., 381 Chestnut 

St 

Lee 

28 Ascension Farm School, The Corporation of the 

Leicester 

29 Leicester Samaritan Association 

Lenox 

30 Berkshire County Home for Aged Women (Meadow Place 

Branch) (See also Pittsfield) 

31 Lenox Visiting Nurse Association 

Leominster 

32 Leominster Community Chest, Inc., 5 West St. 

33 Leominster Home for Old Ladies, The, 16 Pearl St. . 

34 Leominster Hospital Association, Hospital Rd. (53 beds) . 

35 Wachusett Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 11 Park 

St 

Lexington 

36 Amanda Caroline Payson Education Fund for Girls, Inc. . 

37 Isaac Harris Cary Educational Fund .... 

38 Lexington Home for Aged People 

39 Lexington Public Health Association Inc. . . . 5,538 

Lincoln 

40 Farrington Memorial, Incorporated . . . . 297,667 

Lowell 

41 Ahepa Charitable Bureau, Inc. 1 

- None. 1 No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Visits. 4 Membership. 5 Restricted to capital. 



$16,840 
28 



141,150 


- 


286,035 


2,153 


12,037 
20,339 


361 


31,278 
938 


768 
759 


131,618 

1,340 

73,611 

14,701 

11,225 

802,395 


15,372 
7,007 
7,204 
12,207 
94,636 
16,499 


19,593 


6,858 


246,277 


10,457 


162,232 


14,178 


28,538 
4,626 


53 
270 


7,829 
5,468 


4,822 
346 


8,246 


640 


88,662 


4,930 


5,555 


154 


312,875 
7,210 


5 

962 


838 
152,208 
364,036 


15,545 
1,867 


30 


4,799 


40,087 
227,094 
82,571 


1,759 



2,450 



100 



1,008 


6,477 


18,674 


4,539 


670 


372 
830 



532 
365 

21,425 

2,168 

1,281 

771 

113,679 

1,629 

37,922 

8,373 

6,178 
163 

2,971 



1,941 

3,513 

815 



J.016 
278 



1,200 
50,987 

456 

9 

22 
330 



1,094 
25 



1,542 
815 

31,054 

1,267 
418 



74 
415 
156 



12,228 
211 



4 
7,439 
1,831 



1,258 
10,563 
2,478 



134 



10,032 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



103 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Sebvice or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



1,000 



/ 2,100 H 
1 100/ 



$19,419 $12,271 

1,884 1,982 



738 



10,132 



11,867 



$5,652 



- 


7,497 


8,353 


3,467 


$51,059 


76,427 


26,581 


12,584 


2,500 


372 
4,362 


333 
2,402 


1,530 


- 


2,395 
1,150 


5,060 
1,40,4 


1,824 


1,089 

500 
3,000 


37,887 
9,301 
10,027 
14,294 
94,636 
161,004 


37,504 
8,321 
10,088 
14,132 
98,858 
153,194 


10,361 
2,253 
6,068 
6,663 
4,276 

73,728 


- 


8,487 


6,880 


2,356 


500 « 


49,646 


61,261 


24,054 


500 


23,601 


21,539 


13,253 


_ 


6,431 
432 


6,103 
815 


699 



3,157 



2,656 


3,097 


1,802 


9,858 


10,776 


3,434 


1,126 


857 


442 


15,249 
1,451 


9,172 
2,141 


4,070 
1,521 


15,550 

8,670 

54,687 


14,884 

7,024 

47,654 


959 
3,026 
19,004 


5,256 


5,084 


3,878 


1,267 
10,563 


519 
9,354 


300 


4,360 
2,915 


7,092 
4,210 


3,069 
2,416 



,908 



40 



9 
364 



409 « 



1 


5 


146 


27 


- 


- 


14 


491 


10 


- 


- 


1 


13 
341 


13 
248 


66 


1 


2 


18 
120 


120 


80 


1 

1 

1 


35 
5 
5 
6 
2 
127 


263 
1,462* 

4,102 


117 
_a 

1,302 


40 
1,020 


- 


6 


99 


80 


- 


- 


18 


2,850* 


- 


- 


- 


13 


21,675 • 


20,480 • 


200 


- 


6 


11 


8 


- 




2 


_a 


_3 




- 


- 


18 


18 


18 



21 


- 


- 


4 


24 


10 


1 


206 


78 


5 

1 


10 
315 


205 


1 

3 

20 


13 
2,948 


629 



40 
250 



158 



150 



264 



* Attendance. 



104 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends , 

Annuities 

and Rental i 



36 



Lowell— Con. 
L'Association Educatrice Franco-Americaine Inc., 121 

School St 

Ayer Home, Trustees of the, 159 Pawtucket St. 2 

Battles Home, The, 93 Rolfe St 

Channing Fraternity 

Children's Home, 648 Central St. 1 

Faith Home, 249 Westford St 

Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowell, 36 John St. . 
Horn Home for Aged Couples, The, 98 Smith St. 2 . 

Humphrey O'Sullivan Fund, Inc 

Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, The, 63 Howard 

St. i 

Ladies Helping Hand Society, The, 63 Howard St. . 
Lowell Association for the Blind, Inc., 36 John St. . 
Lowell Boys Club Association, 227 Dutton St. . 
Lowell Community Chest Association, Inc., 34 John St. . 
Lowell Day Nursery Association, 119 Hall St. . 

Lowell Dispensary 

Lowell General Hospital, The, Varnum Ave. (150 beds) . 
Lowell Goodwill Industries, Inc., The, 85 French St 
Lowell Hebrew Co mmuni ty Center, Inc., 105 Princeton 

Boulevard 

Lowell Humane Society, The, 97 Central St. . 

Lowell Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent de 

Paul, 8 Merrimack St 

Lowell Social Service League, Inc., 36 John St. 

Lowell Textile Associates, Inc. 6 

Lowell Tuberculosis Association, Inc., 36 John St. 
Lowell Visiting Nurse Association, 1 Dutton St. 

Lowell Welfare Foundation, The 1 

Lowell Young Men's Christian Association, 272 Merrimack 

St 

Ministry-at-Large in Lowell, 150 Middlesex St. 

Old Ladies* Home, 520 Fletcher St 

L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain, 249 Pawtucket St. . 
Phileducational Association of Georgitsiotes, "Socrates" x . 
Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St. Peter's Orphan 

Asylum), 530 Stevens St 

Saint John's Hospital, 14 Bartlett St. (143 beds) 

St. Joseph's Hospital, Inc., 830 Merrimack St. (83 beds) . 

Young Women's Christian Association of Lowell, 50 John St. 

Ludlow 
Ludlow Hospital Society (28 beds) 



Ltnn 

Aid Society of the Lynn Day Nursery, The, 15 Church St. 

Associated Charities of Lynn, The, 23 Central Ave. . 

Associated Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew 
Association of New England District No. 2 Camp, Inc " 

Boys' Club of Lynn, 25 North Common St. 

Camp Rotary, Inc., of Lynn, Mass. ._ # . 

Charitable Travelers Sheltering Association, Inc., 53 
Wheeler St. 

Columbus Guild of Lynn, 121 North Common St. . 

Community Fund Association of Greater Lynn, 90 Ex 
change St. 

Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples, 159 Washington St 

Greek Women's Aid Society of Lynn, Mass., 11 Church St. : 

Harris Goldman Charity Fund, Inc., The, 25 Central Sq." 

Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn, The 

J. Fergus Gifford Shoe and Stocking Fund of the Lynn Ro- 
tary Club, Inc 

Junior Aid Society, Inc. 

Lynn Association for the Blind, Inc. 

Lynn Council, Boy Scouts of America, 31 Exchange St. 

Lynn Gold Star Mothers, Inc.. 36 Market St. 1 

Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Society . 

Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Helping-Hand Society, The 

Lynn Home for Aged Men, 34 Forest St. 

Lynn Home for Aged Women, 37 Breed St. 

Lynn Home for Children, 15 Church St. . 

Lynn Home for Young Women, 144 Broad St. 

Lynn Hospital, 212 Boston St. (123 beds) 

Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association, The . 

Lynn Tuberculosis League, 136 Broad St. 10 

Lynn Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 136 Broad St 



$8,572 

361,627 

122,606 

10,320 


$181 
610 


$303 
798 


43,063 
13,685 
39,605 


500 
2,080 
1,554 


205 
1,200 


1,436 

1,611 

91,679 

72,291 

113,588 

6,874 

2,578,553 

59 


257 

744 

6,637 

105,535 

320 

1,627 


1,213 
186 

1,658 

106,867 
17,684 


88,248 
61,117 


8,644 
240 


217 
682 


369 

756 

13,440 

4,087 

8,011 


13,260 

615 

5,129 

10,751 


195 
1,166 
5,348 

17,791 


386,648 

79,374 

375,013 

134,078 


10,039 

175 

97 

3,917 


23,664 

4,502 
17,461 


104,771 
423,913 
182,683 
176,502 


10,448 
4,130 
2,551 

11,473 


1,503 

122,695 

83,028 

19,744 



18,037 



$6 

11,686 

4,479 

372 

752 
392 
615 



97 



819 
4,097 



65,186 



3 
4,304 



706 



4,400 

2,871 

10,175 

649 



7,325 

592 

3,450 



- None. 



No report. 



2 Report for 11 months. 



31,950 


6,923 


5,745 


1,300 


27,046 


13,822 


1,042 


1,672 


112,838 


10,643 


2,054 


1,636 


18,119 


1,519 


300 


- 


6,744 


1,256 


- 


- 


27,686 


668 


4,292 


88 


29,111 


134,520 


- 


86 


99,075 


1,200 


287 


3,772 


- 


1,331 


- 


- 


3,237 


1,035 


- 


- 


2,586 


773 


2,734 


25 


10,171 


— 


- 


338 


21,380 


8,324 


6,842 


- 


1,462 


345 


1,177 


- 


57 


300 


10 


— 


265,110 




457 


11,081 


488,955 


563 


2,940 


20,094 


55,535 


299 


4,032 


2,688 


113,680 


118 


7,723 


3,827 


1,320,081 


18,940 


158,436 


17,325 


_ 


289 


755 


— 


1,412 


1,928 


- 


- 


11,527 


4,180 


6,245 


50 


8 Restricted to 


capital. 


* Not stated. 


* Animals. 



Pt. II. 


















105 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 
















Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Service or Relief Given 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 
zations 






tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 














ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 




















viduals 








$491 


$557 








12 


12 






1 


- 


12,484 


12,411 


$4,245 


- 


11 


65 


65 


- 


- 


2 


$1183 


4,489 


3,719 


1,482 


- 


3 


14 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


372 


347 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 
5 
6 


17,550 


18,928 


3,720 


1,300 


_ 


2 


9 


5 


_ 


_ 


214 


2,911 


2,985 


1,548 


- 


2 


140 


133 


84 


52 


7 


- 


3,370 


3,118 


803 


- 


1 


12 


- 


- 


- 


8 
9 
10 






















_ 


1,470 


1,280 


30 


1 


_ 


8 


8 


10 


_ 


11 


- 


1,028 


1,087 


300 


1 


1 


152 


152 


- 


- 


12 


- 


6,637 


6,636 


4,852 


- 


3 


-4 


-4 


- 


- 


13 


- 


106,355 


120,216 


4,927 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


15 


14 


- 


6,077 


5,100 


2,715 


- 


5 


197 


13 


8 


- 


15 


- 


203 


119 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


16 


255,807 s 


172,618 


129,134 


47,984 


1 


102 


5,803 


3,107 


- 


- 


17 


- 


19,311 


19,267 


3,248 


- 


3 


158 


_4 


- 


- 


18 


_ 


8,879 


8,942 


3,881 


_ 


3 


-4 


-4 


_ 


_ 


19 


1,075 


6,302 


5,955 


3,728 


- 


3 


33,9625 


_4 


- 


- 


20 


_ 


195 


401 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,625 


_4 


480 


_ 


21 


250 


14,676 


14,022 


4,187 


- 


4 


- 


- 


785 


- 


22 


- 


6,865 


5,888 


- 


- 


- 


9 


9 


- 


- 


23 


- 


5,129 


5,781 


3,030 


- 


2 


-4 


-4 


- 


- 


24 


550 


29,384 


31,280 


26,388 


- 


22 


32,4008 


9,1188 


3,430 


- 


25 
26 


_ 


38,104 


38,448 


21,077 


_ 


15 


3,925 


310 


_ 


_ 


27 


- 


3,046 


2,461 


- 


- 


- 


8 


8 


12 


1 


28 


7,446 


22,288 


21,449 


5,884 


- 


9 


43 


- 


- 


- 


29 


" 


22,028 


23,610 


6,009 


- 


36 


249 


33 


- 


- 


30 
31 


_ 


12,050 


9,616 


3,560 


_ 


11 


114 


7 


_ 


_ 


32 


- 


134,150 


131,935 


47,682 


- 


130 


14,827 


8,659 


- 


- 


33 


- 


87,392 


70,063 


18,123 


- 


75 


l 9,235 


60 


- 


- 


34 


1 307 3 


J 35,068 




















I 400 


35,095 


20,744 


- 


26 


34,866 


3,007 


- 


- 


35 


- 


24,207 


19,922 


9,648 


- 


12 


597 


_4 


- 


- 


36 


_ 


13,969 


13,914 


4,971 


_ 


6 


2,223 


407 


_ 


_ 


37 


~ 


16.542 


19,512 


5,588 


~ 


4 


_ 


- 


2,043 


- 


38 


_ 


14,334 


14,156 


6,940 


_ 


19 


1,6539 


369 9 


_ 




39 
40 


- 


1,819 


2,278 


- 


- 


- 


59 


59 


- 


- 


41 


_ 


1,256 


1,187 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


7 


_ 


_ 


42 


- 


5,049 


5,863 


1,181 


- 


2 


387 


_4 


88 


- 


43 


- 


134,606 


137,813 


4,530 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25 


44 


1,443 


6,704 


5,632 


2,545 


1 


3 


13 


~ 


- 


- 


45 
46 


- 


1,331 


1,331 


314 


- 


1 


- 


- 


65 


- 


47 
48 


_ 


1,035 


987 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


424 


_ 


49 


- 


3,532 


3,861 


- 


- 


- 


-4 


-4 


3 


2 


50 


- 


338 


266 


- 


- 


- 


30 


30 


20 


1 


51 


- 


14,926 


15,043 


6,289 


2 


2 


2,0829 


_4 


- 


- 


52 
53 
54 


- 


1,523 


1,332 


_ 


_ 


_ 


49 


49 


_ 


_ 


— 


310 


345 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


1 


55 


4673 


11,539 


9,740 


1,974 


- 


3 


16 


- 


- 


- 


56 


2,553 


26,152 


15,166 


4,766 


1 


6 


40 


8 


- 


- 


57 


- 


6,960 


7,519 


1,633 


- 


2 


65 


19 


- 




r )X 


3,000 


14,669 


13,479 


5,430 


1 


9 


20 


- 


- 


15 


59 


8,779 s 


200,701 


202,506 


90,529 


-4 


110 


35,607 


15,116 


- 


- 


80 


- 


1,045 


1,045 


- 


- 


- 


45 


_4 


- 


- 


51 


- 


1,928 


2,521 


1,274 


- 


1 


103 


103 


- 


- 


i2 


358 


10,834 


10,872 


9,076 


~ 


6 


11,7988 


3,8458 


~ 


- 


33 


8 Report for I 


months. 


7 Attendance. 8 


Visits. 


* Membership. 


1 Report for 14 months. 





106 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Lynn— Con. 

1 Mirabeau Fresh Air Camp, Inc 

2 Neighborhood House Association, 53 Neptune St. 

3 Pullman Mission 

4 Union Hospital, Linwood Rd. (65 beds) . 

5 Women's Union for Christian Work incorporated at Lynn 

6 Young Men's Christian Association of Lynn, 85 Market St 

Malden 

7 Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation, The, 22 Ferry St. 

8 Associated Charities of Maiden, The, 15 Ferry St. . 

9 Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc., The, 80 Mountain 

Ave. 

10 Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, Inc., The, 22 

Parker St. (See also Ayer) 

11 Maiden Arbeiter Ferein, Inc. 1 

12 Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association, The 1 . 

13 Maiden High School Scholarship, Inc. . . . ' ■ . 

14 Maiden Home for Aged Persons, The, 578 Main St. . 

15 Maiden Hospital, The, Murray Hill Rd. (177 beds) . 

16 Maiden Hospital Associates, Incorporated, 15 Ferry St. x . 

17 Maiden Industrial Aid Society, The, 15 Ferry St. . 

18 Maiden Tuberculosis and Health Association, Inc., 15 Ferry 

St 

19 Maiden Young Men's Christian Association, The, 83 Pleas- 

ant St 

20 Monday Club of Maiden, The 

21 Quannapowitt Council, Boy Scouts of America, The, 50 

Pleasant St. .... 

22 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden 1 . 

23 Young Women's Christian Association of Maiden, 54 

Washington St. 6 

Mansfield 

24 Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association l 

Mabblehead 

25 Marblehead Female Humane Socjety .... 

26 Marblehead Visiting Nurse Association .... 

27 Young Men's Christian Association of Marblehead, The . 

Mablboeotjoh 

28 Algonquin Council, Boy Scouts of America, Incorporated . 

29 Hillside School, Robin Hill Rd. « 

30 Marlborough Hospital, Union St. 1 

31 Marlborough Woman's Club 

32 Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society . . . . 



33 Nathaniel Taylor Fund Inc 

Matnabd 

34 Russian Educational Society of Maynard, Inc., The . 

Medford 

35 Fellsland Council Inc. Boy Scouts of America, 5 High St. . 

36 Lawrence Memorial Hospital of Medford, 170 Governors 

Ave. (69 beds) 

37 Medford Council Girl Scouts, Inc. . . 

38 Medford Home for Aged Men and Women, 203 High St. . 

39 Medford Unemployment and Relief Association, Inc., 60 

Salem St 

40 Medford Visiting Nurse Association, 107 Salem St. . 

41 Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children, The . 

42 Fitch Home, Inc., The, 75 Lake Ave 

43 Melrose Hospital Association, 585 Lebanon St. (87 beds) . 

44 Morgan and Dodge Home for Aged Women, The, 265 

Franklin St. 1 

Mendon 

45 Resthaven Association, Inc., The 

Methuen 

46 Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Temporary 

Home, The 

47 Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and Incurable . 



$1,200 
23,650 
17,683 
52,054 


$480 

3,234 

593 

11,413 


$219 

1,439 

47,693 


$499 
1,350 


470,913 


19,975 


42,550 


699 


32,883 
65,509 


1,000 
304 


- 


2,067 
3,110 


19,761 


451 


3,162 


- 


37,863 


726 


12,665 


243 


10,776 
300,004 
944,116 


564 
16,141 


2,099 
152,718 


318 

10,878 
10,929 


182,889 


1,488 


1,527 


4,232 


4,431 


1,086 


27 


120 


261,387 
2,102 


1,953 
257 


25,640 
175 


2,648 
156 



31,663 



23,706 



764 



6,305 
347,129 



114 



149 



1,195 
3,014 



614 



3,393 
16,668 



34 



99,746 
26,509 
70,683 


1,587 

928 

2.204 


949 

583 

2,278 


3,767 
1,168 
1,048 


18,123 
84,825 


6,513 
7,192 


3,771 
10,730 


275 
9 


1,815 
5,606 


839 
426 


1,216 
350 


6 

224 


7,241 


160 


202 


232 


14,079 


360 


82 


- 


7,739 


3,651 


1,146 


- 


592,154 

811 

205,001 


1,087 
2,901 


106,522 
4,782 
1,011 


15,633 
7,320 


44 
32,194 
184,583 


28 
1,198 
1,192 


6,661 


1,269 
7,441 


404,972 
481,197 


547 

2,428 


3,869 
110,405 


11,589 
7,329 



10 



7,583 



- None. 



1 No report. 



J Restricted to capital. 



3 Attendance. 



<Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



107 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service ok Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$1,0002 

500 

8 
11,193 2 


$480 
3,953 
3,882 

61,616 
8 

63,224 


$483 
4,199 
3,170 

62,990 
8 

64,103 


$60 

1,727 

264 

19,394 

28,756 


- 


3,067 
3,459 


1,799 
2,770 


2,357 


- 


3,622 


3,576 


1,286 


- 


13,635 


10,081 


3,389 


6,194 


318 

19,737 

181,924 


350 

13,648 

188,728 


5,271 
66,373 


6612 


7,364 


7,680 


4,618 


- 


1,234 


1,353 


375 


- 


30,242 
588 


29,026 
865 


14,319 
488 


- 


10,937 


9,767 


2,989 


- 


769 


1,557 


837 



594 



442 



4,797 



4,542 
24,000 51,324 



430 



4,565 



120 



2,306 



500 


122,926 
6,141 
11,732 


111,377 
5,917 
8,065 


55,099 
1,659 
2,961 


3,3502 


29 
9,129 
8,633 


120 
9,080 
8,697 


6,941 
7,400 


2502 1 
8,959 / 


16,005 


12,661 


4,708 


129,122 


122,274 


- 



186 



4,552 
34,640 



13,185 



5 

104 



15 
16,543 3 
137 
1,680 

3,8645 



2,592 
560 5 
14 



8,278' 
28 



2.3 



34 
102 



137 
127 



8,356 
1,000 


14,660 
3,682 
5,531 


5,344 
2,883 
7,677 


1,820 
1,760 
3,975 


1 


3 

1 
7 


16 

1,818' 
827 5 


11 

-4 

570 5 


4,903 


10,322 
22,835 


10,692 
19,221 


5,719 
5,596 


3 


13 
10 


1,918 
75 


6 


_ 


2,062 
1,002 


2,379 
1,005 


1,800 
81 


: 


3 


1,3527 


4977 



334 



430 



2 


28 


" 


~ 


5 


24 


~ 


- 


7 
68 


4 
26 

3,121 


4 
61 


- 


7 


352 


305 


10 


1 


75 


75 


30 


14 

2 


1,296 s 

_4 


-4 
_4 


- 



700 



60 



20 



Membership. 



6 Report for 5 months. 



' Visits. 



8 Report for 6 months. 



108 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



43 



MlDDLBBOROUGH 

Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc. 
Middleborough Relief Association Inc. 
Montgomery Home for Aged People 
St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborough (23 beds) 
Y. M. H. A. Camp Avoda Association, Inc. 
Young Men's Christian Association of Middleborough, 
The 1 

MlLFORD 

Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy (See 
also Springfield) 

Home for the Aged at Milford, The .... 

Milford-Hopedale-Mendon Instructive District Nursing 
Association 

Milford Hospital (45 beds) 

Young Men's Christian Association of Milford . . . 

MlLLBURY 

Millbury Society for District Nursing, The 

Milton 

Cunningham Foundation 

Fuller Trust, Inc r , The 

Milton Hospital and Convalescent Home (25 beds) . 
Milton Visiting Nurse and Social Service League 
Swift Charity . . . . . . ' . 



MONSON 

Monson Home for Aged People, Inc 

Montague 
Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, Massachu- 
setts, The (64 beds) 

Monterey 
William J. Gould Associates, Inc., The .... 

Nantucket 
Children's Aid Society of Nantucket . . . 

Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc 

Nantucket Cottage Hospital (19 beds) .... 
Old People's Home Association of Nantucket, The . 

Relief Association 

Union Benevolent Society, The 

Natjck 

Leonard Morse Hospital (43 beds) 

Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons .... 
Natick Visiting Nurse Association, The .... 
New England Deaconess Association (J. W. Wilbur Health 
Home) 



Needham 

31 King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc. 

32 Needham Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 



New Bedford 

Animal Rescue League of New Bedford, 38 Hillman St. . 

Association for the Relief of Aged Women 

College Club of New Bedford, Inc., The .... 

Hachnosath Orchim Charitable Association, 271 County 
St 

Hebrew Free Loan Society of New Bedford, Inc., 57 How- 
land St. . . _ . . 

Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society, New Bedford, Mass. 

Henryk Dabrowski Society, 146 Ashley Blvd. . 

Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees of the 

James Arnold Fund, Trustees of the .... 

Ladies City Mission Society in New Bedford, 755 South 
First St 

New Bedford & Fairhaven Council of the Boy Scouts of 
America Inc., 105 William St. 7 . . . 

New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association (operating 
Sassaquin Sanatorium), 4431 Acushnet Ave. 1 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society, 60 Eighth St. . 

New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. 

New Bedford Day Nursery, 1060 Cove Rd. 



$4,690 

91 

103,235 

119,660 

10,402 



731 
15,317 

32,832 
573,899 



1,150 



136,523 



106,965 
3,870 



264,113 

19,791 

141,582 



$19 



1,513 



7,286 
500 



1,234 



513 



241,008 


81 


81,376 


8,626 


6,010 

35,058 

207,402 

80,004 

45,970 

6,896 


19 

644 

11,406 

1,419 

132 


392,903 

129,575 
2,275 


600 
665 


18,000 


4,444 


1,017 


59 


185,554 

608,010 

3,444 


1,482 
99 

672 


196 


810 


230 

2,516 

5,125 

60,736 

113,210 


577 

1,210 

214 



5,071 
6,739 



6,292 

124 

1,095 



$295 



14,222 
9,955 



104 



6,473 
70,339 



1,613 



500 

42,533 
8,154 



19,153 
714 



44,386 

973 

2,331 

1,570 



76 



1,879 

773 

1,787 



202 

1,321 

362 



561 



$5,534 
6,477 



485 
16,703 



12 



283,646 


29,130 


3,633 


- 


1,246,239 


35 


176 


72,787 


222,909 


4,325 


23,010 


9,812 


1,779 


5,826 


4,065 


76 


66,953 


- 


- 


3,358 



5,538 



1,005 
3,744 
1,665 
1,881 
182 



36,076 

4,541 

55 



48 



31 



6,730 
29,544 



43 

2,723 
4,719 



5,919 10,789 

209 930 

1.690 5,099 



None. 



No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



3 Visits. 



* Membership. 



5 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



109 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$68 > 



10,800* 



600 2 
5002 



10,720 



,500 



$315 



1,003 
485 



13,759 
87,543 



2,859 

32,763 

72,998 

37,682 

9,969 

3,358 

6,552 

45,115 
13,967 



80,463 
6,114 
3,052 

6,071 

167 



16,953 
41,137 
2,542 

810 

780 
2,531 

619 
2,723 
4,719 

17,021 

6,740 



13,050 36,050 

600 1,864 

6,700 2 7,885 



$234 



6,261 


6,014 


$2,270 


52,213 


22,707 


11,108 


9,955 


7,502 


2,102 



2,378 



11,597 
63,400 



2,631 



37,530 
18,202 
36,543 
11,022 
2,832 



4,673 

45,140 
19,003 



- 


319 


416 


- 


1,649 


1,878 


- 


34,395 


34,703 


3,376 


7,246 


4,289 


3,200 


5,213 


3,243 


- 


182 


440 



78,148 
7,584 
2,511 

7,526 



14,327 

37,397 

1,909 

803 

645 
2,249 

841 
2,629 
5,288 

8,438 

5,478 



9,070 
21,901 



1,395 



23,836 

13,247 

20,451 

7,037 



16,339 
4,285 



17,794 

1,772 

100 

45 



37,521 
2,744 
2,128 

1,784 



7,396 



387 

6,554 
2,625 

12,539 



29,533 
1,474 
8,742 5,119 



10 
537 



905 



4,011 
2,321 



2,2933 



905 
3,137 



7203 



8 


362* 


_5 


8 


12 


9 


6 


1,111 


175 


5 


9,8233 


3,4213 


- 


18 


18 



561 



238 



41 


1,260 


34 


- 


- 


6 


272 


78 


- 


- 


1 


3 

_5 


3 

_5 


3 


1 


19 
3 

3 


560 

5 

20 


120 

1 

20 


35 


" 


51 
4 
3 


1,354 

14 

591 


78 
68 


50 


- 


4 


43 


10 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


14 


5 


6,197 s 

65 

4 


5,8276 
65 
1 


- 


- 


- 


520 


520 


1 


- 


2 


37 

30 
14 


37 

30 
14 


50 


5 

1 

6 


6 


3,640 


2,420 


- 


7 


2 


1,285* 


1,285* 


- 


- 


10 


213 

_5 


163 

_5 


_i 


4 


8 


151 


73 


88 





8 Animals. 



7 Name changed to Cachalot Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America. 



110 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



27 



30 



32 



New Bedford— Con. 

New Bedford Dorcas Society 

New Bedford Family Welfare Society, 60 Eighth St. » 

New Bedford Girl Scouts Inc., 12 Market St. . 

New Bedford Home for Aged, 396 West Middle St. . 

New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association, The, 60 
Eighth St 

New Bedford Men's Mission, Inc., 151 North Second St. . 

New Bedford Port Society, 15 Johnny Cake Hill 

New Bedford Port Society, Ladies Branch 

New Bedford Young Men's Christian Association, The, 147 
William St . . 

New Bedford Young Women's Christian Association, 66 
Spring St. 

North End Guild of New Bedford, Tallman St. 

Portuguese Relief Association, Inc 

Sacred Heart Home, 359 Summer St. . . . . 

Saint Luke's Hospital of New Bedford, 95 Page St. (270 
beds) ......... 

Saint Mary's Home of New Bedford, 593 Kempton St. 

Union for Good Works, 12 Market St 

Welfare Federation of New Bedford, 60 Eighth St. . 

Winfred Goff Homoeopathic Hospital, The (not in opera- 
tion) 

Newburyport 
Anna Jaques Hospital, Highland Ave. (51 beds) 
Community Welfare Service of Newburyport, Inc., The, 2 

Harris St 

General Charitable Society of Newburyport 
Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newburyport Fire De- 
partment, The, Central Fire Station .... 
Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport, The 

Merrimack Humane Society, The 

Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newburyport, The, 2 

Harris St 

Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 2 Harris St. . 

Newburyport Bethel Society 

Newburyport Female Charitable Society, The . 
Newburyport Homeopathic Hospital, The, 277 High St. (25 

beds) 

Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Men, 361 High 

St 

Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Women, 75 

High St 

Newburyport Young Men's Christian Association, 98 State 

St 

Young Women's Christian Association of Newburyport, 13 

Market St 



$22,401 



New Marlborough 

34 Smith Park Young Men's Christian Association 

Newton 

35 All Newton Music School, Incorporated 

36 AH Souls Lend A Hand Club, Inc 

37 Baptist Home of Massachusetts, The, 66 Commonwealth 

Ave. 

38 Boys Welfare League Inc. ...... 

39 Charles D. Meserve Fund, Inc 

40 Governor John A. Andrew Home Association, 92 Washing- 

ton Park, Newtonville 

41 Lamson Home, The 

42 Lasell Alumnae, Inc 

43 Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolu- 

tion, 2349 Washington St., Newton Lower Falls . 

44 Mayor's Relief Committee Inc., 93 Union St., Newton 

Centre 

45 Mothers' Rest Association of the City of Newton, Incor- 

porated, The, 26 Oak Hill St., Newton Centre 

46 New England Peabody Home for Crippled Children, The, 

474 Brookline St., Newton Centre .... 

47 Newton Centre Woman's Club, Inc., The, 1280 Centre St., 

Newton Centre 

48 Newton Circle, Incorporated, The 

49 Newton Community Chest, Incorporated, 93 Union St., 

Newton Centre 



4,463 
110,027 


$2,525 
13 


$3,676 
459 


98 
2,500 


38,104 
21,299 
133,400 
77,276 


5,254 

1,894 

86 

26 


10,808 

3,228 

1 

18 


1,847 

4,114 
2,097 


170,810 


9,543 


14,970 


2,068 


429,595 

19,082 

22 

294,262 


13,132 

869 

82 

2,450 


37,548 

74 
42,685 


2,733 

1,018 

2 


3,506,365 

223,207 

197,509 

1,543 


39,169 
5,163 
2,535 

13,310 


291,811 

6,687 

466 

426 


82,442 
4,171 
6,934 


13,833 


- 


- 


102 


746,546 


2,523 


51,387 


26,503 


5,031 
63,163 


1,378 
50 


619 


2,679 
6,271 


7,992 

124 

17,549 


75 
114 


244 


287 
654 


118,617 

22,192 

3,912 

154 


5,147 

327 

16 


85 
1,071 


2,615 
147 
124 


60,105 


399 


26,303 


2,686 


168,507 


- 


906 


10,092 


309,672 


223 


405 


16,405 


125,371 


2,520 


4,238 


3,543 


107,117 


118 


4,221 


9,825 



65,000 

104 

19,783 

992,353 
1,200 
7,297 

9,509 
8,494 
9,846 

8,792 

223 

41,803 

1,010,431 

76,610 

2,688 

89,740 



3,700 
2,600 



1,360 

530 

1,171 

23,486 

2,893 

2,711 

3,685 
2,176 

144,554 



3,000 



3,890 
1,591 



1,719 



2,785 



18 

896 

2,428 

6,250 
1,775 



1 
690 

33,129 

403 

15 
389 
321 

32 



31 
39,949 



3,148 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Ill 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 





Average 


Service or Relief Given 














Number 


Number 






Families 




of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 


Officers 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 




ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





$896 



$914 



200 



200 



- 


6,300 
2,972 


7,212 
2,595 


$1,752 
684 


- 


2 
3 


_2 

8 


_2 

4 


- 


$7,300 

6,700 

6,700 
/ 500» \ 
I 563 J 


25,210 
5,130 

10,902 
8,841 

27,145 


19,951 
4,619 
4,540 
2,338 

28,387 


17,600 

1,896 

1,650 

150 

16,624 


- 


13 

4 
2 

1 

11 


3,469 

4,459 

169 

11 

1.313* 


1,180 

2,835 

81 

11 


5 


13,000 
2,700 


66,414 

4,588 

159 

45,788 


56,959 

1,990 

293 

25,370 


23,658 
1,296 

4,838 


- 


35 
3 

27 


2,000 

_2 
_2 

218 


_2 

_2 

31 


~ 


650 
2,7003 


404,923 
16,672 
9,936 
13,737 


430,367 
16,913 
10,972 
12,065 


200,146 
3,040 

3,019 


1 
1 


330 

1 


12,950 
145 
184 


636 
105 
184 


79 


- 


102 


53 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,3003 


80,414 


83,639 


32,783 


- 


55 


1,639 


197 


- 


- 


4,677 
6,321 


4,550 
5,102 


1,984 
200 


1 


I 


987 


_2 


329 

58 


491 


854 
359 
654 


1,370 
319 
591 


70 


3 


- 


19 
6 


19 
6 


3 


- 


5,233 

4,013 

163 

124 


4,993 

3,703 

219 

108 


1,704 


" 


Z 


1,928 

102 

4 


1,189 

102 

4 


40 
3 


- 


29,417 


29,122 


8,990 


- 


11 


315 


- 


- 


5003 


11,029 


8,124 


3,408 


3 


5 


17 


- 


- 


2,000 


18,884 


13,626 


5,568 


1 


5 


56 


37 


- 


- 


10,364 


10,281 


5,370 


- 


10 


439 ^ 


89 4 


- 


- 


14,165 


9,868 


3,839 


1 


7 


385* 


67* 


- 


- 


3,630 


3,903 


1,357 


- 


13 


107 


20 


- 


250 


7,842 
4,857 


8,284 
4,241 


7,719 


_ 


20 


187 


19 


33 


14,1123 


42,117 


43,671 


10,585 


1 


13 


54 


- 


- 


- 


403 


400 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


_ 


4,160 

389 

1,021 


4,250 
389 
456 


1,749 
50 


1 


5 


7 
2 


2 


- 


- 


1,919 


1,586 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23,504 


23,321 


6,202 


1 


1 


-2 


_2 


- 


1,0003 


3,820 


3,546 


1,250 


- 


8 


331 


331 




8,364 


53,453 


89,276 


36,661 


- 


45 


105 


54 


- 


- 


10,008 
4,013 


8,923 
4,177 


1,828 
1,078 


- 


3 


1 
323 


1 
283 


95 


- 


147,707 


165,882 


3,559 


- 


1 


- 


- 




1 Restricted to capital. 








* Membership. 







14 



112 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Newton — Con. 

1 Newton District Nursing Association, 297 Walnut St., 

Newtonville 

2 Newton Hospital, 2014 Washington St., Newton Lower 

Falls (187 beds) , .... 

3 Newton Hospital Aid Association, The .... 

4 Newton Local Council, Girl Scouts, Inc., 297 Walnut St. . 

5 Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc., 12 Austin St., Newtonville . 

6 Newton Young Men's Christian Association, The, 276 

Church St. 

7 Norumbega Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 259 Wal- 

nut St., Newtonville 

8 Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan Girls, Cor- 

poration of the, 24 Hovey St 

9 Senoj Lodge Associates, Inc 

10 Stearns School Center 

11 Stone Institute and Newton Home for Aged People, 277 

Elliot St., Newton Upper Falls .... 

12 Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston, The, 206 

Waltham St., West Newton 

13 Walker Missionary Homes, Inc., 144 Hancock St., Auburn- 

dale 

14 West Newton Community Centre, Incorporated, 492 Wal- 

tham St., West Newton 

15 Working Boys' Home, 601 Winchester St., Newton High- 

lands 

16 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Newton 1 

North Adams 

17 North Adams Hospital, The, Hospital Ave. (76 beds) 

18 Venerini Sisters, Inc., 74 Marshall St 

19 Young Men's Christian Association of North Adams, Mass., 

The, 34 Summer St. l 

Northampton 

20 Children's Aid Association of Hampshire County, 16 Cen- 

ter St. . 

21 Clarke School for the Deaf, The, 46 Round Hill 

22 Cooley Dickinson Hospital, The, 30 Locust St. (132 beds) 

23 Father Matthew Total Abstinence and Benevolent Society 

of Florence, 47 Pine St 

24 Hampshire County Public Health Association, Inc., 240 

Main St. 

25 Hampshire-Franklin Council, Incorporated, Boy Scouts of 

America, 38 Gothic St. 5 . . . . 

26 Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women in North- 

ampton, 215 South St. . 

27 Northampton Visiting Nursing Association, Inc., 240 Main 

St.i 

28 Smith Students' Aid Society, Incorporated 

29 Wright Home for Young Women, The, 96 Bridge St. 

30 Young Men's Christian Association of Northampton, 

Massachusetts, The, 29 Bang St 

North Andover 

31 Charlotte Home, The 

North Attleborough 

32 North Attleborough District Nursing Association 

Northbridge 

33 George Marston Whitin Gymnasium Inc. 

34 Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The (15 beds) 

Northfield 

35 Northfield Seminary Students Aid Society x 

Norton 

36 Barrowsville Community Service Corporation, The . 

37 Newcomb Home for Old Ladies of Norton, Massachusetts, 

The 

NORWELL 

38 Norwell Visiting Nurse Association, Inc 

- None. » No report. 2 Restricted to capital. 



$6,591 


$10,594 


$6,204 


$324 


412,314 

2,131 

28,850 

24,813 


66,659 
1,551 
6,100 

25,219 


274,992 

2,759 

3,605 

810 


21,225 

28 

72 

1,163 


309,221 


11,070 


41,242 


4,472 


40,902 


9,438 


1,241 


- 


71,457 
2,373 


2,345 

359 

2,900 


338 
571 


2,768 
83 


598,020 


5,421 


1,000 


22,212 


141,303 


587 


10,664 


4,295 


217,800 


9,370 


7,986 


4,618 


6,606 


2,885 


351 


- 


212,531 


25,026 


11,798 


85 


465,878 
26,206 


13,303 
3,483 


57,270 
6,373 


10,263 



45,176 

2,431,735 

760,408 


6,161 
65,928 
20,059 


3,151 
137,790 
116,210 


1,318 

66,722 

7,947 


5,009 ' 


45 


286 


- 


7,190 


4,950 


323 


102 


5,959 


12,591 


6,860 


34 


349,485 


- 


9,300 


10,672 


87,111 
292,049 


2,818 


7,918 


5,063 
10,708 


69,136 


4,571 


6,760 


677 


75,161 


- 


- 


2,487 


7,396 


2,300 


223 


243 


215,236 
77,042 


5,000 
1,122 


317 
8,383 


3,681 



2,566 
296,143 

642 



1 
14,019 



249 



1,019 



a Not stated. 



Membership. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



113 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 





$17,123 


$16,459 


$11,319 




7 


1,125 


482 






! 


$44,682 * 


361,276 

4,338 

9,777 

27,193 


363,916 

3,967 

8,657 

27,302 


182,449 

725 
4,298 
8,736 


- 


220 

1 
4 
7 


8,520 

-3 


3,564 

_3 


442 


1 


2 
3 
4 
5 


200 2 


56,785 


56,676 


15,453 


- 


13 


2,800 


1,000 


30 


30 


6 


- 


10,679 


10,699 


4,800 


1 


4 


1,349 « 


- 


- 


- 


7 


~ 


5,451 

930 

2,984 


5,134 
1,040 
2,979 


2,424 

106 

1,956 


: 


4 
2 
2 


14 

48 

400 


12 
2 

_3 


275 


13 


8 
9 
10 


7,7372 


27,633 


20,200 


7,254 


- 


9 


30 


- 


- 


- 


11 


1,025 


16,573 


9,106 


2,08,0 


- 


3 


26 


- 


31 


- 


12 


15,0002 


15,706 


15,531 


5,548 


- 


9 


231 


~ 


- 


- 


13 


- 


3,236 


3,285 


2,120 


- 


10 


537 


119 


- 


- 


14 


31,793 


68,704 


51,581 


7,570 


- 


17 


179 


39 


- 


- 


15 
16 


- 


83,565 
9,856 


78,414 
8,190 


35,435 
17 


2 


62 
1 


1,849 
200 


283 


28 


: 


17 
18 

19 


1,600 
2,529 2 


12,231 
204,512 
144,217 


12,214 
201,135 
188,900 


4,874 
107,769 
52,941 


- 


4 
82 
112 


232 

155 

4,097 


184 

3 

31 


127 


23 


20 
21 

22 


- 


332 


377 


50 


- 


1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


23 


- 


5,376 


5,312 


1,872 


1 


- 


489 


477 


- 


- 


24 


- 


19,486 


15,561 


3,841 


- 


2 


1,515 * 


_3 


- 


- 


25 


1,250 3 


20,203 


18,714 


7,990 


- 


8 


38 


2 


- 


- 


26 


_ 


15,800 
10,708 


16,814 
10,050 


3,500 


I 


6 


70 
20 


_3 

20 


- 


- 


27 
28 
29 


- 


12,073 


9,877 


5,719 


- 


5 


4,400 


1,185 


- 


23 


30 


- 


2,487 


1,348 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


31 


- 


2,980 


3,534 


2,925 


- 


2 


510 


376 


308 


- 


32 


- 


5,317 
13,454 


6,334 
15,389 


6,915 


- 


10 


685 


: 


- 


1 


33 
34 

35 


- - 


1 
14,869 


10,871 


4,989 


_ 


4 


7 


_ 


- 


- 


36 
37 


- 


1,286 


1,078 


417 


- 


1 


203 


65 


73 


- 


38 



6 Report for 10 months. 



114 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Norwood 

1 Lewis and Anna M. Day Home for Aged in Norwood, Inc. $108,778 

2 Norwood Civic Association 175,773 

3 Norwood Hospital (80 beds) 457,376 

Oak Bluffs 

4 Marthas Vineyard Hospital, Inc. (26 beds) . . . 166,913 

Orange 

5 Orange Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The .... 299 

Oxford 

6 Oxford Home for Aged People 74,976 

Palmer 

7 Wing Memorial Hospital Association (23 beds) . . 38,112 

Peabodt 

8 Charles B. Haven Home for Aged Men in Peabody, 109 

Lowell St 84,492 

9 Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers . . . 28,443 

10 Hebrew Ladies Gemilath Chessad of Peabody, Massa- 

chusetts 119 

11 Isaac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy Children . 33,549 

12 Ladies Auxiliary of the Congregation Anshe Sfard of Pea- 

body, Massachusetts, 4 Little's Lane .... 300 

13 Lanis Hatzedek of Peabody, Incorporated . . . 407 

14 Peabody Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, 23 Main St. . 202 

15 Peabody Visiting Nurse Association .... 2,098 

16 Sutton Home for Aged Women in Peabody, 7 Sewall St. 1 . 

Pepperell 

17 Pepperell District Nurse Association, Idc. . . . 621 

18 Petersham Exchange, The 3,143 

Pittsfield 

19 Associated Charities of Pittsfield, The, 33 Pearl St. . . 41,194 

20 Berkshire Benevolent Association for the Blind, Inc., The, 

30 Eagle St . . 1,700 . 

21 Berkshire Branch of the Woman's Board of Missions in Bos- 

ton 3,408 

22 Berkshire County Home for Aged Women, 89 South St. 

(See also Lenox) 460,305 

23 Berkshire County Society for the Care of Crippled and De- 

formed Children, The, 472 West St 408,787 

24 Berkshire County Tuberculosis Association, Inc., 16 South 

St 752 

25 Boys' Club of Pittsfield, 16 Melville St 569,052 

26 Epworth Mission of Pittsfield, Mass., Robbins Ave. . . 17,938 

27 Hillerest Hospital, 798 North St. (42 beds) . . . 97,673 

28 House of Mercy, 741 North St. (194 beds) . . . 1,235,059 

29 Junior League of Pittsfield, Inc., 44 West St. . . . 1,129 

30 Kiwanis Health Camp of Pittsfield, Inc., East New Lenox 

Rd 5,254 

31 Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Lebanon Ave. . 125,280 

32 Pittsfield Day Nursery Association, 141 Francis Ave. 13,000 

33 St. Luke's Hospital of Pittsfield, Massachusetts Inc., 379 

East St. (127 beds) 405,492 

34 Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfield, Mass., 33 Pearl St. 22,518 

Plymouth 

35 Boys' Club of Plymouth, The 32,655 

36 Chiltonville Community Club, Inc 283 

37 Jordan Hospital, The (44 beds) 347,617 

38 Long Pond Ladies Aid Society 2,069 

39 Plymouth Community Nurse Association, Incorporated . 2,791 

40 Plymouth Fragment Society 46,569 

41 Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of the . 100,506 

42 Sunnyside, Inc 4,500 

Princeton 

43 Girl's Vacation House Association, The .... 37,448 

Provincetown 

44 Provincetown Helping Hand Society .... 60,209 

- None. » No report. 2 Restricted to capital. 8 Not stated. * Visits. 



$6,829 


$600 
117,504 


$4,129 

13 

3,931 


7,036 


26,772 


450 


1,873 


835 


4 


2 


- 


3,419 


447 


30,497 


425 


100 
686 


20 


1,747 
434 


70 


226 


1,767 


100 

86 

1,015 

440 


200 
249 

2,372 


10 


701 


973 


- 


353 


1,258 


4 


19,721 


142 


1,083 


736 


- 


71 


4,881 


- 


100 


2,575 


7,212 


16,652 


6,108 


3,570 


15,791 


7,036 

10,086 

305 

35 


300 
6,680 

49,214 


12,435 

77 

943 


12,960 
608 


201,835 
1,191 


28,429 
36 


1,446 
4,587 
3,960 


6,208 
431 


17 

3,330 

105 


18,627 
8,634 


90,707 
5,371 


846 


1,518 
53 
8,052 
152 
724 
76 
106 
1,605 


22 

490 

42,279 

300 

1,616 

797 


986 

6,910 

81 
1,974 
3,897 


714 


945 


1,099 


_ 


_ 


2,556 



5 Membership. 



Pt. II. 



115 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 


















Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 

. Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 




$96,385 2 


$4,129 

613 

128,385 


$637 

30 

122,356 


$300 
54,520 


1 
1 


83 


3,594 


63 


- 


- 


1 

2 
3 


- 


34,258 


29,610 


11,785 


- 


32 


361 


1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


2,713 


2,674 


2,180 


- 


1 


286 


59 


185 


- 


5 


- 


3,421 


1,092 


100 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


31,371 


28,422 


13,811 


1 


13 


872 


12 


- 


- 


7 


100 


1,847 
1,240 


2,137 
1,305 


591 
50 


1 


2 


4 
20 


20 


- 


- 


8 
9 


- 


296 
1,767 


945 
694 


110 


1 


1 


28 


_3 


- 


- 


10 
11 


- 


300 

345 

1,015 

2,813 


150 
210 
987 

2,958 


2,563 


- 


2 


3 

449 


3 
109 


57 


1 


12 
13 
14 
15 
16 


- 


1,675 


1,230 


921 


- 


2 


2,309^ 


323 4 


- 


- 


17 


- 


1,616 


1,494 


182 


- 


4 


48 


48 


- 


- 


18 


- 


20,947 


20,703 


5,695 


- 


3 


- 


- 


715 


1 


19 


- 


808 


784 


- 


- 


- 


55 


55 


- 


- 


20 


- 


4,981 


5,041 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


21 


19,075 


46,183 


21,432 


8,585 


- 


8 


29 


- 


- 


- 


22 


500 


25,969 


25,772 


13,221 


1 


14 


30 


22 


- 


- 


23 


41,300 2 

/ 48,9522 
I 3,614 


7,337 

29,202 

383 

50,193 

/ 246,839 
1,836 


7,304 

29,889 

361 

52,020 

251,023 
1,597 


2,380 

17,473 

83 

16,935 

95,885 
786 


1 


1 
32 

1 
44 

158 
1 


87 
2,727 5 

_3 

3,217 

10,467 
328 


87 

_3 

45 

_3 


58 

_3 


3 


24 
25 
26 

27 

28 
29 


- 


1,464 
14,126 
4,497 


1,732 
13,647 
4,545 


572 
6,612 
2,824 


: 


5 

9 
3 


52 

26 

4,752 


52 

2 

352 


7 


: 


30 
31 

32 


- 


109,334 
14,680 


109,264 
15,177 


31,831 
12,121 


- 


79 
10 


3,148 
2,465 * 


129 
1,1394 


- 


: 


33 
34 


1,545 2 
533 


2,526 

544 

57,295 

452 

3,422 

2,050 

5,333 

1,605 


2,493 

460 

52,550 

319 

3,561 

2,003 

3,294 

1,605 


986 

67 

26,155 

2,343 

840 
633 


- 


1 

1 

32 

3 

1 
3 


412 

1,300 

2,906^ 
17 
6 
16 


43 

40 

1,2924 
17 

16 


578 
118 


3 
15 


35 
36 

37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 


- 


2,759 


2,400 


1,053 


- 


7 


81 


12 


- 


- 


43 


- 


2,657 


2,241 


- 


- 


- 


90 


90 


49 


4 


44 



116 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Quincy 

Atlantic Women's Club, Inc., The 

City Hospital of Quincy (Income paid to City of Quincy 

for hospital purposes) 

Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Massachusetts, The, 

1359 Hancock St 

Knights of Columbus Civic Institute of Quincy, Mass., 25 

Foster St. 

Quincy Council Girl Scouts, Inc 

Quincy Council Inc. of the Boy Scouts of America, 1135 

Hancock St 

Quincy Day Nursery Association 

Quincy Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 1245 Hancock St. 

Quincy Women's Club, 148 President's Lane . 
Sailors Snug Harbor, of Boston, Palmer St. 
William B. Rice Eventide Home, 215 Adams St. 
Wollaston Woman's Club, 22 Beale St. . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy, Mass., The, 
61 Washington St 



Randolph 

Boston School for the Deaf 

Seth Mann, 2d, Home for Aged and Infirm Women, The 



Reading 

16 Reading Home for Aged Women . 

17 Reading Visiting Nurse Association 



Reveke 

18 Beachmont Catholic Club, 714 Winthrop Ave. 

19 Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association of Revere 

20 Ingleside Corporation, The, 148 Prospect Ave. . 

21 Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc 

Rockland 

22 French Home for Aged Women, The x 

Rutland 

23 Central New England Sanatorium, Incorporated (100 beds) 

24 Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc. . . 

25 Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational Association 

Salem 

26 Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute Women, 

in Salem, 180 Derby St. . . . 

27 Bertram Home for Aged Men, 29 Washington Sq. 

28 Children's Island Sanitarium, The, Lowell Island l . 

29 Family Welfare Society of Salem, 126 Washington St. 

30 House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association, The, 

54 Turner St. . 

31 Lydia E. Pinkham Memorial, Incorporated, The, 250 

Derby St 

32 Mack Industrial School 

33 Marine Society at Salem in New England, 18 Washington 

Sq 

34 North Shore Babies Hospital, The, 49 Dearborn St. (50 

beds) 

35 North Shore Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 246 Y?, 

Essex St 

36 Plummer Farm School of Reform for Boys, Winter Island . 

37 Salem Animal Rescue League, 10^ Foster St. 

38 Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, 5 St. 

Peter St. . . •.-... 

39 Salem Charitable Mechanic Association .... 

40 Salem East India Marine Society, Trustees of the, 161 Es- 

sex St 

41 Salem Female Charitable Society, The .... 

42 Salem Fraternity, 11 Central St 

43 Salem Hebrew Ladies Aid Society 1 .... 

44 Salem Hospital, 81 Highland Ave. (156 beds) . 

45 Salem Relief Committee (Inc.), 250 Derby St. . 

46 Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Friend Society, 7 

Carpenter St 

47 Salem Young Men's Christian Association, 288 Essex St. . 

48 Salem Young Women's Association, The, 18 Brown St. 

49 Samaritan Society . . ... 

50 Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association 



$1,781 


$63 


$63 


$53 


121,642 


- 


- 


5,753 


12,917 


6,230 


- 


350 


8,000 
12,373 


1,161 
415 


614 


- 


25,289 
4,229 
3,141 


4,621 

23 

2,297 


111 
5,598 


169 
66 


37,017 
355,661 
485,564 

15,254 


2,032 

500 

18,105 

1,798 


1,777 

2,177 

500 

1,057 


91 
14,137 
20,853 

44 


143,413 


10,052 


15,548 


775 


541,916 
237,508 


202 

284 


101,307 


121 

7,889 


58,137 
6,473 


437 
1,027 


972 
1,523 


1,995 


4,000 

60 

138,080 

4,146 


352 

204 

833 

1,477 


837 

447 
2,393 
5,288 


42 



339,162 
2,729 
3,058 



449,209 
437,179 

37,613 

30,054 

115,116 
77,053 

145,020 

196,572 

4,208 

174,387 

18,346 

17,631 
1,888 

49,921 
44,505 
192,196 

1,517,774 
11,127 

244,537 

305,479 

54,866 

67,907 

124,344 



20,901 
299 
300 



180 

5,388 
2,113 



14,860 

2,077 

326 

5,855 



111 
301 

3,733 
1,438 

30 

12,194 

455 

197 



54,629 



2,000 

3,034 
8,687 

50 

6,167 

1,325 

3,509 

155 



769 

193,760 
256 

2,794 

7,559 

2,558 

118 



68 
168 



13,638 
12,756 

1,696 

1,575 

6,185 
2,981 

6,517 

5,976 



6,526 
570 



1,817 
2,561 
5,934 

26,550 
552 

9,160 
6,985 
1,517 
1,441 
6,019 



None. 



1 No report. 2 Membership. 3 Not stated. 4 Restricted to capital. 6 Visits. 6 Animals. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



117 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



- 


$179 


$230 


- 


- 


5,753 


5,634 


$600 


- 


5,252 


4,993 


2,564 


- 


1,161 
1,030 


1,177 
1,146 


780 


$1,000 *\ 
221 J 

1,000 


4,733 
192 

8,183 
3,898 
16,814 
22,958 
2,900 


4,587 
172 

9,128 
4,004 
13,660 
18,059 
2,656 


2,677 

7,314 

422 
3,421 
2,325 


704 


27,080 


29,019 


13,004 


- 


101,631 
7,889 


78,316 
7,509 


42,049 
3,756 


5,290 
1,782 


8,695 
4,370 


5,368 
2,398 


1,411 
• 2,072 


1,564 
930 


1,190 

651 

5,029 

7,738 


1,556 

766 
10,725 
5,934 


110 

5,205 
4,657 



197 



2,444 5 



- 


40 


40 


5 


25 


12 


3 


8,1325 


2,463 



^ 


75,599 
299 
468 


86,091 
539 
446 


33,918 


2 


35 


82 
300 


15 
300 


2,428 « 


15,818 
12,756 


22,324 
11,915 


9,790 
4,568 


1 

1 


9 
6 


31 
25 


25 


390 


10,509 


10,901 


5,551 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


12,392 


10,191 


7,092 


- 


7 


600 


- 


250 


6,185 
3,282 


5,279 
3,525 


4,103 
75 


I 


5 


2,860 
13 


2,860 
13 


- 


6,517 


4,433 


625 


2 


- 


16 


16 


9,058* 


27,004 


31,736 


12,865 


- 


22 


448 


199 


2,550 
5,755 


3,402 
12,586 
6,807 


3,438 
10,441 
2,151 


960 

4,842 
990 


1 


1 

7 
1 


1,960 2 

38 

1,4066 


26 

_ 


2,555* 


5,685 
68 


6,026 
25 


3,376 


- 


9 


419 


419 


2,300 « 
5,0004 


1,817 
2,672 
7,030 


2,076 
2,581 
8,233 


400 
4,724 


2 


2 


8 

70 
5,000 


8 

70 

_ 


!4,051< 


224,019 
2,247 


224,971 
2,606 


102,218 
1,720 


- 


198 

2 


8,213 


3,715 


2,700 

2,700 

944 


14,684 
29,670 
5,475 
1,747 
6,019 


16,458 
23,863 
2,988 
1,774 
6,019 


6,449 
9,201 
1,429 

300 


1 
1 


8 
8 
3 


36 

1,0322 

98 

53 

27 


7 

_; 

3 
53 
27 



271 



146 



2 


- 


- 


728 


- 


1 


3 


3 


31 


3 


- 


443 2 


_3 


- 


- 


2 


1.418 2 


_3 


- 


3 


6 


11,577 s 


5,957 s 


_ 


_ 


2 


6 


6 


- 


5 


5 


29 


27 


- 


- 


3 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 


75 


21 


28 


8 


1,755 2 


- 


- 


31 



US 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Salem — Con. 
Woman's Friend Society, 12 Hawthorne Boulevard 

Sandwich 
Sandwich Health Association, Incorporated 

Saugus 
Saugus Visiting Nurse Association . 
Women's Civic League of Cliftondale, Inc., The 

Scituate 
Arwile Inc. ... ... 

Children's Sunlight Hospital (70 beds) . 
Lydia Collett Corporation, The 



8 Sharon Civic Foundation, The . . . . 

9 Sharon Sanatorium, The (50 beds) . . . . 

Sherborn 

10 Sherborn Widows' and Orphans' Benevolent Society, The . 

11 Altrurian Club of Shirley, The 

Somerville 

12 Associated Charities of Somerville, 261 Pearl St. 

13 Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Women 

14 Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The, 186 High- 

land Ave. (See also Boston) 

15 Somerville Home for the Aged. 117 Summer St. 

16 Somerville Hospital, 36 Crocker St. (86 beds) . 

17 Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association, The * . 

18 Somerville Rotary Educational Fund, Inc. 

19 Somerville Young Men's Christian Association, 101 High- 

land Ave. . . 

20 Visiting Nursing Association of Somerville, Massachusetts, 

85 Central St 

21 Washington Street Day Nursery of Somerville . 

SOUTHBOROUGH 

22 Waucho Beneficent Corporation 

SOUTHBRIDGE 

23 Harrington Hospital Corporation (34 beds) 

24 Young Men's Christian Association of Southbridge . 

Spencer 

25 Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse Association . 



Springfield 

American International College, 963 State St. . 

Baby Feeding Association of Springfield, The, 83 State St. . 

Catholic Woman's Club of Springfield, The, 27 Bowdoin St. 

Community Chest of Springfield, Massachusetts, Inc., 83 
State St 

Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy, 18 
Margaret St. (See also Milford) ..... 

Daughters of Jacob Free Loan Association, 841 Dwight St. 

Daughters of Zion Old Peoples Home, 67 Massasoit St. 

Doane Orphanage Trust Foundation .... 

Dunbar Community League, Inc., 643 Union St. 

Family Welfare Association of Springfield, 83 State St. 

Good Shepherd Association of Springfield, Mass., The, 584 
WilbrahamRd 

Good Will, Inc., The 

Hampden Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc., 83 State 
St 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association, 83 State St. 

Hampden County Tuberculosis and Public Health Asso- 
ciation, 145 State St 

Hampton Club, Inc. of Springfield, Mass. 

Horace Smith Fund, The .... 

James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of the x . . 

Jewish Social Service Bureau, Inc., 1862 Main St. 

Junior Achievement, Incorporated, 33 Pearl St. 

Legal Aid Society of Springfield, Massachusetts, Inc. 
104 State St 



$103,537 
1,024 



873 
3,910 



2,500 
99,031 
5,854 



502,633 



15,992 



3,041 



69,081 



69,044 
655,067 
330,355 



212,131 

6,230 
6,526 



72 



$2,830 

752 

880 

192 



11,021 
207 



940 
3,466 



8 

175 

3,027 

1,916 
792 

425 

13,855 

346 



$9,341 



327 



1,098 



135 
23,514 



264 

180 

11,115 

1,383 

115,805 

400 

8,045 

1,239 



$3,580 

32 

3 
75 



623 
5 



1 

18,712 



660 



3,575 

155 

22,655 
4,766 

10 

152 

133 
213 



The, 



284,359 
79,797 


15,677 
7,183 


38,464 
9,487 


525 

25 


30,014 


43 


580 


1,097 


312,065 


18,329 


102,543 


3,969 


5,121 


1,629 


1,683 


129 


62,148 


296,908 


- 


602 


713 
15,535 
13,536 
61,507 
259,084 
90,606 


1,372 

390 

1,473 

5,486 
39,779 


248 

8,448 

1,011 

75 

20,769 

1,389 


1,982 
3,412 
3,884 


157,192 


13,376 


36,960 


60 


34,395 
128,864 


12,453 
11,732 


5,996 
15,851 


5,608 


45,752 

2,085 

365,305 


23,467 
167 


1,060 

194 

4,805 


23 
73 

16,675 


47 
98,148 


8,209 
2,903 


2,208 
2,233 


- 


28 


6,630 


- 


- 


3 Not stated. 


4 Membership. 


5 Visits. 





None. 



1 No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



119 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 
Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 




f $750 2 
\ 5,350 


/ $21,102 


$15,692 


$8,310 


1 


10 


664 


273 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1,151 


1,138 


770 


- 


1 


463 


380 


2 


- 


2 


- 


1,467 
595 


1,534 
597 


1,260 


- 


1 


992 


178 


- 


4 


3 

4 


: 


12,743 
295 


13,044 
413 


6,637 
39 


~ 


27 
1 


191 


191 


2 


2 


5 
6 

7 


20,5542 


1,078 
52,389 


1,084 
56,027 


25,110 


- 


29 


79 


- 


- 


- 


8 
9 


- 


669 


692 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


- 


10 


- 


439 


928 


21 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


600 


7,382 


7,453 


2,520 


- 


2 


- 


- 


300 


- 


12 
13 


22,624 
22,280 


33,895 
26,046 
145,863 

835 


37,381 
23,037 
132,853 

250 


11,188 
40,587 


1 

2 


9 

78 


299 

58 

4,365 

2 


299 
19 

-3 


: 


: 


14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


100 


22,152 


22,178 


10,139 


- 


10 


439* 


-3 


- 


- 


19 


6,512 


8,232 
213 


7,812 
201 


6,207 


- 


6 


10,0025 


-3 


: 


3 


20 
21 


- 


889 


899 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


- 


2 


22 


- 


54,666 
16,698 


55,262 
15,248 


24,772 
5,508 


2 


28 
4 


1,383 
1,028 


_3 


- 


- 


23 

24 


- 


1,720 


1,741 


1,520 


- 


2 


288 


72 


95 


- 


25 


2,235 


127,419 


129,823 


71,945 


1 


50 


481 


- 


- 


- 


26 
27 

28 


- 


3,442 


2,832 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


39 


- 


- 


297,510 


289,259 


6,670 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


26 


29 


1,253 2 
400 2 


1,620 
8,838 
2,484 
2,057 
29,833 
45,053 


1,680 
8,625 
3,143 
2,295 
26,077 
48,530 


240 
1,395 

9,789 
15,376 


1 

1 

2 


3 

6 
8 


1,361 
150 

19 

7 

3,600 

7,724 


1,361 
150 

_3 
-3 

3,600 

7,724 


40 
1,931 


2 


30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 


20,555 


70,952 


67,477 


6,326 


- 


7 


287 


287 


- 


- 


36 


~ 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 


1,158 


22,117 
34,350 


22,555 
32,210 


8,317 
6,922 


1 


3 

-3 


4,6424 
323 


_3 

170 


- 


- 


38 
39 


113 


24,777 

435 

21,480 

10,418 
5,137 


23,042 

202 

11,311 

10,126 
5,455 


8,210 

509 

2,592 
471 


1 
1 


21 

2 

3 


547 

65 

1,629 

_3 


547 

-3 

_3 
_3 


83 


1 


40 
41 

42 
43 
44 
45 


- 


6,630 


6,655 


5,797 


- 


_3 


2,644 


2,620 


- 


9 


40 



120 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Springfield— Con. 
Mercy Hospital of Springfield, Mass., The, 233 Carew St. 

(280 bede) ...... 

New England District Council of the Assemblies of God, 

Inc., Springfield Ave. ....... 

Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul of 

Springfield, Mass., The, 43 Edwards St. 
Service League Foundation, Inc., 33 Pearl St. . 
Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children, The, 516 Carew 

St. (60 beds) 

Springfield Boys' Club, 260 Chestnut St. 

Springfield Day Nursery Corporation, 103 William St. 

Springfield Girls Club, 285 Chestnut St 

Springfield Girl Scouts Inc., 83 State St 

Springfield Goodwill Industries, Inc., 139 Lyman St. 
Springfield Home for Aged Men, 74 Walnut St. 
Springfield Home for Aged Women, 471 Chestnut St. 
Springfield Home for Friendless Women and Children, 136 

William St 

Springfield Hospital, The, 759 Chestnut St. (232 beds) . 
Springfield League for the Hard of Hearing, Inc., 1200 

Main St 

Springfield Rescue Mission, The, 36 Willow St. 
Springfield Young Men's Christian Association, The, 122 

Chestnut St. . . . . 

Springfield Young Women's Christian Association, 22 

Howard St. . . . . . . 

Travelers Aid Society of Springfield, Mass., Union Station . 
Visiting Nurse Association of Springfield, The, 83 State St. 
Wesson Maternity Hospital, 120 High St. (52 beds) . 
Wesson Memorial Hospital, 140 High St. (100 beds) . 



Stockbridge 

23 Austen Riggs Foundation Inc. (31 beds) .... 

Stoneham 

24 Home for Aged People in Stoneham, The 

25 New England Sanitarium and Benevolent Association (135 

beds) 

26 Stoneham Visiting Nurse Association .... 

Stoughton 

27 South Stoughton Community Service, Inc. 

Stow 

28 Red Acre Farm, Incorporated 

Sutton 

29 Wilkinsonville Community Association .... 

Swampscott 

30 Florence Crittenton Rescue League .... 

31 Swampscott Visiting Nurse and Family Welfare Associa- 

tion, The 

32 Swampscott Visiting Nurse Association 8 . 



33 Rest House, Inc. l 



Swansea 



Taunton 

34 Annawon Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 12 Weir St. 

35 Bethlehem Home, 61 Summer St 

36 Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society of Taunton, The 

37 Morton Hospital, 88 Washington St. (62 beds) 

38 Social Welfare League, Inc. of Taunton .... 

39 Taunton Boys' Club Association of Taunton, 31 Court St. 1 

40 Taunton Female Charitable Association, 96 Broadway 

41 Taunton Girls Club, Incorporated, The, Dean St. . 

42 Taunton Visiting Nurse Association Inc., The, 14 Church 

Green 

43 Young Men's Christian Association of Taunton, 71 Co- 

hannet St. 

44 Hospital Cottages for Children, The (120 beds) 

45 Ladies Social Circle Branch Alliance, Incorporated . 

46 Woman's Board of the Hospital Cottages for Children at 

Baldwinville, Massachusetts, The .... 



$917,049 


$10,099 


$247,991 


$12 


26 


755 


501 


- 


4,176 
838,658 


10,806 


2,126 


62 
23,360 


914,136 

268,467 

173,727 

63,127 

96,931 
382,212 
624,366 


62,870 
22,665 
7,628 
10,188 
6,746 
1,783 


1,309 
10,317 
1,414 
2,433 
915 
30,102 
1,534 
3,262 


21,372 
5,610 

13,222 
22,346 


413,136 
1,996,846 


7,021 
15,419 


2,381 
280,291 


16,457 
75,989 


653 

74,182 


255 
5,921 


714 
9,186 


- 


1,302,827 


23,923 


215,781 


7,814 


231,115 

132 

2,489 

401,002 

878,008 


9,386 
4,750 
25,653 
6,261 
1,589 


23,464 
108 
19,119 
78,121 
147,873 


4,723 

75 
8,521 
13,104 


465,040 


11,137 


83,793 


455 


152,395 


99 


243 


5,056 


284,215 
12,849 


4,161 
921 


424,049 
1,245 


444 


3,088 


13 


509 


- 


364,306 


1,075 


1,565 


16,105 


2,275 


- 


- 


8 


24,339 


2,728 


5,578 


- 


2,052 


2,022 


529 


- 



2,833 

206,052 

123 

291,485 

2,259 

139,180 
16,652 

38,430 

30,477 



690,822 
11,318 



30,330 



907 
214 
1,994 



155 
1,464 

2,923 

3,337 

12,796 
39 

76 



902 
51,813 



572 
112 



6,758 
3,600 



40,197 
214 



7,436 
73 



4,883 
24 



553 



17,556 
491 

1,038 



None. 



No report. 



* Not stated. 



3 Membership. 



Restricted to capital. 



* Attendance. 



Pt. II. 


















V. 


21 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 


















Current 
Receipts 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Average 
Number 


Service or Relief Given 










Families 






Legacies 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 
zations 






tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 














ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 




















viduals 






$5,361 


$263,464 


$239,043 


$85,412 




116 


9,149 


1,894 






i 


- 


1,257 


1,246 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


_ 


13,044 


10,873 


_ 


_ 


- 


1,865 


-2 


287 


_ 


3 


- 


23,360 


26,426 


2,148 


- 


3 


11 


- 


- 


11 


4 


2,682 


88,235 


84,749 


45,114 


_ 


53 


2,388 


2,388 


_ 


_ 


5 


- 


33,282 


33,281 


14,171 


- 


14 


3,1163 


1023 


- 


- 


6 


400^ 


14,653 


15,253 


6,760 


- 


13 


162 


- 


98 


14 


7 


- 


11,969 


11,969 


7,754 


- 


13 


942* 


- 


- 


- 


8 


— 


7,661 


7,661 


3,552 


- 


3 


1,6893 


_2 


- 


- 


9 


- 


31,885 


31,071 


18,972 


- 


30 


314 


314 


- 


- 


10 


- 


14,756 


12,282 


3,394 


1 


5 


19 


3 


- 


- 


11 


1,811* 


25,725 


28,125 


11,019 


- 


12 


61 


22 


- 


- 


12 


9,572 


35,432 


30,476 


14,437 


_ 


23 


395 


259 


_ 


28 


13 


- 


371,706 


370,397 


165,736 


- 


282 


11,751 


3,544 


- 


- 


14 


_ 


970 


877 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


15 


- 


15,107 


13,903 


3,782 


- 


6 


36,844 6 


21,568* 


- 


- 


16 


- 


248,347 


238,971 


77,740 


- 


80 


6,100* 


125* 


- 


- 


17 


- 


37,575 


36,734 


21,208 


- 


19 


68,877* 


22,100* 


- 


- 


18 


- 


4,858 


4,858 


4,272 


- 


3 


2,718 


_2 


278 


- 


19 


600* 


44,848 


44,822 


34,369 


- 


24 


60,3698 


38,121* 


- 


- 


20 


- 


92,903 


90,318 


49,887 


1 


75 


1,741 


376 


- 


- 


21 


- 


162,568 


158,342 


59,847 


- 


113 


3,440 


_2 


- 


- 


22 



38,703 



704 
7,160* 



3,504 
483 



2,983 
1,000 



95,385 



5,399 



101,944 



,515 



31,185 



424,049 
2,611 


419,045 
2,776 


152,830 
2,025 


522 


417 


- 


57,450 


11,631 


4,974 



177 
1 



8,306 
2,551 



5,500 

1,616 

214 

75,632 

73 

9,115 
2,085 

13,218 

7,937 



62,359 
744 



2,002 



8,369 
2,821 



4,317 

915 

264 

82,695 

80 

6,161 
1,337 

9,538 

6,452 



74; 



2,642 
1,871 



2,552 

30,459 

2,713 
640 

7,503 

3,066 

37.438 



432 



4,085 
2,804 e 



2,375? 



4 254 

2 2,764* 



203 



149 
,191 < 



2,359 7 



103 
1,384* 



1 


1,006* 
421 

_2 


_2 

384 

_2 


53 


2,302 


40 


5 

2 


15 
85 


15 
4 


_2 


1,067 


139 


3 


8,737 s 


956* 



150 



433 
1,956 



38 



10 



Visits. 



7 Animals. 



8 Name changed to The Swampscott Visiting Nurse and Family Welfare Association. 



122 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Topsfield 

1 Topsfield Community Club 

Uxbridqb 

2 H. H. Legge Relief Corps #153, Incorporated 

3 Uxbridge Samaritan Society 

Wakefield 

4 Elizabeth E. Boit Home for Aged Women 

5 Wakefield Hebrew Ladies Charitable Society . 

6 Wakefield Visiting Nurse Association .... 

7 Wakefield Young Men's Christian Association, The . 

Walpole 

8 Old Colony Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America 

9 Old Colony Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America (Camp 

Child) 

10 Walpole Visiting Nurse Association .... 

Waltham 

11 Hamblin L. Hovey Institute, Inc., 545 Main St. 

12 Jonas Willis Parmenter Rest Home, Inc., 542 Main St. 

13 Leland Home for Aged Women, The, 21 Newton St. 

14 Mount Prospect School, The, 90 Worcester Lane 

15 Waltham Baby Hospital, The, 759 Main St. (22 beds) 

16 Waltham District Nursing Association, 764 Main St. J 

17 Waltham Graduate Nurses Association .... 

18 Waltham Hospital, The, Hope Ave. (155 beds) 

19 Waltham Social Service League, 680 Main St. . 

Ware 

20 Mary Lane Hospital Association (33 beds) 

Warren 

21 South Warren Community, Incorporated, The . 

Watertown 

22 Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 

175 North Beacon St 

23 Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 

(Kindergarten for the Blind) 

24 Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 

(Howe Memorial Press Fund) . . . ... 

25 Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind 

(Works Department) 

26 Watertown Associated Charities, The, 47 Main St. . 

27 Watertown District Nursing Association, 83 Spring St. 

28 Watertown Home for Old Folks, 120 Mt. Auburn St. 

29 Watertown Unemployment Relief Committee, Inc., 17 

Main St 

30 Webster District Hospital (16 beds) s . 

Welleslet 

31 Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospital, The . 

32 Wellesley Friendly Aid Association 

33 Wellesley Hospital Fund, Incorporated . 

34 Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc., The 

Wenham 

35 Iron Rail Vacation Home . . . . 

Westborough 

36 Kirkside Ine., The ........ 

37 Westborougli District Nurse Association .... 

West Botlston 

38 Ladies Relief Corps of West Boylston, Mass., Inc. * . 

39 Noble Hospital, The Trustees of, 105 West Silver St. (83 

beds) 

40 Sarah Gillett Home for Aged People, The, 41 Broad St. . 

41 Shurtleff Mission to the Children of the Destitute, The, 160 

Franklin St 

42 Young Men's Christian Association of Westfield, The, 105 

Elm St 

- None. x No report. 2 Membership. 



$2,101 


$709 


$1,530 


$61 


7,013 
5,840 


128 
1,604 


179 
2,265 


502 


81,622 

179 

3,026 

56,719 


1,894 
127 
723 

4,370 


3,019 

1,773 
1,451 


1,810 

93 
50 


41 


5,411 


369 


- 


10,078 
4,311 


34 
941 


5,985 
1,076 


64 


344,458 
343,767 
208,125 
169,663 
49,260 


1,853 
463 


84 
2,145 


7,359 
13,155 

8,041 
15,885 

2,244 


11,678 

1,081,082 

4,868 


748 
7,890 
5,488 


99 

159,561 

794 


7 
15,902 

277 


284,358 


605 


25,727 


1,842 


209 


7 


1 


5 


2,860,401 


1,964 


101,067 


93,258 


2,594,023 


120 


67,917 


88,045 


251,649 


- 


11,634 


14,577 


1,025 
17,819 
109,887 


104 

1,700 

392 


37,051 

3 

5,565 

1,000 


35 

525 

4,784 


158 


450 


- 


- 


12,802 


- 


15,895 


614 


839,653 


22,831 


10,397 


22,101 


8,798 

99,403 

125,330 


6,800 
23,029 


2,855 

112 

10,640 


5,010 
4,186 



72,930 



74,768 

568 - 



801,007 
63,087 

133,284 

43,648 



500 
12 



30 



932 
459 



43,096 



1,535 
17 



3,497 



35,019 
6,763 


28,406 
1,209 


114 


5,624 


2,481 


617 



3 Not stated. 



Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



123 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 

Number 

of Paid 

Em- 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 





Families 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


viduals 


sive of 


Free 


Indi- 




viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$200 



2,075 



9,407 



19,217 



4,000 



$2,301 



47,392 



450 



20,527 



$2,290 



$1,754 



308 
4,456 


271 
4,535 


3,529 


6,924 

127 

2,550 

5,871 


4,632 

118 

2,817 

5,310 


1,686 

2,083 
3,347 


5,780 


5,766 


1,560 


6,019 
4,157 


6,815 
2,113 


1,220 
792 


7,359 
13,155 

8,286 
15,969 

4,853 


9,888 
9,231 
7,894 
16,964 
6,117 


2,148 
4,445 
2,675 
9,824 
3,779 


856 

75,413 

6,560 


725 

176,595 

7,151 


75,660 
2,334 



45,379 



19,407 



28,584 


224,874 


171,341 


89,263 


12,724 


268,808 


156,247 


80,633 


- 


26,211 


26,501 


2,300 


- 


37,051 

143 

7,791 

6,177 


42,985 
126 

7,897 
5,689 


26,739 

6,790 
2,457 



5,002 



16,361 



7,863 



12 



271 

727 

12 

301 

296 2 

1,433 2 



793 



63,732 
8,040 


65,389 
8,461 


28,962 
3,260 


1 
1 


42 

7 


1,112 
21 


5,738 


5,557 


1,713 


- 


1 


14 


6,596 


6,615 


2,935 


- 


4 


2872 



95 



151 



f 2.500M 
















2,734 J 


58,065 


64,961 


30,802 


- 


30 


494 


259 


175 


9,831 


9,081 


3,444 


- 


5 


777 


386 


12,500 


17,623 


2,328 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


f 2,500 M 
I 200 J 
















38,057 


30,508 


4,344 


1 


2 


168 


-3 


- 


43,096 


53,798 


12,573 


1 


9 


5,570 


5,570 


_ 


2,967 


3,217 


1,720 


_ 


2 


8 


5 


- 


489 


731 


482 


- 


2 


2,402 6 


1,071 6 



34 



421 



10 
2 


313 

295 


-3 

65 


: 


3 
3 
4 
9 
25 


1,000 

58 

16 

7 

418 


1,000 
58 

7 
146 


; 


110 

2 


14 
2,934 


14 
128 


2 
526 


25 


1,037 


23 


- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


86 


174 


20 


- 


83 


119 


- 


- 


10 


- 


- 


- 


30 

7 
4 


45 

1,327 

6 


45 
308 


1,047 


- 


234 


234 


79 



981 



' Report for 8 months. 



6 Visits. 



124 



P.D. 17. 

Abstract of Reports of Private 



Name'and'Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Westford 

1 Ladies' Sewing Society and Women's Branch Alliance of the 

Unitarian Church $11,123 

Westport 

2 Watuppa Grange, No. 365, Patrons of Husbandry, Incor- 

porated 

West Springfield 

3 Horace A. Moses Foundation Incorporated 

4 West Springfield Neighborhood House Association . 

Westwood 

5 Scoutland, Inc 

Weymouth 

6 Weymouth Hospital (46 beds) . . . . . 

7 Weymouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

Whitman 

8 Rogers Home for Aged Women 

9 Whitman Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. i 

WlLLIAMSTOWN 

10 Williamstown Welfare Association .... 7,532 



WlNCHENDON 

11 Winchendon Boys Club, Inc 

12 Winchendon Hospital, Incorporated .... 

Winchester 

13 Home for Aged People in Winchester, The 

14 Winchester District Nursing Association .... 

15 Winchester Hospital (58 beds) 

16 Winchester Unemployment Relief Committee, Inc. . 

Winthrop 

17 Association of the Hawthorne Club .... 

18 Tifareth Israel Congregation of Winthrop 

19 Winthrop Community Hospital Aid Association, Incor- 

porated, The 

20 Winthrop Community Hospital, Incorporated (39 beds) . 

21 Winthrop Hebrew Community Association, Inc. 

22 Winthrop Visiting Nurse Association Incorporated . 

23 Winthrop Young Men's Hebrew Association Inc. 1 . 

Woburn 

24 Home for Aged Women in Woburn, 74 Elm St. 1 

25 Winning Home 

26 Woburn Charitable Association (operating Charles Choate 

Memorial Hospital), 21 Warren Ave. (39 beds) 

27 Young Men's Christian Association of Woburn, Mass., The, 

555 Main St. 1 

Worcester 

28 Angora Orphan Aid Association, The 1 .... 

29 Associated Charities of Worcester, The, 2 State St. x . 

30 Association of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, 46 High St. . 

31 Bais Hatveloh, 24 Arlington St. . 

32 Board of the Swedish Lutheran Old Peoples Home, of Wor- 

cester, Mass., Inc., The, 26 Harvard St. 

33 Camp Fire Girls of Worcester, Inc., 16 Norwich St. . 

34 Child Guidance Association of Worcester, 21 Catharine St. 

35 Community Chest of Worcester, Massachusetts, Inc., The, 

Lincoln Sq 

36 Fairlawn Hospital, Inc., 189 May St. (45 beds) 

37 Fraternity Franco-Am6ricaine, Worcester Branch, Inc. 

38 Friendly House, Inc., 38 Wall St 

39 Girls' League for Service, Inc., 274 Main St. * . 

40 Girls Welfare Society of Worcester Inc., 5 Claremont St. . 

41 Guild of St. Agnes of Worcester, The, 20 Vernon St. 

42 Harpoot Assyrian United Association of America, The 1 

43 Hebrew Free Loan Society, Inc. of Worcester . 

44 Home Association for Aged Colored People, 63 Parker St. 

45 Home for Aged Men in Worcester, 1199 Main St. 

46 Home for Aged Women in the city of Worcester, The Trus- 

tees of the, 1183 Main St 

47 Hopital Louis Pasteur, 25 Catharine St. (36 beds) . 



$316 



582 


$576 


$1,163 


12 


,976,936 


12,996 


18,318 


36,524 


69,326 


3,042 


- 


480 


109,115 
2,414 


121 

772 


83,138 
4,201 


49 
43 


29,779 


341 


29 


584 



451,291 
20,000 

140,860 
20,096 
6,546 

37,870 

255,519 

22 

217 

66,635 
140,973 

3,164 

11,459 

494,609 

597,577 
64,538 



,362 



7,123 
1,140 

3,879 
3,735 
6,138 

463,493 
23,244 

3,997 

9,644 
14,736 

600 



1,532 
110 



23,307 



5,928 

4,190 

495 



31,779 

112 

976 
6,777 

9,466 

253 

1,946 

1,500 
12,261 



277 



41,04,8 
2,771 


676 
3,388 


60 


1,449 
36 


178,728 

4,103 

430,417 

20 


2,441 

1,399 

7,924 

8 


13,130 

2,384 

82,939 

12 


5,736 

107 

4,687 


9,497 
85,027 


955 
3,944 


45 
342 


43 


192 

172,890 

94 

660 


162 

2,442 
2,734 
1,278 


294 

54,453 

4,967 

2,136 


150 
8 


54,098 


_ 


_ 


1,889 


346,827 


2,288 


49,205 


5,425 



2,312 
227 

343 



741 
16 

30 

18,270 

25,113 



- None. l No report. 2 Not stated. 3 Visits. * Report not due. 6 Restricted to capital. 8 Membership. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued 



125 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$1,000 



19,416* 



$316 



1,751 



54,842 
13,065 



3.928 



83,511 
5,017 



955 



$189 



1,995 



38,674 
13,065 



5,724 



84,492 
4,671 



2,404 



5,406 
7,439 



1,730 



33,223 
4,096 



943 



9,639 


9,709 


3,230 


2,185 
3,425 


2,330 
951 


1,730 


22,308 

3,891 

95,551 

20 


7,802 

3,660 

87,824 

597 


3,259 

3,003 

45,766 


1,043 
4,286 


1,233 

4,276 


378 
1,173 


456 

57,046 
7,701 
3,422 


480 

59,236 

7,790 

3,226 


27,459 
2,080 
2,760 


1,889 


1,594 


_ 


56,919 


52,399 


27,186 



7,183 


39,926 
1,140 


35,670 
1,140 


3,354 


600 


10,636 
7,925 
5,372 


12,521 
7,253 
5,394 


4,773 
3,558 
2,522 


- 


463,836 
56,095 


454,415 

47,865 


12,347 
15,749 


- 


4,109 


4,217 


2,412 


- 


11,781 
21,530 


11,907 
21,530 


6,257 
6,838 


- 


10,096 

2,283 

28,055 


9,281 
2,126 
17,483 


624 
6,815 


7,197 


35,845 
12,371 


26,417 
13,957 


9,874 
5,549 



52 



2,500 



1,705 
1,2843 



377 



343 



_2 
6423 



377 



5 

3 

56 


19 
3,8413 
1,555 
5 


8363 
8 
5 


5 
2 


95 


95 


30 

1 
2 


1,554 

100 

2,846 


8 

_2 

410 



28 



173 



28 



101 



5 

3 

8 


43 

_2 

547 


_2 

547 


_ 


4 
26 


564 


6 


- 


8 


579 • 


_2 


400 


5 

16 


303 
1,396 


273 
1,167 


283 


3 
9 


111 

8 

39 


111 


: 


13 
10 


39 
259 


- 


- 



24 



10 



20 



126 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 





Subscriptions 
and Gifts 




Total 


Earnings 


Property 


Restricted 


and 


Reported 


or not 


Refunds 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



Worcester— Con. 

1 Italian American War Veterans Association, Inc. ' . 

2 Jewish Home for Aged and Orphans of Worcester, Mass., 

1029 Pleasant St 

3 Junior League of Worcester, Inc., 2 State St. . 

4 Lithuanian Aged Peoples Aid Society, Inc. 

5 Lithuanian Charitable Society, The, 41 Providence St. x . 

6 Little Franciscan Sisters of Mary, 37 Thorne St. 

7 Memorial Home for the Blind, The, 51 Harvard St. and 81 

Elm St 

8 Memorial Hospital, The, 119 Belmont St. (158 beds) 

9 North Worcester Aid Society, 58 Holden St. . 

10 Odd Fellows Home of Massachusetts, 40 Randolph Rd. 

11 Osteopathic Clinic Association of New England, Th«, 3 

Ball St. ... . 

12 Rest Home Association, 8 Homestead Ave. 

13 Rotary Club Education Fund of Worcester, The 

14 St. Anne's French Canadian Orphanage, 133 Granite St. . 

15 St. Vincent Hospital of Worcester, Massachusetts, The, 73 

Vernon St. (205 beds) 

16 Southern Worcester County Health Association, Incor- 

porated, 5 Pleasant St. 

17 Syrian Brotherhood Orthodox Society of Worcester, 32 

Wall St 

18 Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society, The, 10 

Edward St. . . . 

19 United Jewish Charities of Worcester, Inc., The, 10 Wav- 

erlySt 

20 Worcester Animal Rescue League, 139 Holden St. . 

21 Worcester Area Council, Inc., 201 Commercial St. . 

22 Worcester Boys' Club, Lincoln Sq 

23 Worcester Children's Friend Society, 2 State St. 

24 Worcester City Missionary Society, The, 2 Hackfeld Rd. . 

25 Worcester County Association for the Blind, Inc., 2 State 

St 

26 Worcester Employment Society, The, 2 State St. 

27 Worcester Garden City, Inc. . . 

28 Worcester Girls Club House Corporation, 67 Lincoln St. . 

29 Worcester Girl Scout Council, Inc., 544 Main St. 

30 Worcester Hahnemann Hospital, 281 Lincoln St. (99 beds) 

31 Worcester Lions Club Charitable Corporation 

32 Worcester Society for District Nursing, 2 State St. . 

33 Worcester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 

The, 390 Main St. * 

34 Worcester Swedish Charitable Association, 2 State St. 

35 Worcester Womans Club, 10 Tuckerman St. . 

36 Young Men's Christian Association of Worcester, The, 766 

Main St. ... 

37 Young Women's Christian Association of Worcester, 6 

Chatham St 

Wrentham 

38 King's Daughters and Sons' Home for the Aged in Norfolk 

County Massachusetts, The 

Yarmouth 

39 Friday Club, The 

40 South Yarmouth Woman's Club, Inc. .... 



Headquarters Outside op Commonwealth 
Albanian-American School of Agriculture, New York, N. Y. 
American Association of Medical Social Workers, Chicago, 

111.' 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, New York, 

N.Y 

American Baptist Home Mission Soc'y, The, New York, N. Y. 

American Peace Society, Washington, D. C. 

Boys' Clubs of America, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Millenium Guild, The, New York, N. Y. 

Palou Reconstruction Union, The, Astoria, L. I., N. Y. l . 

Woman's American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, New 

York, N.Y 



$168,151 

6,320 

119 


$21,074 

2,332 

37 


$8,418 
2,355 


$16 

155 

3 


493,193 


3,550 


55,007 


1,054 


223,423 

1,829,309 

11,482 

812,082 


805 
18,069 

164 
42,265 


8,742 

211,262 

838 

3,859 


5,521 

41,502 

19 

11,091 


211 

55,248 

1,919 

355,688 


47 

2,915 

1,566 

10,926 


139 

6,692 

1,676 

20,420 


597 
817 


705,148 


7,414 


192,638 


- 


38,735 


19,595 


160 


490 


6,574 


128 


152 


50 


175,062 


6,462 


400 


6,233 


3,521 
33,173 


15,665 
391 


483 
1,732 


1,273 


35,231 
755,275 
387,310 

83,017 


18,532 

53,307 

23,842 

1,949 


6,558 
4,600 
7,179 
1,526 


305 

9,372 
16,996 
2,507 


1,412 
97,360 
48 
101,972 
10,927 
681,977 
1,255 
296,162 


294 
6,569 
3,391 
11,981 

4,772 

10 
46,810 


427 
2,994 

818 

5,193 

119,772 

313 

22,722 


4,129 

2,072 

40 

10,871 

14,140 


29,423 
102,543 


11,360 
10,365 


117 
3,831 


1,285 


1,019,822 


39,313 


136,985 


7,538 


690,190 


26,886 


56,822 


18,355 



296,246 



2,704 

114 

4,403 

10,005,150 
17,394,250 

244 
111,476 

529 

2,379,070 



2,105 



248 



3,735 

8,575 

465,687 

210,299 

5,402 

62,295 

705 



253,985 



,661 



205 
279 



159 



8,718 



273 
4 



10,558 


406,178 


9,276 


661,437 


438 


- 


547 


3,305 
5 



11,463 



43,488 



Totals . $360,862,685 $14,996,661 $23,527,104 $9,575,120 



None. 1 No report. 2 Restricted to capital. *» Animals. * Not stated. 8 Membership. 6 Visits. 7 Report for 8 months. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Concluded. 



127 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$2,060 



4,940 2 
5,1042 



21,715 



$23,634 

4,842 

40 

61,701 

15,069 

269,728 

1,021 

79,125 

186 

10,204 

4,059 

30,846 

200,053 

21,937 

330 

13,096 



$18,611 

4,250 

33 

59,154 

14,843 

281,457 

613 

55,784 

117 

10,507 

4,173 

30,378 

179,919 

19,710 

152 

12,957 



$8,927 



8,854 

6,476 
117,341 

20,983 

41 

3,985 

210 

6,279 

63,389 

7,851 



6,833 



252 

500 »\ 

2,550 J 


16,149 


16,747 


5,636 


5,948 


3,152 


1,078 


- 


25,395 


24,661 


11,903 


8,1722 


67,279 


67,415 


43,822 


3,410 


51,428 


46,548 


13,962 


- 


5,983 


7,613 


3,179 


_ 


721 


878 


_ 


- 


13,692 


14,309 


2,406 


— 


3,391 


3,342 


2,061 


3,0002 


14,873 


14,525 


10,032 


3,000 2 


10,064 


10,597 


3,010 


2,7752 


130,644 


138,401 


45,928 


- 


324 


163 


- 


14,865 


98,548 


83,680 


70,959 


_ 


11,477 


11,814 


1,934 


385 


15,867 


13,493 


3,060 


- 


183,836 


176,911 


95,875 


6,2772 


102,064 


102,064 


55,003 



13 


50 


30 


- 


- 


8 


8 


- 


22 


975 


779 


8 


12 


25 


_ 


_ 


205 


15,324 


752 


- 


31 


154 


154 


- 


1 


430 


117 


_ 


9 


23 


1 


- 


1 


23 


23 


- 


18 


140 


68 


- 


205 


4,996 


162 


- 


8 


4,870 


4,870 


27 


- 


8 


8 


2 


9 


327 


244 


16 


7 


445 


445 


- 


2 


4,755 » 


-4 


_ 


6 


3,350« 


- 


- 


65 


7,7525 


1,247 s 


- 


9 


189 


124 


156 


3 


- 4 


- 4 


- 


_ 


18 


18 


_ 


2 


137 


_4 


61 


2 


- 


- 


- 


18 


2,258 


274 


- 


3 


1,656 s 


_4 


- 


69 


1,972 


79 


- 


- 


85 


85 


- 


46 


14,675 6 


10,566 6 


7,506 


1 


_ 


_ 


242 



102 



370 s 



1,911 



23 



15,495 



14,960 



5,579 



- 


529 
533 


484 
384 


~ 


: 


^ 


- 


3,735 


3,635 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8,868 


9,421 


3,337 


2 


1 


60,000 

20,084 

817 


926,344 

908,580 

6,658 

66,148 

710 


1,078,295 

751,098 

7,679 

70,553 

217 


729,417 

-4 

5,483 
47,113 


2 
1 


386 

600 

1 

13 



276 



9,000 



317,937 



331,606 



19,461 



/ $2,279,906 2 \ 

\ 2,337,910 / $49,808,426 $47,361,111 $19,: 



3,833 



384 



23,586 3,751,484" l,724,376 b 104,069 



» Total includes: 1,729,243 individuals; 106,495 membership; 690,179 attendance; 261,146 visits; 747,578 animals; 216,843 1 
b Total includes: 781,393 individuals; 8,215 membership; 169,505 attendance; 95,182 visits; 668,807 animals, 1,274 census. 



128 P.D. 17. 

Part III 
THE CITY AND TOWN INFIRMARIES 

AND 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF 

Francis Bardwell, Supervising Inspector of Infirmaries 

Laws Relating to Infirmaries 

(General Laws, Chapter Ifl; Tercentenary Edition) 

For the information of boards of public welfare, superintendents of infirmaries 
and others concerned, certain laws relating to infirmaries are here summarized. 

The Department of Public Welfare is required to visit annually all city and town 
infirmaries, and to include in its annual report a statement of their condition and 
management, with its suggestions and recommendations relative thereto. (Gen- 
eral Laws, ch. 121, sect. 7.) 

The superintendent of every infirmary must keep a register, in the form pre- 
scribed by the Department of Public Welfare, of the names of the persons received 
or committed, the cities or towns to which they belong, and the dates of their 
reception and discharge. (General Laws, ch. 47, sect. 8.) 

Every inmate of an infirmary able to work shall be kept diligently employed in 
labor. If he is idle and does not perform such reasonable task as is assigned, or if 
he is stubborn and disorderly, he shall be punished according to the orders and 
regulations established by the directors. (General Laws, ch. 117, sects. 21 and 22. 
See also opinion of Attorney-General given to State Board of Charity, November 
21, 1904.) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or town infirmary 
for a period of more than two months are: (1) those who are so defective in body or 
mind as to make their retention in an infirmary desirable; (2) those who are under 
two years of age; and (3) those who are under three years of age, with mothers who 
are infirmary inmates and suitable persons to aid in taking care of them. In 
cases of failure of boards of public welfare to remove children illegally in infirma- 
ries, the Department of Public Welfare is required to remove them and provide 
for them otherwise, at the expense of the city or town concerned. (General Laws, 
ch. 117, sects. 36-38.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants, if physically able, shall perform 
labor of some kind, and shall be lodged under conditions prescribed by the State 
Department of Public Health. (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 20.) 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorized to advise with and assist local 
boards of public welfare in preparation of plans for infirmary buildings. (General 
Laws, ch. 121, sect. 38.) 

Inspection of Infirmaries 

As required by law, every infirmary has been visited once by the Department's 
inspector. Two have been visited twice. There are in Massachusetts 117 infirma- 
ries which cared for 10,701 inmates during the past municipal year. 

Infirmaries Closed 

The infirmary at Douglas was closed because of the small number of inmates. 

Construction — New and Contemplated 

Chicopee — Is still contemplating a new infirmary. 

Easthampton — To provide more room for inmates. 

Holyoke — To provide additional quarters for inmates. 

Lawrence — To add two new wings. 

Methuen — New infirmary. 

New Bedford — New wing for the men. 

Springfield — Remodeling isolation hospital. 



Pt. III. 129 

Recommendations Made 

Adams — That the cancer cases being cared for be removed to some institution 
suitable for the purpose of giving them the proper care. 

Amesbury — That new wiring be installed as present wiring is open and presents 
a fire hazard. That there be arrangements made to increase the capacity of the 
infirmary, which is overcrowded at present. 

Lawrence — That other provisions be made for the minor child who is illegally 
held in the Infirmary. 

Marshfield — That if the Infirmary be used as a home for bed cases, there be a 
permanent assistant appointed to aid the matron. 

Townsend — That improvements be made in the water supply and bathroom 
facilities, as both are inadequate. 

Winchendon — That the veteran be removed to a State institution where he 
would receive proper medical care. 

Infirmary Visitors 

The infirmary visitors are local residents, giving their services under the Com- 
missioner's appointment. Those in office now are: Adams, Mrs. H. E. Davis; 
Andover, Mrs. Frank L. Brigham; Boston, Miss Theresa M. Lally; Easthampton, 
Mrs. M. J. O'Neill; Fall River, Mrs. Joseph E. Barre; Fitchburg, Mrs. T. R. Shea 
and Mrs. E. B. Crocker; Greenfield, Mrs. Henry F. Nash; Holyoke, Mrs. John M. 
James; Lancaster, Miss Mary Belle Bailey; Lawrence, Mrs. Lewis A. Foye; 
Maiden, Mrs. Harvey L. Boutwell, Mrs. Catherine A. Lovejoy and Mrs. Ellen 
Woolfson; Manchester, Mrs. Grace L. Porter; Marlborough, Mrs. L. H. Tourtel- 
lotte; Milton, Mrs. Martha S. Arnold and Mrs. William H. Sias; Monson, Mrs. 
Herbert M. Smith; Montague, Mrs. Richard R. Lyman; Nantucket, Mrs. 
Josephine S. Brooks; Natick, Mrs. James E. White; Newburyport, Mrs. Frederick 
Tigh; Newton, Mrs. Winnifred W. Hills and Mrs. Arthur W. Chamberlain; North 
Adams, Mrs. Lida A. Kimball and Miss lone Northrup; Northampton, Miss Clara 

C. Allen; North Attleborough, Mrs. George A. Livingston; Pittsfield, Miss Frances 

D. Robbins; Randolph, Mrs. Daniel F. Flynn; Somerville, Mrs. Marguerite E. 
Kauler; Springfield, Mrs. W. H. Church, Mrs. Laura H. Congdon and Mrs. 
Katherine R. Hatch; Townsend, Mrs. James H. Bennett; Waltham, Mrs. Anna 
Fogg and Mrs. Pryor Fulton; Ware, Mrs. Andrew Campion; Warren, Mrs. Edna 
Deland; Winchendon, Mrs. John P. Bartlett and Mrs. Frank B. Spalter; Worces- 
ter, Miss Nellie E. Barrett and Mrs. Charles F. Darling. 

Improvements 

Andover, the road to the infirmary was rebuilt and widened, new radio, and 
outside of buildings painted. Barnstable, one-half of barn and ell were shingled, 
underpinnings of barn and house repaired. Billerica, painted inmates' quarters 
and house on the outside. Bridgewater, put in a new sprinkler system, installed 
water heater, painted house inside and out. Brookline, new screens, two new 
floors laid. Clinton, painted inside the infirmary. Dedham, laid new floors 
throughout. Duxbury, painted rooms upstairs. Easthampton, installed new bath 
for women, fireproof doors and partitions installed in the hallway, new washing 
machine and truck, painted inmates' rooms. Easton, buildings shingled and 
inmates' rooms painted. Fitchburg, covered three floors with linoleum, added 
bath tub, lavatory and toilet in women's quarters, added three rooms to the 
warden's quarters. Franklin, reshingled the buildings and painted outside. Gard- 
ner, installed new kitchen range, new floors laid and house painted outside. 
Gloucester, new boiler, new fire escapes with fireproof doors and smoke corridors, 
two new bathrooms, new floors laid in the annex, remodeled the boiler room, and 
firep roofed the dumb-waiter, walls and ceilings of thirty-five rooms sheet-rocked. 
Hanson, new frigidaire. Harwich, two new lavatories. Haverhill, new refriger- 
ator, dumb-waiter installed on the first and second floors. Hingham, house painted 
inside and out. Holliston, house painted outside. Hudson, house painted inside. 
Lynn, new fire alarm system and painted inmates' rooms. Maiden, new sun 
porch on the women's side and new wall built around the yard. Mansfield, inlaid 
linoleum in the kitchen, set tubs and sinks installed. Marlborough, built a drain 



130 P.D. 17. 

in front of house, new clothes yard and duck pond, painted house inside. Marsh- 
field, electric refrigerator. Medford, new glassed-in piazza with hardwood floor. 
Middleborough, reshingled the house and barn, repiped the water system. Mil- 
ford, new gas stove, showers installed for women, shingled house and barn and 
hardwood floors laid. Montague, painted outside of the house and enlarged the 
kitchen. Nantucket, two new furnaces, new hot water heater, and new chimney. 
New Bedford, new brick dormitory for men, rebuilt stone wall and wooden fences. 
Newburyport, completely remodeled inside of house, painted outside, installed 
brass pipes and new hot water tank. Newton, painted inmates' rooms. North 
Andover, remodeled men's smoking rooms, installed a radio, re-roofed the barn 
and sheds, main and sewer pipes renewed. North Attleborough, new pipes for heat- 
ing system, new hot water system. North Brookfield, painted house and barn 
on outside. Northampton, new electric refrigerator. Norwell, new washing ma- 
chine. Palmer, new drinking cups and stanchions for the barns. Pittsfield, new 
smoking room and dining room, laundry remodeled downstairs, new fire escape 
from the dormitory, new sprinkler system and fire alarm system installed, new 
piazza on the men's side, baker sterilizer and violet ray lamp installed. Randolph, 
oil burner installed. Rockland, new double oven range and hot water heating 
system, remodeled men's bathroom, new driveway and landscaping done. Salem, 
new electric refrigerator, new ceilings, walls and floors, heating system renewed. 
Somerville, buildings repaired, buildings shingled, new smoking room. South 
Hadley, new floor and dining room for men. Spencer, two new sun parlors, 
enlarged kitchen. Springfield, new fire towers either end of building, complete 
rewiring, new shower for men, inside of both buildings painted, two new bath- 
rooms installed. Stoneham, remodeled kitchen and built new dining room, in- 
stalled new gas range, painted and papered inside of house. Sutton, bathrooms 
for inmates and one for warden installed, house and barn painted, new milk room 
built. Taunton, painted the house. Upton, new well and cow barn, cement dam 
and pond, barn wired for electricity, new water system and electric pump. Wake- 
field, brass pipes installed throughout, house and barn painted. Ware, painted 
inside and out. Webster, new bathroom and showers for men. Westborough, new 
electric fixtures, for the house, heating system remodeled, fire system installed, 
new hard-wood floors throughout the buildings. Westfield, two fire escapes added, 
new hot water' boiler, new electric refrigerator, and new range. Westford, new 
boiler room and new radiators, hot water system installed throughout. Wrentham, 
new boiler and hot water heater, inmates' rooms painted and warden's side redeco- 
rated. Charlton, steam heat with central furnace installed. 



Pt. III. 



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Pt. III. 135 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF 

Numbers Relieved 

The following information covers public relief, whether rendered in institu- 
tions or outside, and aid rendered by all public agencies, whether State or local. 
The total number of persons aided appears in Table I, alone. Of this total the 
number of those aided by reason of unemployment are omitted in all the following 
tables. The tables analyze by age, sex and nativity, the number of persons 
relieved, except those aided by reason of unemployment, and the tabulations are 
concluded by figures for cost of all relief. 

A complete analysis of the data in regard to individuals aided by reason of un- 
employment is omitted this year for the following reasons: It has seemed to us 
unwise to require each year during the depression that cities and towns send us 
the names and social statistics of all persons aided because of unemployment. 
A sufficient indication of the facts about this group is contained in the Annual 
Report for the year ending November 30, 1932. Since that time the burden upon 
cities and towns and upon this Department in collecting and tabulating these 
statistics has become so heavy that it creates an unjustifiable expense to attempt 
to analyze each family every year. 

Table I shows the number supported or relieved by the several cities and towns 
during the year beginning April 1, 1934, and ending March 31, 1935. All persons 
are included, regardless of settlement. The total number receiving aid in any 
form, exclusive of vagrants and wayfarers was 555,197. Of this number, 391,215 
were aided on account of unemployment, mostly in their own homes. The 
remainder, 163,982, were aided as follows: — 21,490 in institutions, and 142,492 
outside, either in private families or in their own homes. Of the persons aided in 
institutions, 9,524 were relieved in the various city and town infirmaries, leaving 
11,966 who were cared for in other institutions. It should be noted that certain 
cities which have city hospitals have not reported persons aided therein under 
"poor relief." To include these would add approximately 45,000 to the persons 
aided in "other institutions." Of the outside aid, 14,911 cases were aided in pri- 
vate families other than their own, while 127,581 were reported as having been 
aided in their own homes. This last figure comprises practically all city and town 
aid usually known as local public outdoor relief, including that under Chapters 118 
and 118 A of the General Laws. 

Table II supplies the same data for persons aided or relieved by the Common- 
wealth as shown in Table I for local relief. In addition to aid rendered directly 
by the Commonwealth, this table includes also all those cases included in Table I, 
in which the relief has been rendered by cities and towns in the first instance and 
reimbursed by the Commonwealth as required by law. This table shows 35,402 
persons aided by the Commenwealth. Of this number, the aid in 30,416 cases 
was first rendered by the several cities and towns. The remaining 4,986 cases 
were aided by the Commonwealth; 4,461 of them at the State Infirmary; 8 in the 
Infirmary Ward at the State Farm; and 517 at the Massachusetts Hospital School. 

Table III affords a rapid glance at the movement of the population in the 
dependent group during the year under analysis. As previously explained, it 
should be remembered that persons aided by reason of unemployment are excluded 
from this table and the following tables. The persons who passed out of care 
during the year number 52,596. Those in this total released by death number 
4,222, and 2,454 persons were transferred. At the close of the year, therefore, 
the Commonwealth had 111,386 persons in receipt of relief. 

Table IV begins classification of the number of persons aided except those aided 
by reason of unemployment, and shows the analysis by color, nativity and sex. 
Of the 163,982 persons so aided, 79,204 were males and 84,778 females. The 
native-born whites— 160,523— number about four times the foreign-born of the 
white races. 

Table V gives a further interesting analysis of the native-born persons aided 
during the year classified by parent nativity. 

The parents of 48,097 were both native; 40,871 were children of foreign-born 
parents; 22,849 were of parents one of whom was foreign-born or unknown; while 



136 P.D. 17. 

the nativity of parents in 9,785 cases remained unascertained. It appears, there- 
fore, that of the 103,982 persons receiving aid during the year, there were at least 
81,907 who were either foreign-born or were of the first generation in our citi- 
zenship. 

By Table VI it appears that of the 163,982 cases analyzed, 7,385 were under 
five; 41,975 were under fifteen; 59,360, or 36.20 per cent including the above, 
were under twenty; 55,233, or 33.68 per cent, were between twenty and sixty; and 
47,256, or 28.82 per cent, were over that age. The ages of 2,133 were unknown. 

Among the poor persons relieved there is always a considerable number of 
mental defectives who for one reason or another have not been committed and 
are therefore not cared for in the special institutions, such as the mental hospitals, 
maintained for that purpose. In regard to this class it is to be noted further that 
since no court has passed upon their mental condition, their classification here 
is made only because, in the opinion of the respective authorities making the 
returns, there is no doubt of their defect. Table VII affords a rough classification 
into three groups, according to the nature of the defect, and a division by sex. 
The total number thus cared for was 290, namely 174 males and 116 females. 
Two hundred fifty-seven (257) of these cases were relieved by cities and towns; 
the remaining 33, having no settlement, were aided at the expense of the Common- 
wealth. One hundred fifty (150) of the whole number were classed as "insane," 
mostly the senile and mildly insane to be found in the infirmaries. This total 
includes 95 males and 55 females. One hundred three (103) were called "idiotic," 
namely 55 males and 48 females. The "epileptics" totaled 37, of whom 24 were 
males and 13 were females. 

Table VIII calls attention more pointedly to the sex and nature of discharge 
from relief of those persons who passed out of aid during the year. Of the 52,596 
cases so dismissed, 27,379 were males and 25,217 were females. Thirty and nine- 
tenths (30.9) per cent, or 16,228 were released to the care of relatives or friends. 
About 4 per cent, or 2,454, of the whole number were transferred to other insti- 
tutions, while 56 per cent of the aggregate were discharged without relatives or 
friends or other authorities agreeing to look after them. The great majority in 
this last group were persons assisted through illness, after which they became 
self-supporting again. 

As appears from Table IX the foreign-born who were receiving public relief 
during the year number 41,036 or 25 per cent of the entire number of persons 
analyzed. This percentage is two-tenths of one per cent more than the proportion 
of foreign-born in the population generally, — 24.8 per cent. Canada furnished 
12,467 of this number; England and Wales, 3,216; Germany, 660; Ireland, 7,736; 
Italy, 5,408; Russia and Poland, 4,038; Scandinavia, 973; Scotland, 884 and all 
other countries, 5,654. 

Table X shows the percentage of the various classes analyzed to the whole num- 
ber. Thus, of the 163,982 persons analyzed, 78.41 per cent were settled cases, 
receiving their assistance out of local taxes; 21.59 per cent were unsettled, and 
though relieved by the respective cities and towns, in the first instance in a ma- 
jority of cases, were ultimately aided out of the state tax. As to the place in which 
relief was given, 13.11 per cent of the total were aided in institutions, namely, 
4.26 per cent in infirmaries, 3.04 per cent in state institutions, and 5.81 per cent 
in other institutions, mostly under private management. Outdoor relief, desig- 
nated as aid "outside," was given in 86.89 per cent of all the cases. Most of these, 
namely, 77.80 per cent were relieved in their own homes. Aid was given in pri- 
vate families other than the recipient's own — mostly boarded cases — in 9.09 per 
cent instances. Percentages of age show that 37.88 per cent were minors, 32 per 
cent were between the ages of twenty-one and sixty, and 28.82 per cent were sixty 
or over. The ages of 1.3 per cent were unknown. Sexes differ slightly, males 
rating 48.30 per cent and females 51.70 per cent. 

The number of colored persons was very small, totaling only 2.11 per cent. 

By reason of thoroughgoing classification in the care of defectives, the per- 
centage of those mentally deficient persons still cared for as poor relief cases is 
exceedingly small, and tends always to decrease. The mental condition of all 
the cases analyzed shows that 99.82 per cent were sane, .09 per cent were insane, 
.07 per cent were idiotic and .02 per cent were epileptic. 



Pt. III. 137 

It is of further interest to view at a glance the numerical relationship to the 
whole population of the persons relieved at public expense as analyzed in Table XI, 
which exhibits the number of each class in every thousand of the population of 
the Commonwealth on a basis of the census of 1935. Thus it is shown that in each 
thousand of the population there were 37.69 indigent persons relieved at public 
expense. Of these, 18.20 were males and 19.49 were females. The native-born 
numbered 27.95 in the thousand; foreign-born, 9.43 ; native-born of foreign parent- 
age, 9.39; and those of unknown nativity, .31. The proportion of vagrants re- 
ported was 6.73 in the thousand. 

Cost of Poor Relief 

The funds laid out by the several cities and towns for all poor relief within 
their respective fiscal years are shown in Table XII. The aggregate is classified 
as "ordinary," or maintenance, and "extraordinary," or special. Together with 
the ordinary outlays are shown the receipts on account of maintenance, and the 
difference set out under "net ordinary expenditures." The ordinary outlay is 
classified as expenses in institutions and outside. The subdivision follows the 
classification in Table I regarding the nature and the place of aid. The grand 
total in Table XII shows that an aggregate of $41,371,183.34 was laid out by the 
several cities and towns. Of this sum, $41,290,337.00 was ordinary outlay, or 
maintenance; the remainder, or $80,846 .34, was expended for sundry improvements, 
mostly at the city and town infirmaries. Of the money expended for maintenance, 
$2,284,447.12 was expended for infirmary care and $1,457,581.32 for relief in other 
institutions. Care in private families took $768,206.66 and relief in the recipi- 
ents' own homes, i.e., outdoor poor relief, totaled $25,756,727.08. Five million, 
nine hundred twenty- two thousand, three hundred twenty-three dollars and 
twenty- three cents ($5,922,323.23) was expended for Old Age Assistance and 
$2,916,468.78 for aid to Mothers with Dependent Children. The cost of adminis- 
tration, including salary and office expenses of the local public welfare boards, but 
exclusive of institution administration, came to $2,184,582.81. The total receipts 
on account of ordinary expenditures were $9,231,252.26 — classified as receipts on 
account of infirmaries, $223,518.31; and all other $9,007,733.95. This latter por- 
tion of the receipts is made up mostly of reimbursements by cities and towns ulti- 
mately liable and from the state treasury in unsettled cases. Subtracting receipts 
leaves $32,059,084.74, as the net ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities and towns by Table XII is carried 
out for cases aided out of the State funds. Of the $5,453,255.26 expended for this 
purpose, $5,114,631.11 was on account of ordinary expenditures, laid out as fol- 
lows: at the State Infirmary, $280,844.72; at the State Farm, $1,320.58; at the 
Massachusetts Hospital School, $107,617.39, and all other expenditures outside 
of institutions, $4,388,666.13. Extraordinary expenditures totaled $338,624.15— 
all expended for special improvements at the several institutions just enumerated. 
Inasmuch as it is impossible to trace institution expenditures to the separate indi- 
viduals receiving the aid, the figures set out under the State tables of cost are 
arrived at by taking from net cost of maintenance that proportion which the aver- 
age number relieved in the institution bears to the average inmate population of 
the institution. 

In Table XIV State and local outlays are added, showing that of the $37,593,- 
186.34 expended for public poor relief, $37,173,715.85 was for ordinary outlays, of 
which $4,119,519.11 went for institutional relief and $30,869,613.93 was for relief 
outside. The total of extraordinary expenditures was $419,470.49. 



138 P.D. 17. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 1935. 











For All Other Reasons 








On Account 
























CITIES AND TOWNS 


Aggregate 


of 




In In- 


In Other 


In 


In 






Unem- 


Total 


firmaries 


Institu- 


Private 


Own 






ployment 






tions 


Families 


Homes 


Abington 


799 


597 


202 


7 




53 


142 


Acton 






184 


90 


94 


— 


4 


9 


81 


Acushnet 






363 


296 


67 


— 


10 


12 


45 


Adams 






1,084 


792 


292 


40 


— 


47 


205 


Agawam 






1,040 


939 


101 


- 


1 


19 


81 


Alford . 






4 


— 


4 


— 


— 


3 


1 


Amesbury 






2,071 


1,897 


174 


23 


1 


3 


147 


Amherst 






522 


234 


288 


— 


2 


25 


261 


Andover 






336 


193 


143 


15 


2 


38 


88 


Arlington 






1,945 


1,410 


535 


- 


- 


73 


462 


Ashburnham * 






293 


169 


124 


2 


2 


14 


106 


Ashby 






72 


24 


48 


— 


1 


4 


43 


Ashfield . 






41 


22 


19 


— 


— 


4 


15 


Ashland . 






117 


32 


85 


2 


4 


16 


63 


Athol 






1,631 


1,089 


542 


21 


20 


16 


485 


Attleboro 






1,256 


790 


466 


17 


2 


90 


357 


Auburn l 






422 


333 


89 


1 


2 


27 


59 


Avon 






301 


170 


131 


- 


- 


8 


123 


Ayer 






359 


284 


75 


7 


— 


14 


54 


Barnstable 






1,485 


933 


552 


16 


5 


35 


496 


Barre 






90 


68 


22 


— 


— 


8 


14 


Becket . 






86 


32 


54 


— 


— 


6 


48 


Bedford . 






156 


103 


53 


- 


2 


6 


45 


Belchertown 






210 


157 


53 


— 


— 


11 


42 


Bellingham 






254 


175 


79 


- 


3 


25 


51 


Belmont 






834 


602 


232 


— 


6 


51 


175 


Berkeley 






86 


- 


86 


- 


— 


5 


81 


Berlin^ . 






107 


83 


24 


1 


— 


11 


12 


Bernardston 






92 


31 


61 


— 


2 


7 


52 


Beverly . 






2,069 


1,648 


421 


49 


6 


84 


282 


Billerica . 






645 


514 


131 


4 


— 


18 


109 


Blackstone 






730 


628 


102 


— 


— 


16 


86 


Blandford 






31 


3 


28 


— 


— 


3 


25 


Bolton . 






70 


— 


70 


— 


2 


1 


67 


Boston . 






128,681 


93,157 


35,524 


2,184 


99 


3,062 


30,179 


Bourne . 






468 


304 


164 


— 


2 


7 


155 


Boxborough 






12 


- 


12 


- 


3 


- 


9 


B oxford . 






101 


84 


17 


— 


1 


4 


12 


Boy Is ton 1 






92 


13 


79 


— 


5 


2 


72 


Braintree 






1,079 


762 


317 


21 


1 


121 


174 


Brewster 






68 


10 


58 


— 


— 


5 


53 


Bridgewater 






768 


517 


251 


10 


3 


32 


206 


Brimfield 






45 


8 


37 


— 


— 


3 


34 


Brockton 






8,032 


2,845 


5,187 


271 


28 


216 


4,672 


Brookfield 1 






63 


34 


29 


1 


2 


13 


13 


Brookline 






2,214 


1,333 


881 


22 


12 


127 


720 


Buckland 






100 


61 


39 


— 


1 


21 


17 


Burlington 






146 


47 


99 


- 


— 


9 


90 


Cambridge 






14,836 


8,890 


5,946 


215 


1,662 


231 


3,838 


Canton . 






798 


459 


339 


— 


— 


36 


303 


Carlisle . 






11 


— 


11 


— 


— 


2 


9 


Carver . 






179 


162 


17 


— 


— 


7 


10 


Charlemont 






34 


- 


34 


- 


- 


4 


30 


Charlton* 






186 


156 


30 


2 


— 


8 


20 


Chatham 






288 


246 


42 


— 


— 


9 


33 


Chelmsford 






593 


373 


220 


5 


3 


34 


178 


Chelsea . 






11,266 


8,197 


3,069 


- 


289 


89 


2,691 


Cheshire 






128 


66 


62 


i — 


— 


19 


43 


Chester . 






253 


208 


45 


— 


1 


1 


43 


Chesterfield 






52 


26 


26 


— 


1 


2 


23 


Chicopee 






7,054 


4,672 


2,382 


68 


36 


45 


2,233 


Chilmark 






21 


— 


21 


— 


— 


4 


17 


Clarksburg 






103 


48 


55 


— 


— 


6 


49 


Clinton . 






2,578 


2,230 


348 


21 


— 


50 


277 


Cohasset 






501 


363 


138 


5 


— 


4 


129 


Colrain . 






80 


35 


45 


— 


9 


9 


27 


Concord . 






447 


328 


119 


5 


— 


22 


92 


Conway . 






59 


15 


44 


— 


1 


14 


29 


Cummington . 






51 


36 


15 


— 


— 


4 


11 


Dalton . 






638 


516 


122 


— 


1 


29 


92 


Dana 1 






23 


* 


23 


— 


— 


1 


22 


Dan vers . 






601 


120 


481 


— 


4 


81 


396 


Dartmouth 






1,707 


1,560 


147 


16 


— 


29 


102 


Dedham 






2,201 


1,987 


234 


29 


2 


42 


141 


Deer field 






327 


217 


110 


1 


2 


24 


83 


Dennis . 






358 


254 


104 


— 


2 


25 


77 


Dighton . 






368 


215 


153 


— 


~ 


16 


137 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



♦Included in total. 



Pt. III. 139 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 1 935 — Continued. 











For All Other Reasons 








On Account 
of 












CITIES AND TOWNS 


Aggregate 




In In- 


In Other 


In 


In 






Unem- 


Total 


firmaries 


Institu- 


Private 


Own 






ployment 






tions 


Families 


Homes 


Douglas . 


94 


29 


65 


4 


7 


11 


43 


Dover 






30 


23 


7 


1 


— 


1 


5 


Dracut . 






722 


529 


193 


1 


2 


8 


182 


Dudley . 






353 


145 


208 


6 


— 


9 


193 


Dunstable 






7 


— 


7 


— 


— 


1 


6 


Duxbury 






348 


233 


115 


5 


- 


23 


87 


East Bridgewater 




544 


351 


193 


3 


2 


25 


163 


East Brookfieldi 




118 


75 


43 


3 


— 


4 


36 


East Longmeadow 




607 


292 


315 


- 


3 


20 


292 


Eastham 




30 


8 


22 


— 


— 


9 


13 


Easthampton 






2,219 


1,951 


268 


30 


6 


20 


212 


Easton . 






533 


215 


318 


6 


— 


16 


296 


Edgartown 






171 


125 


46 


— 


— 


12 


34 


Egremont 






23 


- 


23 


— 


- 


7 


16 


Enfield . 






40 


30 


10 


— 


— 


3 


7 


Erving . 






151 


93 


58 


- 


1 


18 


39 


Essex 






104 


55 


49 


— 


2 


3 


44 


Everett . 






7,126 


5,765 


1,361 


- 


24 


77 


1,260 


Fairhaven 






1,948 


1,512 


436 


17 


1 


51 


367 


Fall River 






23,178 


20,364 


2,814 


358 


117 


421 


1,918 


Falmouth 






1,838 


1,470 


368 


14 


23 


46 


285 


Fitchburg 






7,643 


2,210 


5,433 


86 


179 


143 


5,025 


Florida . 






19 


11 


8 


— 


— 


5 


3 


Foxborough 






386 


159 


227 


- 


2 


13 


212 


Framingham 






3,103 


2,649 


454 


— 


— 


93 


361 


Franklin 






623 


423 


200 


17 


4 


15 


164 


Freetown 






172 


100 


72 


_ 


3 


11 


58 


Gardner . 






2,216 


1,775 


441 


58 


16 


69 


298 


Gay Head 






4 


— 


4 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Georgetown 






271 


183 


88 


— 


1 


19 


68 


Gill 






95 


44 


51 


— 


— 


10 


41 


Gloucester 






3,296 


2,189 


1,107 


94 


1 


57 


955 


Goshen . 






8 


— 


8 


— 


— 


1 


7 


Gosnold . 






— 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


Grafton . 






521 


289 


232 


14 


2 


23 


193 


Granby . 






44 


* 


44 


2 


— 


3 


39 


Granville 






50 


18 


32 


— 


3 


3 


26 


Great Barringt 


on 




1,049 


458 


591 


- 


3 


44 


544 


Greenfield 






1,742 


941 


801 


31 


— 


56 


714 


Greenwich 






3 


_ 


3 


- 


— 


3 


— 


Groton 1 . 






253 


200 


53 


_ 


5 


11 


37 


Groveland 






239 


171 


68 


_ 


2 


20 


46 


Hadley . 






164 




164 


— 


1 


6 


157 


Halifax . 






107 


74 


33 


1 


— 


7 


25 


Hamilton 






179 


56 


123 


4 


5 


16 


98 


Hampdeo 






33 


11 


22 


1 




6 


15 


Hancock 






40 


25 


15 


— 


— 


8 


7 


Hanover 






425 


223 


202 


12 


1 


18 


171 


Hanson . 






482 


369 


113 


6 


1 


17 


89 


Hardwick 1 






341 


269 


72 


9 


— 


9 


54 


Harvard 






53 


32 


21 


— 


1 


5 


15 


Harwich 






458 


239 


219 


4 


2 


10 


203 


Hatfield . 






224 


186 


38 


_ 


2 


9 


27 


Haverhill 






13,439 


9,006 


4,433 


209 


1,482 


206 


2,536 


Hawley . 






10 


— 


10 


— 


2 


2 


6 


Heath . 






10 


2 


8 


— 


— 


5 


3 


Hingham 






717 


284 


433 


11 


3 


26 


393 


Hinsdale 






230 


190 


40 


_ 


— 


2 


38 


Holbrook 






83 


_ 


83 


— 


— 


24 


59 


Holdeni . 






258 


122 


136 


1 


— 


8 


127 


Holland^ 






17 


— 


17 


— 


— 


— 


17 


Holliston 






181 


128 


53 


_ 


- 


16 


37 


Holyoke . 






5,115 


3,772 


1,343 


315 


4 


118 


906 


Hopedale 






132 


36 


96 


— 


— 


32 


64 


Hopkinton 
Hubbardston 1 . 






232 


103 


129 


— 


— 


20 


109 






127 


79 


48 


_ 


_ 


8 


40 


Hudson . 






1,308 


282 


1,026 


11 


10 


27 


978 


Hull , . 






225 


115 


110 


1 


— 


16 


93 


Huntington 






99 


77 


22 


— 


— 


2 


20 


Ipswich . 






850 


— 


850 


7 


1 


24 


818 


Kingston 






219 


150 


69 


— 


1 


13 


55 


Lakeville 






57 


23 


34 


— 


— 


9 


25 


Lancaster 






226 


28 


198 


6 


1 


13 


178 


Lanesborough . 






99 


70 


29 


- 


- 


11 


18 


Lawrence 






11,733 


9,407 


2,326 


1,193 


8 


250 


875 


Lee 






543 


341 


202 


— 


3 


18 


181 


Leicester 1 




618 


345 


273 


5 


1 


25 


242 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



♦Included in total. 



140 P.D. 17. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 81, 1985 — Continued. 











For All Other Reasons 








On Account 
of 












CITIES AND TOWNS 


Aggregate 




Inln- 


[n Other 


In 


In 






Unem- 


Total firmaries 


Institu- 


Private 


Own 






ployment 






tions 


Families 


Homes 


Lenox .... 


359 


154 


205 






7 


198 


Leominster 


4,359 


3,833 


526 


49 


- 


108 


369 


Leverett 


56 


20 


36 


2 


— 


14 


20 


Lexington 


824 


606 


218 


— 


5 


55 


158 


Leyden .... 


4 


— 


4 


— 


— 


4 


— 


Lincoln .... 


42 


— 


42 


— 


18 


6 


18 


Littleton 


46 


16 


30 


_ 


_ 


2 


28 


Longmeadow . 


152 


40 


112 


_ 


7 


17 


88 


Lowell .... 


19,414 


15,295 


4,119 


814 


286 


361 


2,658 


Ludlow . . . . 


1,28.5 


901 


384 


1 


4 


44 


335 


Lunenburg 


114 


50 


64 


— 


— 


17 


47 


Lynn .... 


17,443 


13,663 


3,780 


214 


- 


584 


2,982 


Lynnfield 


159 


101 


58 


— 


2 


13 


43 


Maiden .... 


5,342 


4,155 


1,187 


112 


112 


137 


826 


Manchester 


304 


230 


74 


4 


— 


8 


62 


Mansfield 


476 


182 


294 


9 


— 


16 


269 


Marblehead 


796 


547 


249 


18 


_ 


64 


167 


Marion . . . . 


442 


373 


69 


1 


2 


16 


50 


Marlborough . 


1,611 


1,300 


311 


38 


4 


76 


193 


Marshfield 


412 


171 


241 


10 


3 


13 


215 


Mashpee 


79 


31 


48 


- 


- ' 


12 


36 


Mattapoisett . 


283 


119 


164 


— 


5 


5 


154 


Maynard 


779 


604 


175 


9 


2 


28 


136 


Medfield 


99 


20 


79 


— 


3 


7 


69 


Medford 


5,037 


3,778 


1,259 


49 


4 


162 


1,044 


Medway 


181 


96 


85 


— 


1 


14 


70 


Melrose .... 


645 


145 


500 


— 


— 


143 


357 


Mendon .... 


82 


53 


29 


— 


— 


6 


23 


Merrimac 


457 


414 


43 


— 


2 


12 


29 


Methuen 


2,716 


2,390 


326 


25 


— 


62 


239 


Middleborough 


1,061 


712 


349 


41 


9 


69 


230 


Middlefield . 


11 


— 


11 


— 


— 


— 


11 


Middleton 


205 


97 


108 


— 


— 


13 


95 


Milford . . . . 


1,477 


930 


547 


73 


8 


46 


420 


Millbury 1 . . 


792 


352 


440 


9 


1 


19 


411 


Millis 


155 


120 


35 


— 


— 


11 


24 


Millville . . . 


178 


107 


71 


1 


2 


8 


60 


Milton . 


387 


137 


250 


4 


7 


46 


193 


Monroe . . . . 


14 


_ 


14 


— 


— 


1 


13 


Monson . 


206 


78 


128 


6 


- 


3 


119 


Montague 


1,384 


853 


531. 


15 


4 


37 


475 


Monterey 


13 


4 


9 


— 


1 


6 


2 


Montgomery . 


3 


— 


3 


— 


— 


1 


2 


Mount Washington . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Nahant . . . . 


89 


60 


29 


— 


— 


9 


20 


Nantucket 


752 


656 


96 


8 


— 


23 


65 


Natick . . . . 


1,498 


748 


750 


41 


9 


92 


608 


Needham 


767 


260 


507 


2 


1 


38 


466 


New Ashford . 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


New Bedford . 


13,290 


11,316 


1,974 


425 


70 


427 


1,052 


New Braintree 1 


13 


— 


13 


— 


— 


3 


10 


New Marlborough . 


28 


- 


28 


- 


- 


6 


22 


New Salejn 


41 


11 


30 


— 


— 


2 


28 


Newbury 


115 


44 


71 


— 


— 


7 


64 


Newburyport . 


2,326 


1,707 


619 


45 


4 


24 


546 


Newton . . . . 


6,381 


5,504 


877 


27 


1 


28 


821 


Norfolk . 


38 


— 


38 


— 


— 


2 


36 


North Adams . 


3,279 


2,434 


845 


53 


140 


76 


576 


North Andover 


555 


429 


126 


6 


3 


18 


99 


North Attleborough 


983 


623 


360 


33 


7 


35 


285 


North Brookfield 


293 


239 


54 


6 


— 


13 


35 


North Reading 


167 


109 


58 


- 


4 


6 


48 


Northampton ". 


2,962 


1,349 


1,613 


82 


15 


71 


1,445 


Northborough . 


155 


100 


55 


— 


3 


14 


38 


Northbridge . 


1,490 


958 


532 


41 


3 


12 


476 


Northfield 


128 


81 


47 


— 


— 


8 


39 


Norton . 


206 


* 


206 


— 


— 


25 


181 


Norwell . 


174 


140 


34 


4 


2 


8 


20 


Norwood 


726 


474 


252 


1 


11 


59 


181 


Oak Bluffs 


308 


163 


145 


— 


2 


7 


136 


Oakham 1 


2 


— 


2 


1 


— 


— 


1 


Orange . 


681 


537 


144 


1 


2 


49 


92 


Orleans . 


158 


113 


45 


— 


— 


4 


41 


Otis 


25 


— 


25 


— 


— 


4 


21 


Oxford . ... 


560 


266 


294 


7 


6 


22 


259 


Palmer . 


740 


662 


78 


11 


9 


17 


41 


Paxton 1 . 


32 


19 


13 


" 


2 


3 


8 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



♦Included in total. 



Pt. III. 141 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 81, 1935 — Continued. 











For All Other Reasons 








On Account 
of 












CITIES AND TOWNS 


Aggregate 




In In- 


In Other 


In 


In 






Unem- 


Total 


firmaries 


Institu- 


Private 


Own 






ployment 






tions 


Families 


Homes 


Peabody 


2,105 


275 


1,830 


88 


54 


52 


1,636 


Pelham . 






106 


38 


68 


— 


1 


6 


61 


Pembroke 






113 


48 


65 


1 


1 


9 


54 


Pepperell 






265 


93 


172 


3 


- 


7 


162 


Peru 






27 


26 


1 


— 


— 


1 


— 


Petersham 






56 


36 


20 


_ 


1 


6 


13 


Phillipston 






83 


66 


17 


- 


- 


9 


8 


Pittsfield 






9,433 


8,836 


597 


143 


1 


193 


260 


Plainfield 






5 


— 


5 


_ 


_ 


1 


4 


Plainville 






176 


115 


61 


1 


1 


16 


43 


Plymouth 






2,111 


1,784 


327 


15 


- 


77 


235 


Plympton 






59 


37 


22 


— 


— 


2 


20 


Prescott . 






1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Princeton 1 






115 


55 


60 


_ 


_ 


4 


56 


Provincetown 






123 




123 


12 


1 


6 


104 


Quincy . 






6,157 


4,285 


1,872 


59 


47 


269 


1,497 


Randolph 






966 


759 


207 


12 


1 


47 


147 


Raynham 






196 


43 


153 


— 


— 


9 


144 


Reading . 






1,319 


823 


496 


— 


3 


60 


433 


Rehoboth 






267 


102 


165 


— 


1 


7 


157 


Revere . 






5,358 


4,439 


919 


_ 


10 


101 


808 


Richmond 






38 


4 


34 


_ 


2 


2 


30 


Rochester 






80 


40 


40 


_ 


2 


4 


34 


Rockland 






1,320 


1,152 


168 


23 


— 


48 


97 


Rockport 






534 


242 


292 


10 


— 


14 


268 


Rowe _ . 






46 


17 


29 


— 


— 


8 


21 


Rowley' . 






171 


103 


68 


— 


— 


7 


61 


Royalston 






157 


103 


54 


— 


1 


3 


50 


Russell . 






155 


121 


34 


— 


— 


12 


22 


Rutland 1 






41 


4 


37 


3 


1 


5 


28 


Salem 






7,256 


1,298 


5,958 


129 


689 


163 


4,977 


Salisbury 






599 


575 


24 


— 


— 


3 


21 


Sandisfield 






27 


18 


9 


— 


— 


4 


5 


Sandwich 






97 


35 


62 


- 


5 


7 


50 


Saugus . 






1,529 


439 


1,090 


15 


30 


95 


950 


Savoy 






11 


8 


3 


— 


— 


1 


2 


Scituate . 






441 


137 


304 


— 


1 


36 


267 


Seekonk . 






533 


448 


85 


— 


1 


6 


78 


Sharon . 






478 


359 


119 


— 


— 


19 


100 


Sheffield . 






248 


214 


34 


_ 


_ 


9 


25 


Shelburne 






65 


12 


53 


_ 


_ 


5 


48 


Sherborn 






71 


34 


37 


- 


1 


7 


29 


Shirley . 






360 


157 


203 


— 


11 


17 


175 


Shrewsbury 






913 


791 


122 


- 


3 


25 


94 


Shutesbury 






15 


— 


15 


2 


1 


— 


12 


Somerset 






1,219 


1,098 


121 


— 


1 


36 


84 


Somerville 






12,532 


7,769 


4,763 


86 


883 


332 


3,462 


South Hadley 






775 


298 


477 


12 


— 


23 


442 


Southampton 






46 


5 


41 


— 


2 


3 


36 


Southborough 






225 


100 


125 


- 


- 


14 


111 


Southbridge 






1,224 


873 


351 


31 


1 


26 


293 


South wick 






286 


77 


209 


— 


— 


33 


176 


Spencer . 






343 


197 


146 


19 


6 


25 


96 


Springfield 






24,432 


22,108 


2,324 


312 


17 


361 


1,634 


Sterling 1 






98 


35 


63 


— 


2 


8 


53 


Stockbridge 






164 


140 


24 


— 


1 


10 


13 


Stoneham 






1,049 


859 


190 


21 


5 


51 


113 


Stoughton 






571 


194 


377 


11 


1 


64 


301 


Stow 






87 


56 


31 


3 


— 


7 


21 


Sturbridge 






200 


69 


131 


9 


3 


4 


115 


Sudbury 






153 


125 


28 


— 


1 


3 


24 


Sunderland 






169 


98 


71 


— 


— 


1 


70 


Sutton . 






334 


132 


202 


6 


4 


11 


181 


Swampscott 






638 


493 


145 


- 


8 


15 


122 


Swansea . 






465 


296 


169 


— 


— 


14 


155 


Taunton 






5,815 


4,962 


853 


113 


4 


124 


612 


Templeton 






574 


409 


165 


— 


— 


13 


152 


Tewksbury 






201 


141 


60 


— 


2 


6 


52 


Tisbury . 






283 


171 


112 


— 


1 


21 


90 


Tolland . 






1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


Topsfield 






45 


18 


27 


2 


2 


12 


11 


Townsend 






140 


24 


116 


6 


4 


7 


99 


Truro 






13 




13 




1 


1 


11 


Tyngsborough 






236 


200 


36 


_ 


- 


1 


35 


Tyringham 






9 


— 


9 


— 


— 


4 


5 


Upton 






220 


150 


70 


7 


— 


1 


62 


Uxbridge 






908 


118 


790 


29 


— 


21 


740 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



142 P.D. 17. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March SI, 1935 — Concluded. 











For All Other Reasons 








On Account 
of 












CITIES AND TOWNS 


Aggregate 




In In- 


In Other 


In 


In 






Unem- 


Total 


firmaries 


Institu- 


Private 


Own 






ployment 






tions 


Families 


Homes 


Wakefield 


2,175 


1,892 


283 


35 




21 


227 


Wales . 






20 


— 


20 


_ 


_ 


2 


18 


Walpole . 






296 


185 


111 


_ 


1 


25 


85 


Waltham 






4,576 


2,854 


1,722 


86 


42 


151 


1,443 


Ware 




. 


1,024 


901 


123 


11 


— 


13 


99 


Wareham 




. 


1,521 


1,081 


440 


7 


- 


30 


403 


Warren 1 . 




. 


345 


91 


254 


9 


6 


9 


230 


Warwick 






36 


10 


26 


_ 


1 


2 


23 


Washington 






14 


— 


14 


_ 


_ 


3 


11 


Watertown 






2,850 


2,187 


663 


33 


1 


69 


560 


Wayland 

Webster . 






314 


* 


314 


_ 


_ 


15 


299 






1,642 


967 


675 


39 


- 


39 


597 


Wellesley 






299 


89 


210 


— 


— 


36 


174 


Wellfleet 






84 


59 


25 


_ 


1 


9 


15 


Wendell 






165 


24 


141 


- 


6 


1 


134 


Wenham 






17 


— 


17 


— 


— 


4 


13 


West Boylstoni 




96 


48 


48 


2 


- 


10 


36 


West Bridgewater 




181 


51 


130 


3 


1 


19 


107 


West Brookfield 




137 


39 


98 


3 


— 


9 


86 


West Newbury 




171 


121 


50 


- 


- 


11 


39 


West Springfield 




2,441 


2,144 


297 


2 


5 


1.19 


171 


West Stockbridge 




61 


35 


26 


— 


— 


6 


20 


West Tisbury . 




8 


- 


8 


— 


2 


3 


3 


Westborough 






333 


87 


246 


12 


2 


26 


206 


Westfield 






2,397 


2,067 


330 


49 


29 


42 


210 


Westford 






381 


274 


107 


10 


— 


9 


88 


Westhampton 






41 


11 


30 


1 


— 


3 


26 


Westminster 1 






136 


75 


61 


2 


1 


10 


48 


Weston . 






120 


85 


35 


— 


2 


5 


28 


Westport 






553 


137 


416 


7 


21 


13 


375 


Westwood 






350 


321 


29 


— 


1 


12 


16 


Weymouth 






2,981 


2,171 


810 


28 


3 


165 


614 


Whately 






123 


52 


71 


— 


1 


5 


65 


Whitman 






827 


439 


388 


— 


1 


59 


328 


Wilbraham 






433 


154 


279 


— 


4 


13 


262 


Williamsburg 






159 


89 


70 


— 


— 


10 


60 


Willi amstown 






414 


208 


206 


— 


— 


16 


190 


Wilmington 






296 


244 


52 


1 


4 


5 


42 


Winchendon 






2,007 


1,091 


916 


28 


15 


64 


809 


Winchester 






457 


16 


441 


1 


6 


55 


379 


Windsor . 






47 


32 


15 


— 


— 


4 


11 


Winthrop 






737 


396 


341 


1 


32 


71 


237 


Woburn . 






3,513 


2,998 


515 


38 


— 


66 


411 


Worcester 2 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Worthington 






16 


- 


16 


- 


- 


2 


14 


Wrentham 






116 


60 


56 


8 


1 


7 


40 


Yarmouth 






423 


344 


79 


- 


- 


21 


58 


Total 


550,211 


391,215 


158,996 


9,524 


6,980 


14,911 


127,581 


In State Institutions 




4,986 


— 


4,986 


— 


4,986 


— 


— 


Aggregate 




555,197 


391,215 


163,982 


9,524 


11,966 


14,911 


127,581 



1 Charlton Home Farm Associ ation. 



2 Not received in time for tabulation. 



*Included in total. 



Part III. 143 

Table II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the State in Insti- 
tutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes, during the Year ending 
March 31, 1935* 

Aggregate 35,402 

In institutions: 

Total 6,828 

State Infirmary 4,461 

Infirmary Ward, State Farm 8 

Massachusetts Hospital School 517 

Town or City Infirmary 398 

Other institutions ........... 1,444 

Outside: 

Total 28,574 

Private families ........... 1,292 

Own homes 27,282 



Table III. — Movement during the Year ending March 31, 1935, of the Poor Sup- 
ported or Relieved* 

Number supported or relieved April 1, 1934 126,437 

Number admitted to support or relief during the year ....... 37,545 

Total supported or relieved during the year ending March 31, 1935 ..... 163,982 

Number discharged from aid during the year ......... 52,596 

Died 4,222 

Discharged 45,920 

Transferred 2,454 

Number remaining April 1, 1935 111,386 



Table IV. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year end- 
ing March 31, 1935, classified by Color, Nativity and Sex* 



Aggregate 

Male 

Female 
White . 

Native: 
Total 
Male 
Female 

Foreign: 
Total 
Male 
Female 

Unknown: 
Total 
Male 
Female 
Colored 

Native: 
Total 
Male 
Female 

Foreign: 
Total 
Male 
Female 

Unknown: 
Total 
Male 
Female 



Source of Relief 



Cities 

and 

Towns 


State 


Total 


128,580 
61,100 
67,480 

126,091 


35,402 
18,104 
17,298 
34,432 


163,982 
79,204 
84,778 

160,523 


94,036 
45,500 
48,536 


24,596 
12,453 
12,143 


118,632 
57,953 
60,679 


31,194 
14,114 
17,080 


9,384 
4,955 
4,429 


40,578 
19,069 
21,509 


861 

399 

462 

2,489 


452 
253 
199 
970 


1,313 
652 
661 

3,459 


2,129 

931 

1,198 


841 
379 

462 


2,970 
1,310 
1,660 


334 
145 
189 


124 
62 
62 


458 
207 
251 


26 
11 
15 


5 
2 
3 


31 
13 

18 



Table V. — Number of Native-born Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during 
the Year ending March 31, 1935, classified by Parent Nativity* 



Source of Relief 



Total native born 
Parents: 
Native . 
Foreign . 
Mixed 
Unknown 



* Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment 




Cities 

and 

Towns 

96,165 



State 



Total 



25,437 121,602 



38,139 9,958 48,097 

32,462 8,409 40,871 

17,530 5,319 22,849 

8,034 1,751 9,785 



144 P.D. 17. 

Table VI. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year end- 
ing March 31, 1935, classified by Present Age* 



Cities 

Source op Relief and 

Towns 

Aggregate ' 128,580 

Under 5 5,447 

5 to 9 11,539 

10 to 14 14,794 

15 to 19 13,401 

20 to 24 7,406 

25 to 29 4,752 

30 to 34 4,544 

35 to 39 4,932 

40 to 44 5,330 

45 to 49 . . . 5,193 

50 to 54 4,477 

55 to 59 4,145 

60 to 64 4,483 

65 to 69 . . . . 4,967 

70 to 74 11,091 

75 to 79 11,932 

80 to 84 5,837 

85 to 89 2,002 

90 to 94 491 

95 to 99 103 

100 and over .......... 26 

Unknown 1,688 



State 



Total 



35,402 


163,982 


1,938 


7,385 


3,667 


15,206 


4,590 


19,384 


3,984 


17,385 


2,267 


9,673 


1,658 


6,410 


1,890 


6,434 


1,991 


6,923 


1,987 


7,317 


1,784 


6,977 


1,491 


5,968 


1,386 


5,531 


1,257 


5,740 


1,276 


6,243 


1,517 


12,608 


1,321 


13,253 


638 


6,475 


232 


2,234 


69 


560 


10 


113 


4 


30 


445 


f.133 



Table VII. — Number of Mentally Impaired Persons Supported or Relieved as 
Poor Persons during the Year ending March 31, 1935, classified by Mental De- 
fect and by Sex* 



Cities 

Source of Relief and 

Towns 

Aggregate . . . 257 

Male ... . 153 

Female 104 

Insane: 

Total . ... . . . . . . . 137 

Male . 86 

Female 51 

Idiotic: 

Total 89 

Male 48 

Female 41 

Epileptic: 

Total 31 

Male . 19 

Female 12 



State 



Total 



33 


290 


21 


174 


12 


116 


13 


150 


9 


95 


4 


55 


14 


103 


7 


55 


7 


48 


6 


37 


5 


24 


1 


13 



Table VIII. — Number of Poor Persons Discharged from Support or Relief during 
the Year ending March 31, 1935, classified by Character of Discharge and Sex* 



Source of Relief 



Cities 

and 

Towns 

Aggregate 39,135 

Male 19,767 

Female 19,368 

To care of relatives and friends: 

Total . 12,192 

Male 6,193 

Female 5,999 

To other institutions: 

Total 1,503 

Male . 761 

Female 742 

To care of self: 

Total 21,874 

Male 10,814 

Female 11,060 

Died: 

Total 3,566 

Male 1,999 

Female 1,567 

* Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment. 



State 

13,461 
7,612 
5,849 

4,036 
2,045 
1,991 

951 

466 
485 

7,818 
4,636 
3,182 

656 
465 
191 



Total 

52,596 
27,379 
25,217 

16,228 
8,238 
7,990 

2,454 
1,227 
1,227 

29,692 
15,450 
14,242 

4,222 
2,464 
1,758 



Part III. 145 

Table IX. — Number of Foreign-born Persons who Received Public Relief during 
the Year ending March 81, 1935, classified by Countries of Birth* 



Source of Relief 



Total foreign-born . 
Number born in: 

Canada . 

England and Wales 

Germany 

Ireland . 

Italy 

Russia and Poland 

Scandinavia 

Scotland 

Other countries 



Cities 






and 


State 


Total 


Towns 






31,528 


9,508 


41,036 


9,524 


2,943 


12,467 


2,703 


513 


3,216 


559 


101 


660 


6,079 


1,657 


7,736 


4,053 


1,355 


5,408 


3,037 


1,001 


4,038 


788 


185 


973 


687 


197 


884 


4,098 


1,556 


5,654 



Table X. — Percentage of the Various Classes of Persons Relieved at Public Ex- 
pense during the Year ending March 31, 1935, to the Whole Number so 
relieved* 



Source of Relief 



Total number of persons relieved* 
Percentage: 

Local .... 

State .... 

Place of Relief: 
In Institutions: 
Total 
Infirmaries 
Other institutions 
State institutions 
Outside: 
Total 

Private families 
Own homes 
Age: 

20 and under 

21 to 59 . 
60 and over 
Unknown . 

Sex: 

Male 

Female 
Color: 

White 

Colored 
Mental Condition: 



Insane 
Idiotic 
Epileptic 



163,982 

78.41 
21.59 



13.11 
4.26 
5.81 
3.04 



9.09 
77.80 

37.88 

32.00 

28.82 

1.30 

48.30 
51.70 

97.89 
2.11 

99.82 
.09 
.07 
.02 



Table XI. — Numerical Relation to the Whole Population of the Several Classes 
of Persons Relieved at Public Expense during the Year ending March 31, 1935i 



Population, 1935 .... 
Number per 1,000 of Population: 

Of all Persons Relievedt 

Of Males 

Of Females .... 

Of Native Born .... 

Of Foreign Born 

Of Native Born of Foreign Parentage 

Of Unknown Birth 

Of Vagrants .... 

* Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment 
t Excluding persons relieved by reason of unemployment 



4,350,910 



37.69 

18.20 

19.49 

27.95 

9.43 

9.39 

.31 

6.73 



89.92. 



146 



P.D. 17. 
Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poor 

In most cases the reports are for the 









Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinary 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




OUTSIDE 




TOWNS 


Expenditures 


















In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


1 


Abington . . . $60,189 95 


$60,189 95 


$1,248 00 


$3,167 06 


$1,180 25 


$31,051 81 


2 


Acton 




10,994 34 


10,994 34 


- 


204 72 


445 65 


5,035 97 


3 


Acushnet . 




16,765 82 


16,765 82 


— 


3,641 85 


638 00 


9,156 74 


4 


Adams 




58,679 97 


58,679 97 


8,250 00 


2,655 51 


2,518 23 


22,515 21 


5 


Agawam . 




69,148 25 


69,148 25 


- 


- 


3,261 25 


51,505 69 


6 


Alford 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Amesbury . 




79,706 10 


79,706 10 


7,101 84 


2,746 37 


- 


41,946 65 


8 


Amherst . 




22,864 43 


22,864 43 


- 


763 08 


1,355 71 


8,804 38 


9 


Andover . 




35,243 95 


35,243 95 


7,826 48 


2,230 10 


1,236 59 


4,859 98 


10 


Arlington . 




178,116 21 


178,116 21 


- 


8,436 83 


6,649 72 


120,002 53 


11 


Ashburnham x 




19,512 77 


19,512 77 


625 88 


2,357 44 


- 


11,890 66 


12 


Ashby 




8,108 96 


8,108 96 


- 


444 50 


601 00 


3,230 92 


13 


Ashfield 




2,451 59 


2,451 59 


— 


- 


478 21 


656 88 


14 


Ashland 




12,364 81 


12,364 81 


- 


1,303 21 


1,993 58 


5,450 20 


15 


Athol 




80,256 14 


80,256 14 


7,920 49 


2,214 59 


1,859 00 


42,317 84 


16 


Attleboro . 




171,632 80 


171,632 80 


7,713 95 


5,651 50 


2,013 00 


109,700 05 


17 


Auburn * . 




34,085 39 


30,504 97 


313 80 


4,106 45 


1,878 33 


13,757 79 


18 


Avon 




18,578 52 


18,578 52 


- 


- 


- 


11,290 19 


19 


Ayer 




18,566 65 


18,566 65 


3,318 43 


65 71 


- 


7,779 14 


20 


Barnstable 




108,961 41 


106,421 16 


6,133 53 


3,836 64 


4,116 50 


65,925 74 


21 


Barre 




19,888 86 


19,888 86 


3,016 92 


1,928 45 


1,080 59 


7,344 74 


22 


Becket 




10,404 24 


10,404 24 


— 


- 


156 00 


6,400 96 


23 


Bedford . 




8,523 74 


8,523 74 


— 


- 


365 00 


4,418 86 


24 


Belchertown 




11,043 96 


11,043 96 


— 


688 08 


1,436 98 


4,791 49 


25 


Bellingham 




24,697 35 


24,348 47 


213 69 


2,562 53 


2,636 85 


9,518 99 


26 


Belmont . 




52,775 90 


52,775 90 


— 


1,771 09 


3,126 30 


24,626 00 


27 


Berkley 




5,505 00 


5,505 00 


295 20 


105 00 


— 


2,743 99 


28 


Berlin l 




5,394 50 


5,394 50 


- 


407 75 


561 43 


1,892 78 


29 


Bernardston 




5,660 72 


5,660 72 


- 


719 00 


208 00 


2,148 02 


30 


Beverly 




224,497 01 


224,497 01 


19,370 62 


8,877 63 


— 


141,310 82 


31 


Billerica 




48,033 53 


48,033 53 


5,390 27 


2,442 95 


1,163 83 


20,936 06 


32 


Blackstone 




24,114 84 


24,114 84 


3,570 48 


725 00 


- - 


12,948 52 


33 


Blandford . 




2,224 05 


2,224 05 


— 


— 


156 00 


830 57 


34 


Bolton 




4,826 88 


4,826 88 


- 


564 00 


259 00 


1,615 66 


35 


Boston 




14,107,783 80 


14,107,783 80 


650,994 76 


19,350 93 


253,677 22 


9,982,723 17 


36 


Bourne 




20,117 61 


20,117 61 


— 


1,190 94 


272 00 


5,086 79 


37 


Boxborough 




1,033 52 


1,033 52 


— 


418 44 


- 


355 08 


38 


Boxford 




3,603 29 


3,603 29 


— 


501 00 


473 97 


1,622 69 


39 


Boylston 1 . 




2,012 21 


2,012 21 


- 


347 15 


- 


746 58 


40 


Braintree . 




105,521 40 


105,521 40 


4,889 20 


5,893 37 


- ; 


47,491 81 


41 


Brewster . 




6,115 99 


6,115 99 


- 


— 


454 15 


1,163 83 


42 


Bridgewater 




31,475 34 


31,475 34 


4,198 61 


1,707 23 


1,547 00 


11,337 26 


43 


Brimfield . 




5,060 40 


5,060 40 


- 


— 


81 00 


3,611 71 


44 


Brockton . 




563,339 75 


563,339 75 


47,647 04 


37,587 45 


9,764 35 


332,537 13 


45 


Brookfield 1 




7,152 91 


7,152 91 


125 90 


113 11 


1,010 95 


478 46 


46 


Brookline . 




243,049 97 


243,049 97 


9,410 18 


6,239 47 


2,284 53 


162,532 16 


47 


Buckland . 




10,442 63 


10,442 63 


— 


514 23 


3,701 94 


3,550 58 


48 


Burlington 
Cambridge 




11,033 36 


11,033 36 


- 


— 


- 


8,183 45 


49 




858,288 77 


858,288 77 


60,852 37 


4,358 81 


13,7,10 56 


542,389 60 


50 


Canton 




60,481 59 


60,481 59 


- 


2,053 44 


5,755 99 


32,357 35 


51 


Carlisle 




2,788 40 


2,788 40 


— 


- 


— 


897 35 


52 


Carver 




10,164 27 


10,164 27 


— 


1,490 87 


136 44 


5,090 74 


53 


Charlemont 




5,567 46 


5,567 46 


- 


82 00 


215 68 


4,771 03 


54 


Charlton . 




11,296 93 


11,296 93 


709 37 


821 45 


- 


5,989 52 


55 


Chatham . 




17,402 21 


17,402 21 


- 


- 


420 00 


10,187 06 


56 


Chelmsford 




34,311 36 


34,311 36 


3,506 66 


1,090 61 


837 66 


19,104 18 


57 


Chelsea 




626.068 66 


626,068 66 


1,973 92 


45,523 11 


567 00 


466,130 76 


58 


Cheshire . 




16,313 85 


16,313 85 


— 


715 28 


1,950 00 


10,338 99 


59 


Chester 




13,734 57 


13,734 57 


— 


- 


— 


11,423 34 


60 


Chesterfield 




2,524 04 


2,524 04 


— 


365 00 


142 06 


300 83 


61 


Chicopee . 




402,154 66 


402,154 66 


17,839 01 


29,764 16 


3,292 94 


284,099 43 


62 


Chilmark . 




3,355 77 


3,355 77 


- 


374 26 


345 08 


337 19 


63 


Clarksburg 




6,704 03 


6,704 03 


- 


297 00 


— 


2,661 39 


64 


Clinton 




141,469 31 


140,328 30 


9,097 51 


5,333 35 


9,756 83 


91,578 44 


65 


Cohasset . 




33,088 08 


33,088 08 


3,707 54 


1,443 54 


585 00 


18,539 57 


66 


Colrain 




5,258 91 


5,258 91 


— 


890 46 


978 00 


1,941 57 


67 


Concord . 




36,585 86 


36,585 86 


5,138 88 


- 


994 84 


18,640 22 


68 


Conway 
Cummington 




6,421 92 


6,421 92 


- 


794 35 


954 75 


2,162 58 


69 




2,803 42 


2,803 42 


- 


203 85 


734 68 


1,102 89 


70 


Dalton 




49,458 99 


49,458 99 


- 


2,923 02 


4,565 85 


28,317 33 


71 


Dana 




2,696 24 


2,696 24 


- 


- 


- 


1,681 04 


72 


Danvers 




64,438 31 


64,438 31 


316 00 


899 94 


4,692 45 


23,062 03 


73 


Dartmouth 




56,777 09 


56,777 09 


4,451 04 


5,407 10 


188 77 


27,784 28 


74 


Dedham . 




175,159 73 


170,054 03 


7,040 57 


3,878 72 


3,852 00 


128,632 52 


75 


Deerfield . 




19,705 99 


19,705 99 


- 


1,071 74 


11,171 58 


1,062 00 


76 


Dennis . 




31,755 50 


31,755 50 


423 61 


1,682 29 


3,495 47 


13,602 78 



■ Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 

Persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes, 
fiscal year ending December 31, 1984- 



147 



Expenditures 



Mothers' 
Aid 



Old Age 

Assistance 



Administra- 
tion 



Receipts 



On Account 

of Support or 

Relief in 

Infirmaries 



All 
Other 



Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 



Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 

Institutions 



$4,845 32 


$18,386 81 


$310 70 


_ 


$15,466 39 


$44,723 56 


416 00 


4,511 00 


381 00 


— 


3,781 11 


7,213 23 


556 62 


2,713 35 


59 26 


- 


4,990 80 


11,775 02 


8,608 44 


9,071 64 


5,060 94 


$2,538 54 


25,623 00 


30,518 43 


1,303 00 


8,949 76 


4,128 55 


- 


33,075 60 


36,072 65 


5,263 11 


18,981 36 


3,666 77 


174 40 


20,330 02 


59,201 68 


— 


9,957 68 


1,983 58 


- 


4,191 28 


18,673 15 


1,200 64 


15,871 69 


2,018 47 


199 00 


10,493 42 


24,551 53 


13,217 09 


22,101 88 


7,708 16 


- 


40,367 06 


137,749 15 


1,936 07 


2,322 98 


379 74 


- 


3,351 51 


16,161 26 


1,145 70 


2,382 00 


304 84 


- 


1,622 93 


6,486 03 


- 


1,316 50 


- 


- 


570 63 


1,880 96 


1,062 00 


2,390 42 


165 40 


- 


3,694 70 


8,670 11 


2,025 22 


19,176 07 


4,742 93 


284 25 


19,737 43 


60,234 46 


11,001 60 


26,322 61 


9,230 09 


- 


43,473 60 


128,159 20 


2,232 65 


7,219 49 


996 46 


- 


15,649 74 


14,855 23 


575 95 


6,712 38 


- 


- 


5,232 28 


13,346 24 


990 00 


6,268 71 


144 66 


55 67 


3,756 06 


14,754 92 


3,403 91 


19,722 08 


3,282 76 


464 76 


23,505 57 


82,450 83 


862 00 


4,872 50 


783 66 


891 08 


6,215 79 


12,781 99 


416 00 


1,372 60 


2,058 68 


- 


226 66 


10,177 58 


1,454 94 


1,764 97 


519 97 


- 


1,900 72 


6,623 02 


- 


4,074 61 


52 80 


- 


6,452 74 


4,591 22 


3,052 21 


6,160 89 


203 31 


- 


2,901 52 


21,446 95 


7,272 51 


11,192 07 


4,787 93 


- 


32,385 78 


20,390 12 


21 86 


2,338 95 


- 


- 


1,200 47 


4,304 53 


- 


2,511 69 


20 85 


- 


- 


5,394 50 


236 50 


2,339 20 


10 00 


— 


2,641 64 


3,019 08 


11,160 19 


30,364 85 


13,412 90 


3,137 25 


66,448 33 


154,911 43 


5,555 70 


11,414 44 


1,130 28 


3,005 20 


14,966 67 


30,061 66 


1,875 00 


3,919 79 


1,076 05 


- 


5,075 07 


19,039 77 


- 


784 10 


453 38 


- 


518 77 


1,705 28 


729 00 


1,449 00 


210 22 


_ 


1,124 00 


3,702 88 


1,190,940 28 


1,298,104 57 


711,992 87 


4,698 96 


1,706,242 28 


12,396,842 56 


2,231 91 


9,959 22 


1,376 75 


- 


5,463 77 


14,653 84 


- 


260 00 


- 


- 


11 13 


1,022 39 


- 


828 00 


177 63 


_ 


675 29 


2,928 00 


- 


684 77 


233 71 


_ 


346 14 


1,666 07 


6,803 85 


35,364 82 


5,078 35 


37 00 


38,663 01 


66,821 39 


469 22 


3,517 28 


511 51 


- 


1,594 47 


4,521 52 


67 00 


10,534 37 


2,083 87 


1,449 64 


6,702 62 


23,323 08 


60 00 


1,088 00 


219 69 


- 


665 88 


4,394 52 


32,756 87 


73,116 71 


29,930 20 


7,323 86 


98,880 39 


457,135 50 


- 


5,283 01 


141 48 


- 


2,977 75 


4,175 16 


14,149 06 


34,546 90 


13,887 67 


89 00 


82,905 65 


160,055 32 


- 


2,375 88 


300 00 


- 


3,261 32 


7,181 31 


- 


2,584 35 


265 56 


- 


4,821 62 


6,211 74 


78,925 10 


117,548 00 


40,504 33 


1,369 00 


247,084 63 


609,835 14 


3,346 33 


13,039 22 


3,929 26 


- 


12,088 08 


48,393 51 


- 


1,788 00 


103 05 


- 


1,017 34 


1,771 06 


38 50 


2,856 92 


550 80 


- 


2,984 55 


7,179 72 


- 


498 75 


- 


- 


2,164 62 


3,402 84 


- 


3,393 00 


383 59 


- 


2,671 41 


8,625 52 


208 00 


6,398 15 


189 00 


- 


4,198 73 


13,203 48 


355 00 


7,570 58 


1,846 67 


907 92 


5,952 86 


27,450 58 


50,905 72 


42,946 87 


18,021 28 


- 


176,593 24 


449,475 42 


- 


3,259 58 


50 00 


- 


2,602 21 


13,711 64 


- 


1,606 61 


704 62 


- 


- 


13,734 57 


- 


1,671 50 


44 65 


- 


685 49 


1,838 55 


31,760 38 


19,955 50 


15,443 24 


530 00 


126,651 15 


274,973 51 


- 


2,134 61 


164 63 


- 


1,607 22 


1,748 55 


545 00 


2,616 73 


583 91 


- 


2,278 65 


4,425 38 


7,500 46 


11,611 34 


5,450 37 


59 00 


19,817 15 


120,452 15 


588 28 


6,282 90 


1,941 25 


831 47 


4,760 82 


27,495 79 


- 


1,248 88 


200 00 


- 


608 56 


4,650 35 


4,734 12 


6,514 19 


563 61 


3,196 28 


7,492 36 


25,897 22 


- 


2,510 24 


- 


- 


2,731 94 


3,689 98 


- 


762 00 


- 


- 


1,451 43 


1,351 99 


4,448 59 


6,835 90 


2,368 30 


- 


14,291 37 


35,167 62 


- 


935 20 


80 00 


- 


694 00 


2,002 24 


8,131 96 


24,260 93 


3,075 00 


- 


22,756 31 


41,682 00 


994 91 


11,822 09 


6,128 90 


- 


19,424 30 


37,352 79 


7,801 65 


12,910 49 


5,938 08 


415 00 


38,599 80 


131,039 23 


1,050 68 


4,406 94 


943 05 


- 


1,303 90 


18,402 09 


- 


11,442 51 


1,108 84 


- 


9,017 49 


22,738 01 



$3,580 42 



2,540 25 



348 88 



1,141 01 



5,105 70 



148 P.D. 17. 

Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poor 









Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinart 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




OUTSIDE 




TOWNS 


Expenditures 


















In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


1 


Dighton . . . $22,621 73 


$22,621 73 




. 


$1,595 00 


$16,602 07 


2 


Douglas 




13,102 20 


13,102 20 


$2,221 76 


$515 46 


156 00 


3,143 97 


3 


Dover 




3,127 55 


3,127 55 


311 78 


59 25 


243 00 


1,505 86 


4 


Dracut 




25,828 02 


25,828 02 


- 


1,768 45 


528 00 


15,280 66 


5 


Dudley 




18,561 61 


18,561 61 


1,890 98 


1,429 36 


732 00 


10,763 38 


6 


Dunstable . 




673 39 


673 39 


— 


- 


— 


398 39 


7 


Duxbury . 




24,752 17 


24,752 17 


2,437 36 


978 36 


664 50 


10,768 90 


S 


East Bridgewatei 




38,894 59 


38,894 59 


2,385 29 


1,153 95 


881 00 


18,857 92 


9 


East Brookfield 




5,965 71 


5,965 71 


729 06 


325 15 


- 


3,067 99 


10 


East Longmeado 


71 


14,206 39 


14,206 39 


- 


690 89 


- 


7,103 11 


11 


East ham . 




4,195 77 


4,195 77 


- 


- 


- 


1,748 48 


12 


Easthampton 




126,662 05 


126,662 05 


8,107 34 


7,863 64 


4,985 44 


90,904 97 


13 


Easton 




34,856 47 


34,856 47 


4,916 82 


2,684 24 


20 00 


16,226 16 


14 


Edgartown 




12,023 65 


12,023 65 


- 


706 42 


775 00 


3,848 18 


15 


Egremont . 




3,157 79 


3,157 79 


- 


- 


457 90 


908 57 


16 


Enfield . 




4,394 20 


4,394 20 


— 


- 


1,034 50 


1,415 41 


17 


Erving 




13,826 60 


13,826 60 


- 


961 73 


739 91 


8,664 83 


18 


Essex 




9,440 25 


9,440 25 


- 


681 00 


521 42 


3,691 51 


19 


Everett . 




654,344 80 


654,344 80 


2,734 14 


27,785 88 


4,570 96 


503,751 82 


20 


Fairhaven . 




92,602 98 


92,602 98 


6,704 50 


4,925 66 


- 


58,040 11 


21 


Fall River . 




693,790 08 


693,790 08 


63,639 25 


9,620 11 


- 


369,280 08 


22 


Falmouth . 




76,472 84 


76,472 84 


3,840 88 


4,980 77 


- 


51,106 09 


23 


Fitchburg . 




359,574 84 


359,574 84 


18,388 55 


12,678 91 


15,999 99 


227,634 05 


24 


Florida 




3,828 71 


3,828 71 


— 


355 62 


1,373 00 


1,519 44 


25 


Foxborough 




38,921 67 


38,921 67 


— 


1,185 14 


1,871 90 


21,475 50 


26 


Framingham 




159,506 34 


156,075 98 


2,346 33 


7,837 15 


— 


87,952 78 


27 


Franklin . 




47,343 69 


47,343 69 


7,433 30 


2,463 56 


2,591 93 


22,872 97 


28 


Freetown . 




13,855 99 


13,855 99 


897 53 


820 06 


31 50 


7,546 32 


29 


Gardner . 




112,887 79 


112,887 79 


16,776 78 


4,770 91 


3,024 71 


50,880 99 


30 


Gay Head . 




606 90 


606 90 


- 


- 


— 


- 


31 


Georgetown 




11,984 19 


11,984 19 


79 90 


813 41 


- 


4,904 50 


32 


Gill . 




10,290 50 


10,290 50 


— 


347 84 


1,463 20 


7,003 68 


33 


Gloucester 




197,165 77 


182,847 55 


20,929 66 


1,183 73 


- - 


105,607 38 


34 


Goshen 




1,579 50 


1,579 50 


- 


- 


484 37 


69 86 


35 


Gosnold . 




_ 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


36 


Grafton 




38,651 56 


38,651 56 


4,405 73 


6,726 67 


797 56 


10,263 16 


37 


Granby 




3,642 98 


3,642 98 


— 


107 84 


— 


3,535 14 


38 


Granville 




2,830 56 


2,830 56 


- 


237 50 


836 00 


1,668 91 


39 


Great Barrington 




57,993 28 


57,993 28 


— 


334 90 


5,203 48 


33,322 77 


40 


Greenfield . 




125,722 47 


125,175 02 


12,134 53 


6,147 10 


540 00 


70,907 22 


41 


Greenwich 




1,778 23 


1,778 23 


— 


— 


791 68 


— 


42 


Groton 




14,262 16 


14,262 16 


799 88 


524 50 


372 00 


5,903 61 


43 


Groveland . 




14,651 07 


14,651 07 


— 


633 00 


1,804 75 


5,592 43 


44 


Hadley . 




11,076 78 


11,076 78 


- 


401 70 


444 00 


5,592 47 


45 


Halifax . 




6,678 11 


6,678 11 


— 


20 58 


150 00 


5,219 03 


46 


Hamilton . 




18,520 56 


18,520 56 


1,794 00 


692 56 


435 29 


9,858 68 


47 


Hampden . 




3,233 32 


3,233 32 


- 


391 26 


498 80 


891 85 


48 


Hancock . 




4,739 19 


4,739 19 


— 


23 40 


2,435 48 


- 


49 


Hanover . 




30,798 54 


30,798 54 


3,331 28 


1,430 15 


583 50 


17,834 38 


50 


Hanson 




29,443 68 


29,443 68 


2,723 61 


1,191 26 


808 70 


14,832 21 


51 


Hard wick 1 




19,598 33 


19,598 33 


1,326 34 


1,197 83 


928 22 


12,833 00 


52 


Harvard . 




4,170 84 


4,170 84 


— 


54 00 


782 18 


1,725 22 


53 


Harwich 




26,617 33 


26,617 33 


2,681 57 


2,230 81 


63 00 


15,168 87 


54 


Hatfield . 




6,816 03 


6,816 03 


- 


923 68 


1,151 93 


2,997 62 


55 


Haverhill . 




754,369 26 


754,369 26 


57,528 04 


177,031 08 


— 


324,690 79 


56 


Hawley 




2,018 16 


2,018 16 


- 


164 55 


28 00 


533 22 


57 


Heath 




2,218 45 


2,218 45 


— 


74 11 


649 67 


- 


58 


Hingham . 




49,245 95 


49,245 95 


5,233 61 


1,365 78 


373 65 


22,100 33 


59 


Hinsdale . 




16,406 02 


16,406 02 


— 


340 51 


230 00 


10,765 06 


60 


Holbrook . 




18,083 34 


18,083 34 


— 


729 69 


- 


6,207 81 


61 


Holdeni . 




13,944 61 


13,944 61 


183 48 


1,933 79 


830 67 


7,328 51 


62 


Holland . 




1,271 00 


1,271 00 


35 00 


110 00 


- 


420 00 


63 


Holliston . 




21,030 93 


21,030 93 


3,456 31 


229 00 


- 


5,315 08 


64 


Holyoke . 




464,270 53 


464,270 53 


36,595 61 


28,366 76 


- 


295,116 32 


65 


Hopedale . 




13,957 90 


13,957 90 


1,461 55 


- 


676 91 


2,582 74 


66 


Hopkinton 




12,243 12 


12,243 12 


— 


- 


4,894 10 


2,292 08 


67 


Hubbardston 




7,756 19 


7,756 19 


- 


795 00 


- 


3,448 71 


68 


Hudson 




77,385 92 


77,019 10 


7,042 83 


2,681 92 


84 50 


47,985 65 


69 


Hull . 




32,174 11 


32,174 11 


- 


2,213 23 


2,367 03 


20,415 34 


70 


Huntington 




7,796 41 


7,796 41 


— 


- 


1,830 35 


4,629 79 


71 


Ipswich 




53,494 00 


53,494 00 


5,950 97 


1,273 24 


601 78 


30,767 13 


72 


Kingston . 




17,694 61 


17,694 61 


- 


545 00 


685 29 


7,377 91 


73 


Lakeville . 




9,280 26 


9,280 26 


- 


688 54 


775 12 


2,682 70 


74 


Lancaster . 




15,598 34 


15,598 34 


1,620 15 


935 65 


517 00 


7,078 36 


75 


Lanesborough 




4,500 65 


4,500 65 


— 


327 13 


896 32 


1,225 68 


76 


Lawrence . 




524,960 05 


524,960 05 


102,118 01 


6,457 32 


4,895 59 


267,150 31 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 

Persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes 



149 



Continued. 



Expenditures 


Receipts 


Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 


Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 
Institutions 






Administra- 
tion 


On Account 

of Support or 

Relief in 

Infirmaries 


All 
Other 




Mothers' 
Aid 


Old Age 

Assistance 





_ 


$4,199 66 


$225 00 


_ 


$3,136 33 


$19,485 40 


- 


1 


$2,633 00 


4,033 00 


399 01 


$122 99 


4,680 02 


8,299 19 


- 


2 


— 


562 66 


445 00 


- 


262 29 


2,865 26 


- 


3 


2,372 50 


4,454 99 


1,423 42 


- 


11,242 88 


14,585 14 


- 


4 


- 


1,793 94 


1,951 95 


- 


3,541 16 


15,020 45 


- 


5 


— 


275 00 


- 


- 


- 


673 39 


- 


6 


504 00 


7,914 82 


1,484 23 


151 60 


4,051 47 


20,549 10 


- 


7 


2,592 85 


10,291 35 


2,732 23 


1,103 81 


15,722 17 


22,068 61 


- 


8 


— 


1,454 00 


389 51 


- 


1,747 98 


4,217 73 


- 


9 


780 00 


3,798 15 


1,834 24 


- 


10,591 16 


3,615 23 


- 


10 


136 00 


2,258 78 


52 51 


- 


1,039 98 


3,155 79 


- 


11 


3,000 00 


7,282 94 


4,517 72 


910 82 


20,107 36 


105,643 87 


- 


12 


1,251 53 


8,045 82 


1,711 90 


204 40 


6,514 75 


28,137 32 


- 


13 


- 


6,073 26 


620 79 


- 


2,765 61 


9,258 04 


- 


14 


- 


1,791 32 


- 


- 


622 72 


2,535 07 


— 


15 


- 


1,831 59 


112 70 


- 


770 13 


3,624 07 


— 


16 


511 40 


2,333 73 


615 00 


- 


2,314 34 


11,512 26 


— 


17 


1,737 64 


2,648 95 


159 73 


- 


3,629 14 


5,811 11 


- 


18 


34,514 00 


55,397 30 


25,590 70 


— 


219,169 82 


435,174 98 


- 


19 


2,236 81 


17,472 05 


3,223 85 


100 08 


24,022 09 


68,480 81 


- 


20 


55,840 50 


146,888 71 


48,521 43 


1,210 54 


141,857 25 


550,722 29 


— 


21 


- 


9,324 96 


7,220 14 


243 16 


12,996 64 


63,233 04 


— 


22 


23,747 29 


40,007, 11 


21,118 94 


1,527 51 


122,826 39 


235,220 94 


- 


23 


529 15 


- 


51 50 


- 


447 41 


3,381 30 


- 


24 


914 00 


10,955 38 


2,519 75 


- 


15,127 07 


23,794 60 


- 


25 


18,360 43 


32,250 05 


7,329 24 


- 


55,658 71 


100,417 27 


$3,430 36 


26 


1,825 07 


7,128 43 


3,028 43 


738 15 


9,389 77 


37,215 77 


- 


27 


61 75 


4,397 83 


101 00 


- 


4,649 02 


9,206 97 


— 


28 


4,440 47 


24,954 09 


8,039 84 


3,773 56 


30,240 44 


78,873 79 


- 


29 


- 


606 90 


- 


- 


17 00 


589 90 


- 


30 


627 95 


5,179 04 


379 39 


- 


4,199 67 


7,784 52 


- 


31 


- 


1,185 28 


290 50 


- 


3,310 57 


6,979 93 


- 


32 


5,074 78 


30,485 38 


19,566 62 


10 00 


43,662 16 


139,175 39 


14,318 22 


33 


- 


936 04 


89 23 


- 


871 43 


708 07 


- 


34 
35 
36 


4,105 89 


10,309 22 


2,043 33 


337 10 


10,825 84 


27,488 62 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,642 98 


- 


37 


— 


- 


88 15 


- 


223 34 


2,607 22 


— 


38 


1,691 75 


12,994 39 


4,445 99 


— 


9,178 70 


48,814 58 


— 


39 


3,036 50 


22,360 99 


10,048 68 


2,290 38 


25,698 99 


97,185 65 


547 45 


40 


911 55 


- 


75 00 


- 


435 21 


1,343 02 


- 


41 


242 00 


6,247 80 


172 37 


_ 


9,381 28 


4,880 88 


— 


42 


810 00 


4,964 15 


846 74 


- 


5,438 75 


9,212 32 


- 


43 


2,028 17 


2,462 44 


148 00 


- 


4,236 94 


6,839 84 


- 


44 


- 


1,193 50 


95 00 


- 


1,816 19 


4,861 92 


- 


45 


1,578 82 


3,970 81 


190 40 


- 


3,329 17 


15,191 39 


- 


46 


- 


1,371 70 


79 71 


- 


1,511 44 


1,721 88 


- 


47 


— 


1,619 65 


660 66 


- 


1,033 15 


3,706 04 


- 


48 


666 75 


5,819 99 


1,132 49 


63 30 


8,643 70 


22,091 54 


- 


49 


1,736 73 


7,641 48 


509 69 


40 20 


9,279 30 


20,124 18 


- 


50 


- 


2,252 75 


1,060 19 


- 


3,866 54 


15,731 79 


- 


51 


416 00 


1,050 39 


143 05 


- 


706 25 


3,464 59 


— 


52 


- 


4,390 48 


2,082 60 


- 


7,649 97 


18,967 36 


- 


53 


40 00 


1,000 41 


702 39 


- 


575 73 


6,240 30 


- 


54 


57,589 07 


108,480 60 


29,049 68 


35,876 94 


178,241 42 


540,250 90 


- 


55 


520 00 


772 39 


- 


— 


444 08 


1,574 08 


- 


56 


- 


1,494 67 


- 


- 


551 16 


1,667 29 


- 


57 


1,538 80 


15,806 21 


2,827 57 


506 50 


15,116 14 


33,623 31 


- 


z58 


322 63 


4,647 82 


100 00 


- 


7,207 40 


9,198 62 


- 


59 


- 


10,485 95 


659 89 


- 


4,212 79 


13,870 55 


— 


60 


440 00 


2,776 75 


451 41 


- 


8,041 64 


5,902 97 


— 


61 


- 


676 00 


30 00 


- 


- 


1,271 00 


_ 


62 


3,954 64 


7,845 36 


230 54 


599 28 


7,752 63 


12,679 02 


_ 


63 


33,693 98 


47,534 02 


22,963 84 


2,202 99 


73,852 97 


388,214 57 


— 


64 


4,880 26 


3,831 44 


525 00 


- 


4,574 25 


9,383 65 


— 


65 


- 


4,161 16 


895 78 


— 


3,364 00 


8,879 12 


- 


66 


— 


3,316 48 


196 00 


- 


1,490 33 


6,265 86 


- 


67 


8,498 99 


8,500 00 


2,225 21 


975 38 


15,190 63 


60,853 09 


366 82 


68 


- 


5,756 00 


1,422 51 


- 


2,202 41 


29,971 70 


- 


69 


404 80 


856 47 


75 00 


- 


2,298 38 


5,498 03 


- 


70 


3,578 50 


7,160 68 


4,161 70 


1,241 33 


11,206 86 


41,045 81 


— 


71 


767 00 


6,914 98 


1,404 43 


- 


7,952 76 


9,741 85 


- 


72 


- 


4,603 40 


530 50 


- 


1,947 38 


7,332 88 


_ 


73 


2,102 63 


2,949 81 


394 74 


- 


3,960 85 


11,637 49 


_ 


74 


- 


2,005 45 


46 07 


- 


2,959 57 


1,541 08 


_ 


75 


47,841 59 


82,619 86 


13,877 37 


2,975 60 


73,538 82 


448,445 63 


- 


76 



150 P.D. 17. 

Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poor 











Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinary 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




OUTBIDS 




TOWNS 


Expenditures 












In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


1 


Lee . . . . $40,811 20 


$40,811 20 


_ 


$1,312 16 


$1,614 00 


$25,918 64 


2 


Leicester 1 . 




34,788 30 


34,788 30 


$840 94 


87 14 


885 24 


21,803 55 


3 


Lenox 




29,566 75 


29,566 75 


424 29 


2,453 50 


1,257 65 


18,221 90 


4 


Leominster 




192,689 11 


192,689 11 


11,196 83 


8,938 40 


3,652 78 


109,023 29 


5 


Leverett . 




6,023 74 


6,023 74 


- 


653 81 


- 


2,395 98 


6 


Lexington . 




59,603 89 


59,603 89 


365 00 


2,887 73 


3,005 95 


35,612 90 


7 


Leyden 




967 30 


967 30 


- 


46 60 


579 16 


- 


8 


Lincoln 




5,867 75 


5,867 75 


— 


985 75 


780 00 


2,886 00 


9 


Littleton . 




2,843 19 


2,843 19 


- 


- 


160 00 


1,937 69 


10 


Longmeadow 




10,931 80 


10,931 80 


547 50 


979 49 


287 60 


6,220 63 


11 


Lowell 




947,349 76 


946,853 76 


91,139 82 


43,995 04 


10,564 00 


520,365 95 


12 


Ludlow 




66,640 67 


65,441 49 


- 


2,126 75 


- 


53,876 62 


13 


Lunenburg 




12,765 58 


12,765 58 


- 


1,290 70 


1,450 50 


6,204 03 


14 


Lynn 




1,016,269 14 


1,016,269 14 


36,934 25 


33,444 44 


9,744 06 


615,356 76 


15 


Lynnfield . 




8,826 04 


8,826 04 


- 


290 05 


- 


3,630 30 


16 


Maiden 




416,153 75 


416,153 75 


24,148 35 


19,581 40 


1,713 60 


298,790 29 


17 


Manchester 




25,372 07 


25,372 07 


4,615 76 


1,815 18 


88 00 


11,900 96 


18 


Mansfield . 




37,462 85 


37,462 85 


6,664 27 


1,316 62 


43 68 


18,326 68 


19 


Marblehead 




70,166 91 


70,166 91 


6,150 62 


800 00 


399 28 


24,878 66 


20 


Marion 




21,879 40 


21,879 40 


312 00 


590 25 


1,306 88 


12,810 78 


21 


Marlborough 




93,345 35 


93,345 35 


10,988 95 


4,586 29 


- 


41,069 95 


22 


Marshfield 




27,043 49 


27,043 49 


4,744 65 


1,382 94 


- 


11,649 76 


23 


Mashpee . 




6,416 71 


6,416 71 


— 


427 98 


655 63 


2,359 11 


24 


Mattapoisett 




13,883 79 


13,883 79 


— 


735 12 


1,030 57 


7,226 88 


25 


Maynard . 




47,354 36 


47,354 36 


- 


3,077 62 


- 


26,947 17 


26 


Medfield . 




13,306 28 


13,306 28 


- 


1,621 24 


1,318 30 


4,574 74 


27 


Medford . 




361,817 79 


361,817 79 


8,096 36 


11,222 45 


- 


241,204 88 


28 


Medway . 




17,021 63 


17,021 63 


- 


2,669 73 


150 00 


7,095 54 


29 


Melrose 




112,842 44 


112,842 44 


— 


2,594 89 


3,588 00 


54,071 76 


30 


Mendon . 




4,980 63 


4,980 63 


- 


- 


- 


3,379 14 


31 


Merrimac . 




38,165 51 


38,165 51 


- 


1,337 87 


1,073 96 


24,831 69 


32 


Methuen . 




161,541 54 


161,541 54 


8,248 45 


4,981 92 


2,005 49 


98,901 37 


33 


Middleborough 




78,640 24 


77,124 65 


9,091 20 


1,895 23 


5,421 15 


26,442 40 


34 


Middlefield 




579 05 


579 05 


— 


- 


- 


346 38 


35 


Middleton 




16,380 69 


16,380 69 


- 


976 10 


- 


7,658 92 


36 


Milford . 




82,940 69 


82,940 69 


15,761 72 


2,210 00 


1,912 30 


21,307 04 


37 


Milbury 




54,388 52 


54,388 52 


2,897 08 


2,685 95 


- 


31,356 53 


38 


Millis 




7,878 37 


7,878 37 


— 


- 


520 00 


4,167 95 


39 


Millville . 




11,022 01 


11,022 01 


- 


177 55 


288 00 


4,649 30 


40 


Milton 




27,004 10 


27,004 10 


4,115 63 


2,391 78 


520 57 


8,895 71 


41 


Monroe 




1,010 33 


1,010 33 


- 


- 


— 


105 73 


42 


Monson 




33,580 04 


33,580 04 


6,478 97 


756 50 


806 23 


17,108 97 


43 


Montague . 




85,243 13 


85,243 13 


4,942 27 


3,206 37 


2,922 40 


54,713 43 


44 


Monterey . 




1,503 08 


1,503 08 


- 


293 35 


— 


175 77 


45 


Montgomery 




365 60 


365 60 


- 


- 


- 


29 10 


46 


Mt. Washington 




- 


- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


47 


Nahant 




7,382 08 


7,382 08 


- 


- 


- 


3,077 85 


48 


Nantucket 




43,319 30 


43,319 30 


4,811 07 


2,131 40 


1,007 00 


17,018 35 


49 


Natick 




138,287 29 


138,287 29 


14,140 33 


4,225 55 


245 51 


72,209 74 


50 


Needham . 




64,993 94 


64,993 94 


- 


2,603 57 


2,913 05 


29,921 08 


51 


New Ashford 




335 60 


335 60 


- 


- 


- 


59 25 


52 


New Bedford 




706,942 17 


706,942 17 


65,391 99 


71,942 37 


- 


301,354 82 


53 


New Braintree 




2,325 58 


2,325 58 


- 


- 


- 


568 82 


54 


New Marlboroug 


l 


7,993 77 


7,993 77 


- 


38 60 


946 00 


3,226 30 


55 


New Salem 




4,248 78 


4,248 78 


- 


150 00 


548 15 


1,974 61 


56 


Newbury . 




11,887 28 


11,887 28 


- 


200 12 


756 70 


4,184 39 


57 


Newburyport 




128,502 47 


128,502 47 


12,600 78 


4,940 58 


505 68 


73,152 12 


58 


Newton 




286,520 09 


286,520 09 


10,466 87 


20,459 73 


- 


166,560 12 


59 


Norfolk . 




5,080 32 


5,080 32 


— 


235 80 


288 00 


2,498 03 


60 


North Adams 




171,881 98 


171,881 98 


10,296 19 


8,916 50 


- 


94,283 04 


61 


North Andover 




38,330 21 


38,330 21 


4,893 96 


2,343 39 


474 00 


12,187 47 


62 


North Attleborough 


53,005 56 


53,005 56 


8,875 17 


1,276 88 


1,877 50 


19,708 02 


63 


North Brookfield 


26,705 62 


26,705 62 


4,128 69 


260 71 


563 00 


11,813 65 


64 


North Reading . 


8,116 52 


8,116 52 


- 


1,363 00 


635 22 


3,595 03 


65 


Northampton 




120,869 11 


120,869 11 


11,095 00 


11,021 94 


- 


65,889 98 


66 


Northborough . 




12,416 94 


12,416 94 


- 


1,453 86 


1,241 20 


4,609 62 


67 


Northbridge 




66,822 97 


66,822 97 


8,299 52 


14,016 67 


160 62 


32,192 71 


68 


Northfield . 




14,664 23 


14,664 23 


- 


363 03 


1,937 06 


7,398 73 


69 


Norton 




18,361 87 


18,361 87 


- 


906 00 


1,552 50 


8,901 46 


70 


Norwell 




12,303 96 


12,303 96 


2,646 34 


366 66 


- 


4,412 29 


71 


Norwood . 




67,747 90 


67,747 90 


436 00 


1,852 53 


8,742 56 


29,466 28 


72 


Oak Bluffs 




15,470 98 


15,470 98 


- 


1,890 07 


319 50 


6,526 50 


73 


Oakham 1 . 




2,012 60 


2,012 60 


485 20 


136 46 


988 09 


50 00 


74 


Orange 




43,057 20 


43,057 20 


- 


2,187 81 


3,200 50 


18,716 86 


75 


Orleans 




11,526 59 


11,526 59 


- 


106 00 


- 


8,064 73 


76 


Otis . 




5,226 17 


5,226 17 






3,064 85 





1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 151 

Persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes — Continued. 



Expenditures 


Receipts 




Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 






Administra- 


On Account 
of Support or 


All 


Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 










Mothers' 
Aid 


Old Age 
Assistance 


tion 


Relief in 
Infirmaries 


Other 




Institutions 




$1,298100 
1,914102 


$10,037 06 


$631 34 


_ 


$6,696 15 


$34,115 05 


_ 


! 


6,642 51 


2,614 90 


- 


11,460 04 


23,328 26 


- 


2 


2,139 43 


4,248 85 


821 13 


- 


8i)64 24 
54,114 49 


21,502 51 


— 


3 


12,983 66 


36,990 86 


9,903 29 


$2,476 01 


136,098 61 


- 


4 


- 


2,933 90 


40 05 


— 


1,549 38 


4,474 36 


- 


5 


3,917 72 


10,037 24 


3,777 35 


- 


31,583 51 


28,020 38 


- 


6 


- 


341 54 


- 


— 


- 


967 30 


- 


7 


10 00 


1,206 00 


- 


- 


823 33 


5,044 42 


- 


8 


- 


745 50 


- 


- 


1,107 39 


1,735 80 


- 


9 


- 


1,705 00 


1,191 58 


- 


810 21 


10,121 59 


- 


10 


111,348 59 


138,323 46 


31,116 90 


818 32 


133,019 02 


813,016 42 


$496 00 


11 


- 


4,141 00 


5,297 12 


- 


10,164 08 


55,277 41 


1,199 18 


12 


- 


3,269 83 


550 52 


- 


3,777 09 


8,888 49 


- 


13 


66,877 05 


221,182 09 


32,730 49 


1,653 12 


274,749 52 


739,866 50 


- 


14 


- 


4,748 00 


157 69 


- 


2,793 77 


6,032 27 


- 


15 


- 


49,910 93 


22,009 18 


9,859 38 


98,677 05 


307,617 32 


- 


16 


1,110 57 


4,866 81 


974 79 


- 


1,886 99 


23,485 08 


- 


17 


1,606 04 


6,783 00 


2,722 56 


1,942 54 


6,191 81 


29,328 50 


- 


18 


3,022 12 


32,930 45 


1,985 78 


111 00 


15,449 15 


54,606 76 


- 


19 


- 


5,465 23 


1,394 26 


- 


2,992 73 


18,886 67 


— 


20 


12,132 49 


19,400 15 


5,167 52 


— 


33,342 21 


60,003 14 


- 


21 


1,387 00 


6,119 00 


1,760 14 


375 00 


7,177 75 


19,490 74 


- 


22 


1,321 74 


1,652 25 


— 


- 


823 60 


5,593 11 


- 


23 


- 


4,155 07 


736 15 


— 


2,503 48 


11,380 31 


- 


24 


6,124 96 


8,444 14 


2,760 47 


— 


11,235 22 


36,119 14 


- 


25 


741 00 


4,754 99 


296 01 


— 


2,843 24 


10,463 04 


- 


26 


23,668 70 


59,270 76 


18,354 64 


84 05 


59,677 90 


302,055 84 


- 


27 


1,705 98 


4,838 81 


561 57 


— 


7,134 99 


9,886 64 


— 


28 


6,941 82 


38,574 27 


7,071 70 


- 


32,171 60 


80,670 84 


- 


29 


— 


1,493 43 


108 06 


- 


3,384 31 


1,596 32 


— 


30 


1,608 39 


8,976 10 


337 50 


— 


10,306 36 


27,859 15 


- 


31 


10,759 03 


30,805 96 


5,839 32 


1,519 49 


44,668 03 


115,354 0G 


- 


32 


6,474 23 


25,091 22 


2,709 22 


- 


29,981 32 


47,143 33 


1,515 59 


33 


- 


232 67 


— 


— 


- 


579 05 


— 


34 


416 00 


6,579 84 


749 83 


— 


7,931 18 


8,449 51 


_ 


35 


15,376 90 


21,028 50 


5,344 23 


3,474 24 


23,407 53 


56,058 92 


- 


36 


2,641 00 


12,450 67 


2,357 29 


— 


4,921 24 


49,467 28 


- 


37 


692 00 


2,330 00 


168 42 


— 


2,124 38 


5,753 99 


- 


38 


2,293 00 


3,595 91 


18 25 


— 


4,733 93 


6,288 08 


- 


39 


- 


9,252 18 


1,828 23 


1,395 08 


3,836 93 


21,772 09 


- 


40 


633 60 


271 00 


- 


- 


494 00 


516 33 


- 


41 


2,633 50 


5,436 12 


359 75 


2,111 72 


2,186 45 


29,281 87 


- 


42 


2,987 69 


11,658 86 


4,812 11 


1,849 85 


17,336 79 


66,056 49 


— 


43 


— 


1,023 96 


10 00 


- 


259 25 


1,243 83 


— 


44 


- 


240 00 


96 50 


- 


- 


365 60 


- 


45 
46 

47 


465 06 


3,579 71 


259 46 


- 


3,591 85 


3,790 23 


z 


3,517 00 


12,960 53 


1,873 95 


7 00 


11,284 09 


32,028 21 


- 


48 


17,562 37 


24,103 79 


5,800 00 


2,097 55 


37,534 95 


98,654 79 


- 


49 


7,014 39 


13,653 39 


8,888 46 


- 


25,520 94 


39,473 00 


— 


50 


— 


244 30 


32 05 


- 


- 


335 60 


— 


51 


56,170 09 


182,749 00 


29,333 90 


1,627 37 


158,395 05 


546,919 75 


- 


52 


877 76 


879 00 


- 


— 


2,415 29 


89 71 


- 


53 


- 


3,198 62 


589 25 


- 


1,043 13 


6,950 64 


- 


54 


- 


1,414 00 


162 02 


- 


764 81 


3,483 97 


- 


55 


905 54 


5,467 93 


372 60 


— 


2,441 70 


9,445 58 


- 


56 


7,482 90 


24,217 02 


5,603 39 


529 77 


42,378 00 


85,594 70 


- 


57 


24,623 89 


48,592 90 


15,816 58 


564 00 


52,144 12 


233,811 97 


— 


58 


1,124 74 


783 75 


150 00 


— 


552 88 


4,527 44 


- 


59 


10,393 44 


40,227 04 


7,765 77 


2,132 75 


46,570 73 


123,178 50 


- 


50 


4,885 30 


12,629 41 


916 68 


346 01 


11,511 34 


26,472 86 


- 


31 


5,419 01 


11,971 42 


3,877 56 


1,650 96 


18,611 55 


32,743 05 


- 


52 


2,108 04 


6,785 35 


1,046 18 


1,919 00 


15,179 27 


9,607 35 


- 


53 


250 00 


1,756 22 


517 05 


— 


2,763 79 


5,352 73 


1 


54 


2,239 00 


21,669 15 


8,954 04 


1,730 70 


23,815 70 


95,322 71 


( 


55 


- 


4,355 68 


756 58 


- 


3,985 91 


8,431 03 


66 


333 77 


7,355 21 


4,464 47 


468 67 


20,014 27 


46,340 03 


- 


57 


- 


4,965 41 


— 


— 


3,582 15 


11,082 08 


- 


58 


- 


5,866 00 


1,135 91 


— 


5,948 18 


12,413 69 


- 


59 


— 


4,428 67 


450 00 


122 70 


3,466 30 


8,714 96 


_ ' 


JO 


10,754 52 


7,602 58 


8,893 43 


- 


19,043 83 


48,704 07 


71 


1,556 14 


3,429 17 


1,749 60 


— 


3,075 02 


12,395 96 


72 


- 


250 00 


102 85 


- 


414 69 


1,597 91 


73 


- 


16,344 32 


2,607 71 


- 


18,604 63 


24,452 57 


74 


— 


3,175 00 


180 86 


- 


2,001 91 


9,524 68 


75 




2,047 00 


114 32 


~ 


550 52 


4,675 65 


76 



152 



P.D. 17. 
Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poor 









Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinary 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




OUTBIDS 




TOWNS 


Expenditures 












In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


1 


Oxford . . . $29,644 88 


$29,644 88 


$5,154 54 


$1,552 85 


_ 


$11,806 28 


2 


Palmer 




41,049 34 


41,049 34 


6,263 55 


4,101 23 


$1,220 14 


20,630 89 


3 


Paxton l . 




2,051 83 


2,051 83 


226 60 


- 


380 00 


1,068 24 


4 


Peabody 




167,371 06 


167,371 06 


23,335 34 


19,309 61 


3,316 75 


78,068 75 


5 


Pelham 




5,112 65 


5,112 65 


- 


15 00 


19 00 


1,751 10 


6 


Pembroke . 




14,228 10 


14,228 10 


1,960 15 


2,606 00 


260 00 


5,844 40 


7 


Pepperell . 




17,564 40 


17,564 40 


- 


1,414 11 


1,586 00 


8,009 00 


8 


Peru 




445 13 


445 13 


- 


- 


- 


371 13 


9 


Petersham 




6,361 80 


6,361 80 


- 


191 21 


1,444 10 


1,414 45 


10 


Phillipston 
Pittsfield . 




4,175 02 


4,175 02 


- 


— 


1,216 68 


1,055 17 


11 




603,739 45 


602,531 95 


18,422 09 


32,604 90 


7,260 44 


423,865 75 


12 


Plainfield . 




1,025 77 


1,025 77 


- 


— 


- 


155 10 


13 


Plainville . 




12,639 73 


12,639 73 


427 75 


186 00 


1,341 00 


4,261 33 


14 


Plymouth . 




113,520 45 


113,520 45 


7,169 42 


2,140 14 


- 


68,363 04 


15 


Plympton . 




6,348 05 


6,348 05 


— 


264 00 


- 


3,549 99 


16 


Prescott . 




423 99 


423 99 


— 


_ 


— 


166 82 


17 


Princeton l 




2,452 79 


2,452 79 


52 15 


295 30 


750 00 


1,073 34 


18 


Provincetown 




22,000 06 


22,000 06 


2,994 70 


- 


- 


9,744 87 


19 


Quincy 




507,487 11 


507,487 11 


8,194 64 


18,640 65 


1,169 82 


320,186 67 


20 


Randolph . 




50,900 67 


50,900 67 


5,196 42 


627 71 


- 


26,493 13 


21 


Raynham . 




9,862 16 


9,862 16 


- 


1,028 96 


642 00 


4,438 36 


22 


Reading . 




94,409 26 


94,409 26 


— 


3,914 78 


3,710 23 


57,709 18 


23 


Rehoboth . 




12,924 86 


12,924 86 


— 


1,302 76 


616 00 


6,099 20 


24 


Revere 




373,240 04 


373,240 04 


— 


7,873 57 


— 


288,698 87 


25 


Richmond . 




4,098 19 


4,098 19 


- 


520 00 


- 


2,408 69 


26 


Rochester . 




6,699 43 


6,699 43 


— 


324 12 


1,420 24 


2,994 52 


27 


Rockland . 




83,186 12 


83,186 12 


8,500 50 


1,706 13 


1,411 60 


42,686 44 


28 


Rockport . 




34,926 55 


34,926 55 


4,658 19 


- 


— 


20,535 17 


29 


Rowe 




3,302 66 


3,302 66 


556 64 


366 75 


839 05 


1,238 52 


30 


Rowley 




10,372 24 


10,372 24 


— 


321 14 


— 


3,036 46 


31 


Royalston 




6,966 86 


6,966 86 


— 


633 35 


811 59 


3,715 24 


32 


Russell 




8,351 18 


8,351 18 


— 


17 00 


1,027 84 


4,037 97 


33 


Rutland l . 




7,840 02 


7,840 02 


615 24 


2,130 26 


— 


2,442 03 


34 


Salem 




402,408 58 


401,781 94 


21,178 82 


31,116 54 


3,905 34 


194,672 29 


35 


Salisbury . 




26,617 46 


26,617 46 


- 


1,427 15 


607 00 


15,924 15 


36 


Sandisfield 




3,023 50 


3,023 50 


- 


162 80 


475 90 


540 80 


37 


Sandwich . 




9,091 51 


9,091 51 


- 


349 80 


456 00 


3,624 92 


38 


Saugus 




48,074 33 


48,074 33 


3,012 20 


2,368 79 


- 


11,784 88 


39 


Savoy 




1,428 64 


1,428 64 


— 


- 


- 


211 39 


40 


Scituate 




37,258 12 


37,258 12 


- 


1,098 28 


1,564 50 


15,263 44 


41 


Seekonk . 




29,163 88 


29,163 88 


- 


2,526 29 


993 99 


18,212 36 


42 


Sharon 




23,094 96 


17,835 43 


— 


1,290 27 


- 


9,841 96 


43 


Sheffield . 




10,310 80 


10,310 80 


- 


664 30 


1,194 42 


4,541 94 


44 


Shelburne . 




8,299 12 


8,299 12 


- 


758 67 


- 


5,261 45 


45 


Sherborn . 




6,964 87 


6,837 70 


— 


82 00 


604 50 


1,983 14 


46 


Shirley . 




13,169 94 


13,169 94 


- 


2,390 79 


1,391 30 


6,047 04 


47 


Shrewsbury 




52,470 81 


50,334 82 


- 


20,077 90 


2,806 07 


11,103 90 


48 


Shutesbury 




1,545 54 


1,545 54 


- 


447 90 


160 97 


156 00 


49 


Somerset . 




36,473 62 


36,473 62 


1,929 07 


— 


- 


26,817 16 


50 


Somerville 




892,784 08 


892,784 08 


16,412 73 


64,245 93 


13,746 89 


585,764 75 


51 


South Hadley 




54,700 26 


54,700 26 


4,784 03 


5,217 12 


266 64 


31,445 81 


52 


Southampton 




3,074 38 


3,074 33 


— 


199 89 


337 70 


772 69 


53 


Southborough 




8,558 84 


8,558 84 


25 00 


233 66 


1,413 18 


1,899 93 


54 


Southbridge 




76,266 56 


75,066 56 


5,433 14 


5,608 02 


3,042 59 


36,670 67 


55 


Southwick 




14,889 44 


14,889 44 


— 


968 64 


2,882 00 


7,055 12 


56 


Spencer 




34,104 79 


34,104 79 


7,883 42 


1,054 27 


- 


7,107 76 


57 


Springfield 




1,481,715 32 


1,477,560 76 


93,227 96 


113,873 43 


- 


915,223 63 


58 


Sterling 1 . 




11,667 36 


11,667 36 


626 90 


940 57 


- 


5,154 69 


59 


Stockbridge 




15,676 17 


15,676 17 


312 00 


- 


4,184 45 


10,183 37 


60 


Stoneham . 




64,199 46 


64,199 46 


7,748 70 


840 92 


2,895 86 


26,513 36 


61 


Stoughton . 




55,510 16 


55,510 16 


3,069 89 


1,323 81 


4,501 87 


25,873 32 


62 


Stow 




7,517 18 


7,517 18 


- 


1,466 37 


914 13 


4,287 01 


63 


Sturbridge 




11,286 19 


11,286 19 


4,456 95 


1,021 11 


165 00 


3,101 39 


64 


Sudbury . 




5,622 21 


5,622 21 


— 


297 26 


178 00 


3,652 45 


65 


Sunderland 




4,400 93 


4,400 93 


- 


110 00 


— 


1,957 71 


66 


Sutton 




19,138 97 


18,080 67 


4,995 37 


560 58 


240 00 


8,571 65 


67 


Swampscott 




26,463 60 


26,463 60 


- 


1,583 78 


418 28 


12,512 98 


68 


Swansea . 




18,404 40 


16,242 26 


— 


968 99 


410 00 


9,888 03 


69 


Taunton . 




266,120 28 


266,120 28 


21,864 97 


9,276 68 


5,232 66 


175,514 21 


70 


Templeton 
Tewksbury 




41,487 39 


41,487 39 


— 


1,744 10 


2,825 94 


25,987 67 


71 




13,518 23 


13,518 23 


- 


1,402 92 


- 


10,592 64 


72 


Tisbury 




11,386 41 


11,386 41 


- 


- 


- 


5,021 60 


73 


Tolland . 




74 14 


74 14 


- 


74 14 


— 


— 


74 


Topsfield . 




6,376 21 


6,376 21 


- 


430 56 


1,566 65 


113 83 


75 


Townsend . 




14,911 95 


14,911 95 


2,792 18 


2,520 78 


- 


2,811 61 


76 


Truro 




1,708 67 


1,708 67 


" 


184 00 




743 34 



1 Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 153 

Persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes — Continued. 



Expenditures 






Receipts 




















Extraordi- 




















Administra- 


On Account 
of Support or 


All 


Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 


nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 












Mothers' 
Aid 


Old Age 
Assistance 


tion 


Relief in 
Infirmaries 


Other 




Institutions 






$9,079 11 


$2,052 10 


$596 21 


$8,591 80 


$20,456 87 


_ 


1 


$736 37 


5,133 69 


2,963 47 


3,593 91 


11,797 62 


25,657 81 


- 


2 


\ - 


260 00 


116 99 


- 


871 77 


1,180 06 


- 


3 


8,065 13 


25,781 32 


9,494 16 


3,129 75 


20,971 58 


143,269 73 


- 


4 


- 


3,276 00 


51 55 


- 


1,525 47 


3,587 18 


- 


5 


672 00 


2,608 20 


277 35 


489 80 


1,637 13 


12,101 17 


- 


6 


2,236 00 


4,006 00 


313 29 


- 


4,869 00 


12,695 40 


- 


7 


- 


74 00 


- 


- 


294 93 


150 20 


- 


8 


- 


3,140 92 


171 12 


- 


1,368 82 


4,992 98 


- 


9 


312 00 


1,474 42 


116 75 


- 


4,186 86 


11 84 


- 


10 


7,081 45 


78,550 52 


34,746 80 


3,467 08 


138,301 13 


460,763 74 


$1,207 50 


11 


- 


870 67 


- 


- 


256 00 


769 77 


- 


12 


1,427 47 


4,058 00 


938 18 


- 


3,031 53 


9,608 20 


- 


13 


2,088 00 


28,867 47 


4,892 38 


109 00 


28,983 07 


84,428 38 


- 


14 


282 00 


2,252 06 


- 


- 


1,585 44 


4,762 61 


- 


15 


- 


234 67 


22 50 


- 


- 


423 99 


- 


16 


- 


282 00 


_ 


- 


- 


2,452 79 


- 


17 


416 01 


7,642 00 


1,202 48 


100 00 


1,867 53 


20,032 53 


- 


18 


30,298 81 


93,034 36 


35,962 16 


- 


156,797 21 


350,689 90 


- 


19 


2,491 70 


14,754 34 


1,337 37 


402 55 


16,920 79 


33,577 33 


— 


20 


273 63 


3,144 21 


335 00 


- 


3,712 80 


6,149 36 


- 


21 


6,281 26 


16,948 75 


5,845 06 


- 


24,437 57 


69,971 69 


— 


22 


532 00 


3,941 05 


433 85 


- 


3,536 47 


9,388 39 


— 


23 


23,267 74 


34,132 53 


19,267 33 


- 


87,769 16 


285,470 88 


- 


24 


195 50 


974 00 


- 


- 


1,293 34 


2,804 85 


- 


25 


403 47 


1,354 72 


202 36 


- 


1,459 52 


5,239 91 


- 


26 


4,520 27 


21,423 49 


2,937 69 


1,551 11 


27,248 68 


54,386 33 


- 


27 


601 88 


7,912 70 


1,218 61 


315 00 


10,261 12 


24,350 43 


- 


28 


- 


288 00 


13 70 


- 


1,405 24 


1,897 42 


- 


29 


2,574 50 


4,092 64 


347 50 


- 


2,785 87 


7,586 37 


- 


30 


- 


1,472 00 


334 68 


- 


597 33 


6,369 53 


- 


31 


- 


2,947 43 


320 94 


- 


3,378 80 


4,972 38 


- 


32 


780 00 


1,414 67 


457 82 


- 


2,544 71 


5,295 31 


— 


33 


48,707 84 


83,746 67 


18,454 44 


2,818 60 


111,496 03 


287,467 31 


626 64 


34 


- 


7,822 31 


836 85 


- 


1,726 64 


24,890 82 


- 


35 


— 


1,844 00 


— 


— 


964 21 


2,059 29 


- 


36 


152 25 


4,060 45 


448 09 


- 


1,745 46 


7,346 05 


- 


37 


2,569 00 


19,497 83 


8,841 63 


204 00 


14,913 76 


32,956 57 


— 


38 


653 25 


459 00 


105 00 


— 


159 13 


1,269 51 


— 


39 


2,186 01 


14,102 75 


3,043 14 


- 


11,740 80 


25,517 32 


- 


40 


2,415 15 


3,631 09 


1,385 00 


- 


9,135 80 


. 20,028 08 


— 


41 


678 34 


4,555 79 


1,469 07 


- 


6,503 33 


11,332 10 


5,259 53 


42 


589 50 


3,290 64 


30 00 


- 


2,128 58 


8,182 22 


- 


43 


- 


2,229 00 


50 00 


- 


3,857 12 


4,442 00 


— 


44 


1,360 10 


2,675 61 


132 35 


- 


3,496 17 


3,341 53 


127 17 


45 


- 


2,967 69 


373 12 


- 


4,353 65 


8,816 29 


- 


46 


1,952 00 


6,010 40 


8,384 55 


— 


36,358 17 


13,976 65 


2,135 99 


47 


- 


755 47 


25 20 


— 


193 01 


1,352 53 


- 


48 


- 


5,735 52 


1,991 87 


217 00 


2,379 30 


33,877 32 


- 


49 


43.299 38 


128,777 64 


40,536 76 


4,516 18 


266,135 72 


622,132 18 


— 


50 


2,868 99 


5,425 25 


4,692 42 


736 17 


26,472 48 


27,491 61 


- 


51 


- 


1,705 00 


59 10 


- 


1,193 37 


1,881 01 


- 


52 


420 00 


3,925 57 


641 50 


- 


4,042 24 


4,516 60 


- 


53 


9,288 91 


10,845 74 


4,177 49 


227 69 


18,464 94 


56,373 93 


1,200 00 


54 


- 


2,379 29 


1,604 39 


— 


6,085 93 


8,803 51 


— 


55 


3,237 50 


13,694 00 


1,127 84 


4,230 47 


9,743 62 


20,130 70 


— 


56 


37,550 52 


167,625 41 


150,059 81 


40,443 86 


576,803 59 


860,313 31 


4,154 56 


57 


1,820 00 


3,031 53 


93 67 


- 


4,595 97 


7,071 39 


- 


58 


- 


- 


996 35 


— 


2,782 19 


12,893 98 


- 


59 


4,526 00 


17,757 41 


3,917 21 


672 15 


28,080 57 


35,446 74 


- 


60 


- 


19,729 25 


1,012 02 


694 53 


17,060 64 


37,754 99 


- 


61 


294 13 


296 25 


259 29 


- 


1,633 80 


5,883 38 


- 


62 


- 


2,123 00 


418 74 


2,493 25 


3,668 60 


5,124 34 


- 


63 


— 


999 00 


495 50 


— 


525 91 


5,096 30 


— 


64 


678 33 


1,627 00 


27 89 


_ 


1,646 67 


2,754 26 


_ 


65 


249 81 


2,999 16 


464 10 


1,465 48 


631 93 


15,983 26 


1,058 30 


66 


1,565 93 


7,048 30 


3,334 33 


— 


2,092 48 


24,371 12 


- 


67 


1,172 98 


3,580 37 


221 89 


- 


6,857 72 


9,384 54 


2,162 14 


68 


14,309 42 


29,975 08 


9,947 26 


2,522 39 


55,657 45 


207,940 44 


- 


69 


— 


10,470 24 


459 44 


- 


11,637 77 


29,849 62 


— 


70 


- 


1,522 67 


— 


- 


4,030 42 


9,487 81 


- 


71 


612 25 


5,677 56 


75 00 


- 


1,579 19 


9,807 22 


- 


72 


- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


74 14 


— 


73 


— 


4,107 22 


157 95 


- 


2,025 96 


4,350 25 


_ 


74 


1,638 00 


4,476 97 


672 41 


440 12 


4,639 02 


9,832 81 


_ 


75 




556 33 


225 00 


~ 


232 34 


1,476 33 


~ 


76 



154 P.D. 17. 

Table XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving Poor 











Grand Total 


Total 


Ordinary 




CITIES AND 


IN INSTITUTIONS 




OUTSIDE 




TOWNS 


Expenditures 












In 


In Other 


In Private 


In Own 










Infirmaries 


Institutions 


Families 


Homes 


1 


Tyngsboro . . $9,933 68 


$9,933 68 


_ 


$718 53 


$240 00 


$6,015 31 


2 


Tyringham 




2,219 40 


2,219 40 


- 


482 75 


93 00 


600 85 


3 


Upton 




18,913 12 


18,913 12 


$2,551 00 


837 48 


_ 


4,770 29 


4 


Uxbridge 






37,839 94 


37,839 94 


5,999 82 


2,560 76 


- 


12,865 94 


5 


Wakefield 






64,997 01 


64,997 01 


7,400 80 


4,450 36 


3,208 95 


33,271 44 


6 


Wales 






1,504 59 


1,504 59 


- 


- 


- 


1,499 59 


7 


Walpole 






34,789 47 


34,789 47 


- 


4,047 79 


- 


17,084 90 


8 


Waltham 






392,713 35 


389,276 35 


16,762 81 


32,249 31 


- 


229,449 42 


9 


Ware 






49,576 47 


49,576 47 


4,432 38 


481 75 


- 


30,742 15 


10 


Wareham 






69,322 08 


69,322 08 


2,299 33 


3,578 53 


1,170 50 


33,337 88 


11 


Warren l 






18,131 58 


18,131 58 


1,722 46 


844 92 


1,604 20 


7,101 05 


12 


Warwick 






3,124 50 


3,124 50 


- 


626 75 


69 09 


1,048 34 


13 


Washington 




2,060 37 


2,060 37 


- 


666 71 


224 00 


— 


14 


Watertown 




226,410 79 


226,410 79 


6,059 20 


11,961 38 


6,570 23 


140,198 79 


15 


Wayland . 
Webster 




25,347 17 


25,347 17 


- 


918 76 


- 


15,604 69 


16 




74,428 46 


74,428 46 


10,314 29 


10,099 96 


— 


39,185 48 


17 


Wellesley . 




24,674 60 


24,674 60 


- 


2,598 66 


860 70 


11,806 34 


18 


Wellfleet . 




6,213 50 


6,213 50 


- 


- 


977 75 


2,048 49 


19 


Wendell . 




9,149 35 


9,149 35 


- 


351 88 


— 


6,977 19 


20 


Wenham . 




3,508 64 


3,508 64 


- 


190 00 


- 


1,299 14 


21 


West Boyston 1 




11,626 57 


11,626 57 


475 00 


2,187 65 


312 00 


4,175 01 


22 


West Bridgewater 


18,150 72 


18,150 72 


- 


3,736 05 


- 


7,600 51 


23 


West Brookfield 


8,232 22 


8,232 22 


414 90 


155 00 


123 00 


3,669 93 


24 


West Newbury . 


13,684 35 


13,684 35 


- 


1,010 35 


411 00 


5,222 40 


25 


West Springfield 
West Stockbridge 


161,585 68 


161,535 68 


- 


9,424 78 


7,310 06 


112,082 43 


26 


8,237 96 


8,237 96 


— 


158 00 


385 30 


4,969 41 


27 


West Tisbury . 


1,275 28 


1,275 28 


- 


207 00 


248 57 


475 52 


28 


Westborough 




25,848 93 


25,773 93 


3,959 98 


819 85 


652 98 


8,120 48 


29 


Westfield . 




99,132 47 


96,208 07 


11,095 75 


4,958 28 


366 00 


42,869 09 


30 


Westford . 




26,766 76 


25,420 32 


5,678 84 


— 


2,291 06 


10,762 41 


31 


Westhampton 




1,842 82 


1,842 82 


- 


277 76 


164 00 


190 81 


32 


Westminster x 




9,037 51 


9,037 51 


625 88 


591 50 


— 


3,666 98 


33 


Weston 




7,976 52 


7,976 52 


1,046 15 


1,970 71 


270 34 


2,401 88 


34 


Westport . 




19,753 15 


19,753 15 


4,558 05 


2,117 65 


1,181 74 


6,684 88 


35 


Westwood . 




10,564 16 


10,564 16 


- 


1,130 27 


155 00 


4,019 25 


36 


Weymouth 




235,700 67 


235,700 67 


6,399 94 


792 00 


4,988 69 


134.946 17 


37 


Whately . 




3,175 40 


3,175 40 


- 


- 


168 00 


1,897 55 


38 


Whitman . 




60,618 85 


60,618 85 


- 


4,314 32 


8,036 74 


25,229 94 


39 


Wilbraham 




12,512 32 


12,512 32 


- 


1,104 56 


1,063 21 


7,677 38 


40 


Williamsburg 




9,553 83 


9,553 83 


- 


46 66 


— 


4,198 83 


41 


Williamstown 




33,343 52 


33,343 52 


— 


490 00 


764 00 


21,034 36 


42 


Wilmington 




10,596 14 


10,596 14 


- 


1,792 50 


657 85 


4,538 04 


43 


Winchendon 




96,862 04 


96,862 04 


6,931 96 


4,145 53 


2,018 80 


67,582 44 


44 


Winchester 




22,433 15 


22,433 15 


- 


S08 70 


1,659 79 


6,454 19 


45 


Windsor . 




3,848 55 


3,848 55 


- 


- 


- 


3,155 21 


46 


Winthrop . 




61,757 85 


61,757 85 


- 


3,933 68 


3,153 05 


30,142 64 


47 


Woburn 




179,844 50 


179,844 50 


6,300 31 


10,575 16 


649 99 


104,422 51 


49 


Worcester . 




1,896,815 97 


1,876,925 03 


133,158 78 


8,386 90 


63,732 87 


1,196,494 34 


49 


Worthington 




1,544 50 


1,544 50 


- 


43 50 


371 00 


- 


50 


Wrentham 




16,922 91 


16,272 06 


3,680 76 


491 64 


- 


7,360 37 


51 


Yarmouth . 




29,516 91 


29,516 91 


- 


1,870 98 


2,823 70 


16,575 46 




Grand t 


otal 




. $41,371,183 34 


$41,290,337 00 


$2,284,447 12 


$1,457,581 32 


$768,206 66 


$25,750,727 08 



Charlton Home Farm Association. 



Pt. III. 

Persons in Institutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes 



155 



Concluded. 



Expenditures 


Receipts 




Extraordi- 
nary 
Expenditures 
on Account of 






Administra- 


On Account 
of Support or 


All 


Net Ordinary 
Expenditures 










Mothers' 
Aid 


Old Age 
Assistance 


tion 


Relief in 
Infirmaries 


Other 




Institutions 




$312 75 


$2,621 61 


$25 48 


_ 


$4,036 70 


$5,896 98 


_ 


! 


_ 


992 34 


50 46 


- 


456 10 


1,763 30 


- 


2 


2,271 64 


8,271 35 


211 36 


$58 15 


3,862 15 


14,992 82 


- 


3 


6,350 83 


7,478 34 


2,584 25 


10 00 


11,395 20 


26,434 74 


- 


4 


2,443 00 


10,526 71 


3,695 75 


1,782 72 


9,356 16 


53,858 13 


- 


5 


- 


- 


5 00 


- 


681 34 


873 25 


- 


6 


3,093 40 


8,738 59 


1,824 79 


- 


6,927 91 


27,861 56 


- 


7 


41,856 40 


58,012 78 


10,945 63 


1,053 30 


105,142 53 


283,080 52 


$3,437 00 


8 


3,468 18 


6,035 93 


4,416 08 


61 00 


7,072 34 


42,443 13 


- 


9 


212 50 


24,276 23 


4,447 11 


353 00 


14,345 36 


54,623 72 


- 


10 


- 


5,899 48 


959 47 


- 


5,588 «7 


12,542 91 


- 


11 


- 


1,196 00 


184 32 


- 


746 68 


2,377 82 


- 


12 


62 00 


605 71 


501 95 


- 


484 70 


1,575 67 


- 


13 


27,758 12 


21,396 24 


12,466 83 


73 20 


101,124 09 


125,213 50 


- 


14 


674 75 


6,147 21 


2,001 76 


- 


12,020 41 


13,326 76 


- 


15 


3,789 30 


8,363 47 


2,665 96 


2,499 58 


17,191 92 


54,736 96 


- 


16 


2,392 00 


6,617 74 


399 16 


— 


7,378 69 


17,295 91 


- 


17 


976 50 


2,210 76 


- 


- 


1,200 69 


5,012 81 


- 


18 


- 


1,577 20 


243 08 


- 


2,174 60 


6,974 75 


- 


19 


- 


1,989 50 


30 00 


- 


903 80 


2,604 84 


- 


20 


- 


4,020 34 


456 57 


- 


2,504 94 


9,121 63 


- 


21 


- 


5,960 28 


853 88 


- 


3,865 96 


14,284 76 


- 


22 


— 


3,637 39 


232 00 


- 


1,775 85 


6,456 37 


- 


23 


2,200 14 


4,403 04 


437 42 


- 


5,620 58 


8,063 77 


- 


24 


1,996 50 


19,526 04 


11,245 87 


- 


95,162 99 


66,422 69 


- 


25 


- 


2,595 50 


129 75 


- 


1,744 77 


6,493 19 


- 


26 


31 00 


224 98 


88 21 


- 


559 43 


715 85 


- 


27 


2,030 13 


9,054 48 


1,136 03 


62 00 


8,343 86 


17,368 07 


75 00 


28 


6,454 00 


21,425 76 


9,039 19 


520 85 


32,756 25 


62,930 97 


2,924 40 


29 


2,148 41 


3,611 74 


927 86 


612 18 


4,251 08 


20,557 06 


1,346 44 


30 


- 


1,210 25 


- 


- 


518 83 


1,323 99 


- 


31 


1,042 85 


3,010 57 


99 73 


- 


2,530 70 


6,506 81 


- 


32 


636 30 


791 80 


859 34 


- 


499 60 


7,476 92 


- 


33 


144 00 


3,575 52 


1,491 31 


- 


2,739 81 


17,013 34 


- 


34 


17 50 


4,513 00 


729 14 


- 


2,422 99 


8,141 17 


- 


35 


13,900 64 


66,605 11 


8,068 12 


108 00 


102,544 93 


133,047 74 


- 


36 


96 00 


1,013 85 


- 


- 


867 60 


2,307 80 


- 


37 


2,690 92 


19,305 56 


1,041 37 


- 


15,831 74 


44,787 11 


— 


38 


- 


1,707 17 


960 00 


- 


4,162 22 


8,350 10 


- 


39 


1,363 84 


3,874 50 


70 00 


- 


3,829 26 


5,724 57 


- 


40 


3,441 51 


6,486 97 


1,126 68 


- 


5,265 53 


28,077 99 


— 


41 


1,688 20 


1,620 00 


299 55 


— 


3,452 73 


7,143 41 


- 


42 


1,222 38 


11,647 85 


3,313 08 


2,366 18 


27,084 53 


67,411 33 


- 


43 


4,388 34 


6,247 65 


2,774 48 


— 


9,795 95 


12,637 20 


- 


44 


- 


653 34 


40 00 


- 


712 30 


3,136 25 


- 


45 


2,517 50 


16,450 37 


5,560 61 


- 


21,289 88 


40,467 97 


- 


46 


23,897 54 


24,910 31 


9,088 68 


161 35 


46,615 96 


133,067 19 


- 


47 


115,787 47 


191,898 00 


167,466 67 


8,572 32 


499,998 77 


1,368,353 94 


19,890 94 


48 


- 


1,130 00 


- 


- 


587 30 


957 20 


- 


49 


- 


4,447 00 


292 29 


59 00 


2,693 45 


13,519 61 


650 85 


50 


- 


6,688 84 


1,557 93 


- 


9,471 80 


20,045 11 


- 


51 


$2,916,468 78 


$5,922,323 23 


$2,184,582 81 


$223,518 31 


$9,007,733 95 


$32,059,084 74 


$80,846 34 





156 P.D. 17. 

Table XIII. — Net Cost to the State of Supporting and Relieving Poor Persons in 

Institutions and in Families. 

Aggregate $5,453,255 26 

. . . . 5,114,631 11 



Ordinary expenditures 
In institutions 

State Infirmary 

State Farm .... 

Massachusetts Hospital School 
Total, outside institutions 



$280,844 72 

1,320 58 

102,617 39 



$725,964 98 



4,388,666 13 



Extraordinary expenditures on account of institutions ...... 338,624 15 

Table XIV. — Total Net Cost of Public Poor Relief in Massachusetts during the 
Year ending March 31, 1935. 

Source of Relief 



Aggregate .... 
Ordinary expenditures : 

Total .... 

In institutions 

Outside .... 

Public Welfare administration 
Extraordinary expenditures : 

Total .... 

Account of institutions 

All other 



Cities 

and 

Towns 


State 


Total 


$32,139,931 08 


$5,453,255 26 


$37,593,186 34 


32,059,084 74 
3,393,554 13 

26,480,947 80 
2,184,582 81 


5,114,631 11 

725,964 98 

4,388,666 13 


37,173,715 85 
4,119,519 11 

30,869,613 93 
2,184,582 81 


80,846 34 
80,846 34 


338,624 15 
338,624 15 


419,470 49 
419,470 49 



State reimbursement for Old Age Assistance amounts to $2,148,356.86 for the year ending April 30, 1935, 
not included in above table. 



INDEX 



Adoptions of wards .............. 25 

Adoptions, Investigation of 26 

Adult poor provided tor in families, The settled ......... 61 

Advisory Board, Present members of .......... 1 

Aid and Relief. Division of ........... 4 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance ........... 15 

See Old Age Assistance, Bureau of. 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ........... 7 

See Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Relief ............. 4 

See Relief, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Settlements ............ 4 

See Settlements, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Social Service ........... 9 

See Social Service, Subdivision of. 

Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses ...... 6 

Appeal Board, Old Age Assistance ........... 20 

Audit 6 

Boarding homes for aged persons, Licensed. ......... 60 

Boarding homes for infants, Licensed. .......... 31 

Boys' Parole Branch ............. 36 

See Juvenile Training. Division of. 

Bridgewater, State Farm, Infirmary Department 46 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance ............ 15 

See Old Age Assistance, Bureau of. 

Burials ... ............ 6 

Canton, Massachusetts Hospital School .......... 46 

Capacity of Institutions ............. 53 

Charitable Corporations, Private ........... 68 

Child Guardianship, Division of ........... 20 

Adoptions of wards ............. 25 

Applications for discharge . . . . . . . . . . . 30 

Boarding homes, Summary of infants under two years of age reported in 32 

Children in care and custody of Division ......... 20 

Children in custody during year, Summary of all . . . . . . . 29 

Children over three years of age, Summary of ....... . 29 

Children under three years of age, Summary of ........ 28 

Collections for support received from cities and towns and directly from parents . . 28 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children .... 30 

Disposition by the courts of neglected children ........ 31 

Disposition of ehildren held on temporary mittimi ....... 30 

Infant Mortality rate ............ 21 

Investigation of Adoptions ............ 26 

Investigation, Subdivision of .......... . 23 

Licensed boarding homes for infants .......... 31 

Licensed maternity hospitals ........... 33 

Localities from which children were received ........ 31 

Status of children ............. 30 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the Department ..... 35 

Children with settlement provided for in infirmaries, Dependent minor ..... 63 

Children with settlement provided for outside of infirmaries, Dependent minor ... 62 

City and Town infirmaries, The ........... 128 

See Infirmaries, The city and town. 

Cities and towns, Penalty incurred for failure to make returns during the month of April, 1935 63 

Commissioner of Public Welfare, Report of ........ 2 

County Training Schools, The 60 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence ......... 60 

Hampden County Training School, Springfield ........ 60 

Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford ....... 60 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale ........ 60 

Crippled children, Social Service for ........... 33 

Dangerous diseases ............. 5 

Delinquent and wayward children, Disposition by the courts of cases of ... 30 

Department of Public Welfare: 

Advisory Board ............. 1 

Principal duties of ............ . 3 

Report of Commissioner ............ 2 

Department's finances, The ............ 66 

Dependent minor children: 

Settlement provided for in infirmaries . .... .... 63 

Ssttlement nrovided for outside of infirmaries ........ 62 

Discharge of children, Applications for. .......... 30 

Division of Aid and Relief ............ 4 

See Aid and Relief, Division of. 

Division of Child Guardianship ... .... 20 

See Child Guardianship, Division of. 



158 P.D. 17. 

Division of Juvenile Training .... ...... 36 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 

Divisions of the Department .... ..... 1 

Duties of the Department ............ j 3 

Finances, The Department's ............. 66 

Girls' Parole Branch ............. 37 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 

Hospital School at Canton, Massachusetts .......... 46 

Hospitals, Licensed maternity .........'.'.". 33 

Housing and Town Planning ............ 39 

See Town Planning. 

Housing experiment at Lowell ............ 43 

Housing State Board of, * 42 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley ........... 50 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster .......... 52 

Infant mortality rate # ............ .' 21 

Infants, Licensed boarding homes for .........'." 31 

Infants under two years of age, Summary of boarding homes ....'.'. 32 

Infirmary, State .............. 44 

Infirmary department at State Farm, Bridge water ........ 46 

Infirmaries, Dependent minor children with settlement provided for in . . . . . 63 

Iafirmaries, The city and town ............ 128 

Construction, new and contemplated . . 128 

Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 

Infirmaries closed 128 

Inspection of ............. 128 

Laws relating to ............ 128 

Recommendations made ............ 129 

Reports from 131 

Visitors , . 129 

Institutions, Supervision of _ . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 

Capacity, population and inventory . . . . . . . . . 53 

Institutions under supervision of the Department ........ 1 

Expenditures 56 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley .......... 50 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster .......... 52 

Infirmary Department of State Farm, Bridgewater ....... 48 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough ......... 48 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton ......... 46 

Payroll 59 

Per capita cost . 58 

Receipts ............... 55 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury ........... 44 

Investigation of Adoptions ............ 26 

Investigation, Subdivision of . . . . . . . . . . . 23 

Juvenile Training, Division of ........... . 36 

Boys' Parole Branch . . . . . . . . • . . . . . 36 

Girls' Parole Branch ............. 37 

Lancaster, State Industrial School for Girls ......... 52 

Laws of 1935 affecting the Department: 

Establishing a Special Commission to Study and Revise the Laws Relating to Public 

Welfare 64 

Requiring Notice in Writing in Order to Establish Municipal Liability for Relief of Needy 

Persons in Certain Cases ........... 64 

Relative to Funds Received by the Director of the Division of Aid and Relief for the Benefit 
of Persons under the Care and Supervision of the Department of Public Welfare and 

Providing for the Bonding of Said Director . , ...... 64 

Relative to the Acceptance and Expenditure of Certain Federal Funds under the Social Se- 
curity Act, so called, and Changing the Residence Requirements for Mothers' Aid and Old 

Age Assistance so far as Necessary to Obtain Said Funds 65 

Legislation, Recommendations for: 

Changing the name of the State Infirmary .... > .... . 63 

Patients' Funds at the State Infirmary and disposition of unclaimed property of former 

patients . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 

Licensed boarding homes for infants ........... 31 

Licensed boarding homes for aged persons .......... 60 

Localities from which new children were received . ... ... . . 31 

Lowell, Housing experiment at . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough .......... 48 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton .......... 46 

Massachusetts Training Schools, Trustees of ........ 48 

Maternity hospitals, Licensed ............ 33 

Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of ........... . 7 

Duration of Mothers' Aid Cases ........... 

Number of cases active at end of each year ......... 

Reasons for closing cases ............ 8 

Reopened cases ............. 8 

State appropriations to date ........... 

Statistics ............... 7 

Neglected Children, Disposition of, by the courts ........ 31 

Old Age Assistance, Bureau of ............ 15 

Appeal Board ............... 20 



Pt. I. 159 

PAGE 

Statistics 17 

Physical Handicaps, Children with 34 

Planning Board Activities ............ 41 

Poor relief, Penalty lor lailure to make returns of ....... 63 

Poor relief, Statistics of . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 

Private charitable corporations ........... 68 

Annual reports of ............ . 69 

Endorsement of ............ . 70 

Inspection of ............. 69 

Investigation of, seeking incorporation ......... 68 

Number and classification of ....... . . . 69 

Summary of statistical returns ........ . . 71 

Relief, Subdivision of 

Audit 6 

Burials ............... 6 

Dangerous diseases ............. 5 

Removals .............. 6 

Shipwrecked seamen ............. 5 

Sick State poor ............. 5 

Temporary aid .............. 4 

Vocational education ............ 6 

Removals of poor persons . ........... 6 

Report of the Commissioner of Public Welfare ......... 2 

Settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towas, Supervision of .... 61 

Dependent minor children in infirmaries ......... 63 

Dependent minor children outside of infirmaries ........ 62 

Penalty for failure to make returns .......... 63 

Settled adult poor provided for in families ......... 61 

Settlements, Subdivision of ........... . 4 

Shipwrecked Seamen ............. 5 

Shirley, Industrial School for Boys ........... 50 

Sick State poor _. . _ . . . . . . . . ^ . . . 5 

Social Service for crippled children ........... 33 

Social Service, Subdivision of ........... . 9 

Applications for transportation ........... 13 

Chaplain's Service ............. 11 

Children 11 

General summary ............. 15 

Men . 9 

Men admitted to the State Infirmary .......... 14 

Men discharged from the State Infirmary ......... 14 

Social Service for men ............ 14 

Statistics 13, 14, 15 

Summary of court work ............ 14 

Summary of placement work ........... 15 

Supervision and placement ........... 11 

Transients and homeless 12 

Women ............ . . 10 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary ....... 13 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary ...... 14 

State Board of Housing 42 

See Housing, State Board of 

State Farm, Bndgewater, Infirmary department at ....... 46 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury ............ 44 

Statistics of poor relief 128-156 

Cost 137 

Numbers relieved ............. 135 

Subdivision of Investigation ............ 23 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ............ 7 

Subdivision of Relief ............. 4 

Subdivision of Settlements .:.......'... 4 

Subdivision of Social Service ............ 9 

Supervision of institutions ............ 53 

Supervision of the settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns .... 61 

Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses ....... 6 

Temporary aid .............. 4 

Tewksbury, State Infirmary ............ 44 

Town Planning 39 

Cities and towns which have been zoned ......... 42 

Planning board activities .........••> 41 

Zoning ............... 39 

Training Schools, County ............ 60 

Training Schools, Massachusetts ......... . 48 

Trustees, Massachusetts Hospital School ........ • 46 

Trustees, Massachusetts Training Schools .......... 48 

Trustees, State Infirmary .......... . 44 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the department . . . 35 

Vocational education ......... 6 

Wayfarers' lodges and cheap lodging houses, Supervision of .6 

Westborough, Lyman School for Boys .... 48 

Zoning ................ 39 



... 



Public Document No. 17 



€l>e €ommontoeaftf) of ffia$$atfyu$ttt# 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT 



OF 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

FOR THE 

Year Ending November 30, 1936 
PARTS I, II, AND III 




Publication of this Document appkoved by the Commission on Administbation and Finance 
2700. 8-'37 Order 1442. 






"** 2 193/ 



4I,S 




®fje Commonttjeaitf of JWastfadfmsett* 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Walter V. McCarthy, Commissioner 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives: 

The Seventeeth Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare, covering 
the year from December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936, is herewith respectfully 
presented. 

Members of the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Welfare 

Date of Original Date of 

Appointment Name Residence Expiration 

Dec. 10, 1919 George Crompton Worcester .... Dec. 1, 1939 

Dec. 1, 1937 
Dec. 1, 1938 
Dec. 1, 1938 
Dec. 1, 1937 
Dec. 1, 1939 



July 1, 1931 Harry C. Solomon, M.D. . . . Boston 

Dec. 1, 1935 Mary T. Roberts Chestnut Hill 

Dec. 1, 1935 Anna E. Pigeon Belmont 

Jan. 15, 1936 Morris Bronstein Boston 

Dec. 1, 1936 Frederick P. Schmid Boston 

Divisions of the Department of Public Welfare 

Boston 
Division of Aid and Relief: Room 30, State House 
Frank W. Goodhue, Director 
Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor of Social Service 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Mothers' Aid 
Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor of Settlements 
j ~>hn B. Gallagher, Supervisor of Relief 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance: 15 Ashburton Place 
Francis Bardwell, Superintendent 

Division of Child Guardianship: Room 43, State House 
Miss Winifreu A. Keneran, Director 

Division of Juven^e Training: 41 Mt. Vernon Street 
Charles M. Davenpt -t, Director 
v7?Uer C. Bell, Executive Secretary 

Miss rJmeda F. Cree, Superintendent, Girls' Parole Branch 
C. Frederick Gilmore, Superintendent, Boys' Parole Branch 

Subdivision of Jr. t vate Incorporated Charities: 15 Ashburton Place 
Miss Florence G. b, kson, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Alice M. Mclntirt, Supervisor of Incorporated Charities 
Miss Mary C. Robinson, (supervisor of Incorporated Charities 

Subdivision of Town Planning: 14 Beacon Street 

Edward T. Hartman, Visitor to City and Town Planning Boards 

Subdivision of Crippled Children: Room 549, State House 
Miss Margaret MacDonald, Supervisor 

Institutions under the Supervision of the Department of Public Welfare 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. Lawrence K. Kelley, M.D., Superintendent 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton. John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. Charles A. DuBois, Superintendent 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. George P. Campbell, Superintendent 
Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superin- 
tendent \ j ,, : l°* •" ! 

State Board of Housing: 209 Washington Street' °" ' ' 

Sidney T. Strickland, Chairman 



2 P.D. 17 

PART I 
REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

During the past year, social legislation has been enacted in this state which is so 
far reaching in its scope that a resume of the events that lead up to its enactment 
is well worth recording. The Legislature of 1935 created a Special Recess Com- 
mission (Chapter 56 of the Resolves of 1935) to study and revise the laws relating 
to public welfare. The scope of the Commission' survey was further amplified by 
the passage of Chapter 60 of the Resolves of 1935, which referred all matters in 
House Bill Number 2144 of 1935, a bill proposing certain changes in the Old Age 
Assistance Law, to the attention of the Commission. The Commission submitted 
its report to the General Court in accordance with the provisions of said Resolves 
on the first Wednesday of December, 1935. 

The personnel of the Commission was as follows: Honorable Theodore R. 
Plunkett of Adams, designated by the President of the Senate; Representative 
John W. Lasell of Northbridge, Representative James A. Gunn of Montague, 
Representative Roland D. Sawyer of Ware, designated by the Speaker of the House; 
and Mr. Walter V. McCarthy of Boston, Mr. Charles B. Campfield of Boston, Mr- 
Wendell P. Thore of Quincy, designated by His Excellency, the Governor. Mr. 
William H. McMasters of Cambridge served as Secretary of the Commission. 

Public meetings were held in the following cities: Greenfield, Springfield, North 
Adams, Pittsfield, Fitchburg, Worcester, Lowell, Lawrence, Haverhill, Lynn, 
Taunton, Brockton, New Bedford, Fall River and Boston. 

As the basis for its report, the Commission heard many officials and lay persons 
in different sections of the Commonwealth. It was the opinion of the Commission 
after very careful consideration of all the recommendations made, that the following 
specific changes in the law were vitally necessary to meet the social, industrial and 
economic conditions throughout the Commonwealth. 

Changes Recommended 

1. Immediate reduction to the age of sixty-five in Old Age Assistance. 

2. Old age beneficiaries to receive a minimum of $30 per month, to be paid in 
weekly instalments, by check or cash, from the city or town where the beneficiary 
resides. In cases where a married couple have both reached the age of sixty-five, 
and are living together, the combined minimum amount shall be $45, instead of $30 
per month each. 

3. A state appeal board of three to be set up, to consist of the Superintendent of 
the Bureau of Old Age Assistance, and two other members, one man and one woman, 
from each of the two major political parties, who shall be appointed by the Governor 
for a term of four years, except in the initial appointment, which shall consist of a 
term of two years for one of the appointees, succeeding appointments to be four 
years each. The findings of this appeal board shall be mandatory. The salaries of 
the two appointed members shall be $1,000 per year, and funds for travel and other 
necessary expenses of the board shall be recommended by the Commissioner of 
Public Welfare. The duties of the board will be to settle all disputes in the matter 
of eligibility of those seeking old age assistance, and to acquaint applicants with 
their rights under the law. 

4. The words "and others" in the present law, involving support of aged people? 
shall be deleted, and on the question of children supporting their parents the words 
"or contribute to the support of" shall be added. The purpose of these changes 
will be to eliminate so far as possible disputes involving support of aged people by 
any one except their children to make contributions to the support of parents as 
reasonable as possible. 

It was the opinion of Mr. Campfield and Mr. Thore, members of the Commission, 
that the so-called "Support Your Parents" clause should be eliminated. 

5. The elimination of aivy stated "equity" provision in connection with real estate 
owned by an ^ppifcarit tfdr^pld age assistance. ■■ l£ t is generally agreeed that the 
matter of "equity"' is Hard to determine and may work a severe hardship in some 
instances. As an offset to the elimination of an "equity" in real estate, it is recom- 



Pt. I. 3 

mended that a lien be laid, to run in favor of the city or town against the property- 
owned by the beneficiary, this lien to be in the form of a mortgage bond. It is 
recommended that if a beneficiary has an insurance policy of not over $1,000, the 
policy may be continued in force, provided it has been in effect for at least five 
years prior to application for old age assistance. The beneficiary must be either the 
surviving spouse or the estate of the aged person, and not some individual who 
might receive the benefits of the policy to the detriment of the city or town that 
has provided old age assistance. 

6. That a law be passed which will operate against the transfer of property at 
any time within five years before the date of application for old age assistane, if it 
is determined that this transfer was made for the mere purpose of establishing 
eligibility. 

7. The provisions of the National Social Security Act, to reimburse states one- 
half of the amount paid for old age assistance to its citizens up to a maximum of 
$30 per month, is the determining factor in the recommendation of the Commission 
that the minimum amount in Massachusetts shall be set at $30 per month. 

The original idea of old age assistance in Massachusetts was that the State 
should assume full responsibility. The fact is that the funds have been provided 
by the various cities and towns with certain reimbursements from the State. 
Drastic changes are necessary. At present, the State reimburses cities and towns 
one-third of the amount paid by them to their aged people under the Old Age 
Assistance Law. The Commission recommends that the State hereafter shall 
reimburse the cities and towns two-thirds of the net amount paid out by the local 
units. 

Proposed Changes in Mothers' Aid Law 

In the matter of the Mothers' Aid Law, Chapter 118 of the General Laws, the 
Commission recommended the following changes: 

1. The law should be made mandatory, as required by the Federal Social Se- 
curity Act, section 402 (a) (1). 

2. A State appeal board, as required by section 402 (4). 

3. Enlarge the scope of the law to include aid for dependent children as defined 
in section 406 (a). 

4. Specify that "aid to dependent children" means money payments with respect 
to a dependent child or dependent children, as stated in section 406 (b). 

5. In the matter of reimbursements to cities and towns in mother's aid cases, 
the Federal Social Security Act is to pay the State one-third of the amount. The 
Commission recommended, therefore, that the State shall reimburse the city or 
town two-thirds of the balance. This will make the final distribution three-ninths 
by the Federal Government, four-ninths by the State and two-ninths by the local 
unit. 

The Commission did not feel that it was necessary to make suggestions regarding 
relief outside of the old age assistance and mothers' aid. 

The legislation recommended by the Department and enacted into law in the 
closing days of the legislative session of 1935 proved to be inadequate to conform 
completely with the provisions of the Social Security Act, so-called — Title I — ■ 
Grants to States for Old Age Assistance, and Title IV — Grants to States for Aid to 
Dependent Children. However, legislation recommended by the Recess Commission, 
together with certain amendments proposed by the Department, resulted in the 
passage of Chapter 436 of Acts of 1936, An Act Relative to the Old Age Assistance 
Law, so-called, approved June 30, 1936, and Chapter 413, An Act Extending the 
Provisions of Law Providing for Aid to Mothers with Dependent Children, approved 
June 24, 1936, bringing these statutes into conformity with the Federal statute. 

The amended Old Age Assistance Law, which became effective September 1, 1936, 
reduced the age qualification for eligibility from seventy years to sixty-five years; 
made specific provision for reports to the Social Security Board; designated the 
Commissioner of Public Welfare, ex officio, a member of the Appeal Board, and 
enlarged the scope of said Board with respect to specific matters subject to appeal; 
removed certain restrictions on the ownership of property with provisions for the 



4 P.D. 17. 

furnishing of a bond and mortgage in cases where the equity exceeded $2,000; 
provided a penalty in cases of fraud or deception; disqualified persons for assistance 
under certain conditions where transfer of property is involved; provided for pay- 
ment of Federal funds by the Commonwealth to the cities and towns and reimburse- 
ment by the Commonwealth from State funds of two-thirds of the remainder of 
disbursements by the cities and towns in settled cases; and granted applicants a 
choice of applying for assistance under this chapter and/or other relief chapters if 
eligible for assistance under such other chapters. 

Aid To Dependent Children Law 

Under the amended Aid to Dependent Children Law, the following definitions 
were used for purposes of the chapter: "Dependent child", a child under the 
age of sixteen who has been deprived of parental support or care by reason of the 
death, continued absence from home or physical or mental incapacity of a parent, 
and who is living with his father, mother, grandfather, grandmother, brother, 
sister, stepfather, stepmother, stepbrother, stepsister, uncle or aunt in a place of 
residence maintained by one or more of such relatives as his or their own home, 
whether or not they or any of them have a settlement within the Commonwealth. 

"Parent" shall include any relative described in the paragraph of the section 
defining "Dependent child", in respect to dependent children in his or her care or 
custody. 

Provision was made for the submission of reports to the Social Security Board; 
for an appeal board, with the same character of set-up and with powers and duties 
consistent with those assigned to the Old Age Assistance appeal board; and for 
payment of Federal funds by the Commonwealth to the cities and towns and re- 
imbursement by the Commonwealth from State funds of one-third of the total 
amount disbursed by the several cities and towns. This provision of law, in effect, 
eliminates the question of legal settlement in so far as such settlement relates to 
matters of reimbursement; provides a penalty in cases of fraud or deception, and 
grants applicants a choice of applying for assistance under this chapter and/or 
other relief chapters if eligible for assistance under such other chapters. The effec- 
tive date of this law shall be January 1, 1937. 

In keeping with the many legislative changes in the two laws in question, it was 
necessary to revise the Rules Relating to the Administration of the laws; also re- 
visions were necessary in relation to Rules Relative to Notice and Reimbursement. 

The Massachusetts laws as amended, relating to Old Age Assistance and Aid 
to Dependent Children, and the State plan of administration of these laws were 
finally approved by the Social Security Board and Federal funds were allocated 
to the Commonwealth from February 1, 1936 for Old Age Assistance and from 
April 1, 1936 for Aid to Dependent Children. 

Crippled Children 

As a result of many conferences with the Commissioner of Public Health and 
members of his staff, the Superintendent of the Massachusetts Hospital School, 
the Supervisor of Social Service for Crippled Children, of the Department, field 
representatives from the United States Children's Bureau and the Commissioner 
of Public Welfare, it was agreed that the responsibility for the State's program for 
crippled children in conjunction with the United States Children's Bureau, oper- 
ating under the provisions of the Social Security Act, should be assumed by the 
Department of Public Health. 

Child Welfare Services 

Under the Social Security Act, Title V, Part 3 — Child Welfare Services — a plan 
for developing services to dependent and neglected children in certain rural sections 
of the Commonwealth was presented to the United States Children's Bureau. 
The plan was immediately approved and Federal funds were allotted to the De- 
partment to carry the plan forward. 

An area comprising twenty-six towns in Southern Worcester County was selected 
for the purpose of an initial demonstration, with headquarters established at South- 
bridge under the direction of a supervisor and three staff workers. In the early 



Pt. I. 5 

months of the experiment the work was primarily educational in scope. Results 
achieved to date prove the wisdom of the premises upon which the demonstration 
was based. Most heartening has been the co-operation extended to the staff by 
local officials and lay persons in the several communities being served. The pro- 
gram calls for an extension of the service to other sections of the Commonwealth 
in time. 

The Federal relief program has moved along rapidly in the past year and all signs 
seem to indicate "the Government is in to stay." 

With the Federal Government now definitely participating in several of the 
major fields of relief, through grants-in-aid to the Commonwealth, a new partner 
has been added to the traditional Massachusetts partnership — the State with its 
cities and towns. In this new partnership the Department assumes its ever-in- 
creasing responsibilities with a full appreciation of the opportunities afforded for 
sound and thoughtful leadership. 

Duties of the Department of Public Welfare 

The State Department of Public Welfare has the following principal duties : 

1. Supervision over the five state institutions of the Department: 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 
Massachusetts Hlspital School, Canton. 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. 
Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. 

2. Direction of public relief, both indoor and outdoor, given to unsettled persons 

by cities and towns. 

3. Supervision of mothers' aid rendered by cities and towns. 

4. Supervision of old age assistance rendered by cities and towns. 

5. Care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and dependent children coming 

into the custody of the Department through court commitment or otherwise. 

6. Institutional custody and treatment of juvenile offenders committed by the 

courts to the three State Training Schools, and the care of these children in 
families when on parole. 

7. General supervision of the work of the city and own planning boards. 

8. Visitation and inspection of private incorporated charitable agencies; investiga- 

tion of petitions for the incorporation of private charities; and the require- 
ment and reception of annual returns from domestic and foreign charitable 
trusts and from foreign charitable corporations. 

Among the other supervisory and inspectional duties of the Department may be 
mentioned the following : 

1. Visitation and inspection of city and own infirmaries. 

2. Visitation and inspection of the five county training schools. 

3. Visitation and investigation of care given to all children supported by the 

several cities and towns. 

4. Visitation and investigation of care given to all adults supported in families, 

other than their own, by cities and towns. 

5. Reception and classification of the annual returns of cities and towns relative 

to poor persons supported and relieved and the cost thereof. 

6. Visitation and inspection of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses. 

7. Investigation of legal settlement of persons, possibly state charges, who have 

been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, and of sane inmates 
of state institutions. 

8. Sending poor persons to the places within and without the Commonwealth 

where they belong. 

9. Investigation of petitions for adoption of children under fourteen years. 

10. Execution of the laws concerning infants and the licensing of infant boarding 
houses. 



6 P.D. 17. 

11. Licensing maternity hospitals. 

12. Licensing boarding homes for the aged. 

13. Supervision of annual census of physically handicapped children and social 

service for physically handicapped children, especially for those unable to 
attend school. 

14. Investigation of housing conditions, promotion of housing projects and super- 

vision of housing corporations by the State Board of Housing. 

Walter v. McCarthy, 

Commissioner of Public Welfare. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director 

The Division of Aid and Relief includes five subdivisions: Subdivision of Settle- 
ments, Subdivision of Relief, Subdivision of Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of Social 
Service, and Bureau of Old Age Assistance. 

The reports of the supervisors of these subdivisions and of the Superintendent 
of Old Age Assistance are herewith submitted. 

Subdivision of Settlements 

Edward F Morgan, Supervisor 

The subdivision of settlements investigates the settlements of patients admitted 
to the State Infirmary, State Farm (infirmary department), State sanatoria, and 
the Massachusetts Hospital School, and generally supervises the settlement work 
of the division. There were 3 persons remaining in the infirmary department of 
the State Farm on November 30, 1936. These patients cannot be removed because 
of their physical condition. The facilities of the infirmary department are no longer 
available for the admission of dependent persons from cities and towns. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year in the exami- 
nation and investigation of settlements of inmates of the state institutions: 



Institutions 
State Infirmary .... 

State Farm 

Lakeville State Sanatorium 
North Reading State Sanatorium 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Massachusetts Hospital School . 



Totals 









' Settle- 


No 


Orders 


Total 


Examina 


_ 


Orders 


ments 


Settle- 


With- 


Cases 


tions 




Issued 


Found 


ment 


drawn 


Returned 


3,747 




1,297 


783 


192 


23 


998 


12 




10 


7 


1 


1 


9 


207 




168 


167 


31 


— 


198 


214 




171 


168 


48 


— 


216 


268 




210 


220 


59 


— 


279 


113 




81 


81 


19 


— 


100 


12 




10 
1,947 


13 


3 


- 


16 


4,573 


1,439 


353 


24 


1,816 


November 


30 


1935 




. 611 






November 


30 


1936 




742 







Subdividion of Relief 

John B. Gallagher, Supervisor 

The subdivision of relief supervises public relief rendered by boards of public 
welfare and boards of health to persons, in their own homes and in hospitals, who 
have no settlement. 

The subdivision also investigates, upon the request of the Division of Vocational 
Education, the circumstances of persons receiving vocational training, who apply 
for aid during rehabilitation. 

Temporary Aid (General Laws, ch. 117, Sect. 18. — Cities and towns are author- 
ized by statute to furnish adequate assistance to poor persons having no lawful 
settlements, if so ordered by the Department of Public Welfare. 

On December 1, 1935, there were 27,950 continued cases including 111,800 
persons, and during the year 33,177 notices were received from 316 cities and towns 
concerning 132,708 persons. 



Pt. I. 









Causes 


of Aid 










1934 


1935 


1936 




1934 


1935 


1936 


Illness . 
Desertion 
Widowhood . 
Old Age 
Unemployment 
Insufficient income 
Husband in correction? 
institution 


1,542 

604 

1,056 

202 

29,838 

3,568 

il 

187 


1,681 

491 

721 

268 

31,951 

5,374 

178 


1306 

273 

433 

205 

27,029 

3,722 

114 


Orphans . 

Insanity 

Blindness 

Non-support 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 


14 

40 

6 

108 

3 


17 
14 
20 

85 


13 
21 
10 
51 


37,168 


40,800 


33,177 



The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for current 
and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts reimbursed 
for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated: 



Year 



1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 (January 

1927-28 (July 

1928-29 (July 

1929-30 (July 

1930-31 (July 

1931-32 (July 

1932-33 (July 

1933-34 (July 

1934-35 (July 

1935-36 (July 



1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 
1 to June 30) 





Number of 




Number of 


Persons in 


Amounts 


Cases 


Families 


Reimbursed 


2,847 


12,339 


$48,192 85 


3,131 


13,434 


63,203 05 


4,848 


20,714 


108,337 29 


7,305 


32,056 


178,762 28 


5,165 


21,043 


159,205 53 


5,664 


22,258 


227,831 59 


4,358 


17,701 


261,217 44 


3,756 


15,668 


311,148 30 


3,223 


13,313 


334,565 05 


8,093 


32,372 


635,585 63 


6,472 


29,124 


586,296 43 


4,320 


19,370 


432,334 70 


5,765 


27,279 


642,439 34 


6,182 


28,429 


661,219 39 


5,584 


25,720 


622,301 80 


4,118 


18,611 


398,301 80 


6,406 


30,428 


888,745 85 


7,099 


27,126 


1,006.895 72 


8,639 


35,481 


1,183,672 28 


16,352 


69,496 


2,079,341 45 


27,465 


116,726 


3,145,764 37 


45,368 


183,740 


4,437,503 20 


51,494 


205,976 


3,696,664 71 


60,585 


242,340 


3,442,242 16 


64,519 


258,076 


- 



Chapter 121, section 42, of the General Laws (Ter. Ed.) provides that claims 
against the Commonwealth shall be rendered to the department on or before the 
first day of October annually and shall be for the twelve months ending on the 
thirtieth day of June preceding. 

Shipwrecked Seamen (General Laws, ch. 102, sect. 5). — During the year no notices 
were received. 

Sick State Poor (General Laws, ch 122, sects. 17, 18). — The sick law provides 
that no persons shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be en- 
dangered by removal. 

Cities and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons having no legal 
settlement who are ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled hospitals, 
infirmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided such persons are 
not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when applying for 
assistance. 

On December 1, 1935, there were 287 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from 239 cities and towns concerning 11,756 persons repre- 
represented as too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases (General Laws, ch. Ill, sect. 116). — The law provides that 
a board of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the board of public welfare, 
of any person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public Health as 
dangerous to the public health. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the family is furnished by the 
board of public welfare, unless the family is quarantined as provided in General 
Laws, chapter 111, sect. 95, in which event the board of health furnished all aid 



8 P.D. 17. 

required. In hospital cases, reimbursement by the Commonwealth is governed by 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 122, section 18. 

On December 1, 1935, there were 209 continued cases, and during the year notices 
were received from boards of health of 117 cities and towns concerning 2,031 persons 
ill with diseases declared dangerous to the public health. 

Burials (General Laws, ch. 117, sect. 17). — The law provides that if the expense 
of burial is not paid by kindred "An amount not exceeding $40 for the funeral ex- 
penses of each person over 12 years of age, and not exceeding $20 for the funeral 
expenses of each person under that age, shall be paid by the Commonwealth; pro- 
vided that the board of public welfare shall file with each claim an affidavit of the 
undertaker stating the total amount of his bill, the amount received from the town, 
and the amount received from all other sourses, and provided, further, that if the 
total expense of the burial, by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum of $100 
no payment therefor shall be made by the Commonwealth." 

The number of burial claims received during the year was 600 from 89 cities and 
towns. 

Vocational Education (General Laws, ch. 74, sect. 22B). — The law provides that 
the Department of Public Welfare shall, upon request of the State Board of Vo- 
cational Education, make an investigation of the circumstances of persons actually 
in training afforded by said board, who apply for aid during rehabilitation, and 
shall make a report of its finding to said board. 

During the year 17 applications were received and investigated, of which 16 were 
approved. 

Audit 

The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account of cases 
of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, burial, old age assistance, 
and mothers with dependent children are shown in the following tabulation. It is 
to be noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from the total 
paid out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the appropriation in question. 
This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by this department 
are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which the audit is shown. 
For actual expenditures from these appropriations see page 72. 

Classes of Cases Bills Claims Allowances Deductions 

Temporary Aid . . . ' . . 34,406 $5,185,744 06 $3,700,000 15* $1,485,743 91 

Sick State Poor 6,887 167,662 27 139,999 88 27,662 39 

Dangerous Diseases 1,271 122,663 81 100,000 71 22,663 10 

Burial 426 11,359 84 8,999 73 2,360 11 

Mothers with Dependent Children . . 4,756 1,321,517 69 1,224,999 80 96,517 89 

Old Age Assistance 30,677 2,826,151 10 2,714,930 18 111,220 92 

Total . . . . . . 78,423 $9,635,098 77 $7,888,930 45 $1,746,168 32 

* Includes $6,841.32 for transportation of dependents. 

Removals 

The department is charged with the duty of removing sane poor persons to cities 
and towns within the Commonwealth, or, when not belonging in Massachusetts, 
to the state or place where they belong. The following table shows the removals 
made during the year. 

1934 1935 1936 

To other countries 30 47 14 

To other states "..... 344 148 272 

To towns of residence . . 1,599 1,662 1,939 

1,973 1,857 2,225 

Supervision of Wayfarer's Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses 

There are still but two municipal lodging houses in the state known as Wayfarer's 
Lodges. Springfield, which last year showed a capacity for seventeen beds for men 
now maintains but seven. This house is but little used at present. The capacity 
of the Boston Welfarer's Lodge is still 174 beds. 

The other houses are either commercial or are supported by charitable corpor- 
ations and are located in Boston, Springfield, New Bedford and Fall River. Of 
these the commercial house, mostly in Boston, furnish 766. The houses supported 



Pt. I. 9 

by charitable corporations have a capacity of 762 beds. These with the accom- 
modations provided by the Boston and Springfield Wayfarer's Lodges brings the 
total to 1,709 beds. 

All these houses have been inspected by a representative of the Department, 
conditions in the great majority of cases found satisfactory and records kept as 
required by local authorities. 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid 

(General Laws, Chapter 118) 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor 

Statistics 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, on December 1, 1935, there were 4,418 mothers 
with 12,677 dependent children under sixteen years of age receiving Mothers' Aid. 
They were classified as follows : 

A. Classified as to legal settlement : 

1. Without legal settlement: 

706 mothers with 1,993 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement : 

3,712 mothers with 10,684 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood : 

1. Widows: 

3,131 mothers with 8,721 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

1,287 mothers with 3,956 dependent children. 

Note: The 1,287 living husbands classified as follows: 
581 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
144 were insane, and 
437 had chronic illness. Of these 
155 had tuberculosis and 
282 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
385 were deserting husbands. 
244 were divorced or legally separated. 
77 were in jail. 

During the year 1,367 new cases were aided and 703 cases were closed, so that 
there were 5,082 mothers in receipt of Mothers' Aid at the close of the fiscal year 
(November 30, 1936). 

The new cases that were received during the fiscal year included 1,367 mothers 
with 4,020 dependent children, and were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement : 290 mothers with 882 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 1,077 mothers with 3,138 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 801 mothers with 2,356 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 566 mothers with 1,664 dependent children. 

Note: The 566 living husbands, classified as follows : 
256 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
43 were insane, and 
213 had chronic illness. Of these 



10 P.D. 17. 

73 had tuberculosis and 
140 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
142 were deserting husbands. 
123 were divorced or legally separated. 
45 were in jail. 

Of the 1,367 new Mothers' Aid cases 158 were reopened cases as follows: 

Families removed from one town to another, 26. Insufficient income, 97. Con- 
formity with policies, 25. Husband returned to institution, 2. Home re-established, 
2. Husband returned to jail, 3. Second husband died, 1. Legally separated from 
husband, 2. Total, 158. 

Reasons for closing Mothers' Aid cases: 

Sufficient income, 279. Applicant remarried, 59. Family moved. 38, Husband 
resumed support of family, 44. Non-conformity with policies, 46. Youngest child 
sixteen years of age, 129. Unfitness of mother, 48. Transferred to other sources of 
relief, 16. Applicant died, 24. Male lodger, 4. Applicant in hospital, 1*2. Un- 
suitable housing, 2. Only dependent child under sixteen years of age in hospital, 1. 
No dependent child under sixteen years of age at home, 1. Total, 703. 

Duration of Mothers' Aid cases closed between December 1, 1935 and November 30, 

1936: 

Less than 1 year, 200. Less than 2 years, 113. Less than 3 years, 81. Less than 
4 years, 64. Less than 5 years, 48. Less than 6 years, 34. Less than 7 years, 26. 
Less than 8 years, 25. Less than 9 years, 29. Less than 10 years, 18. Less than 11 
years, 16. Less than 12 years, 11. Less than 13 years, 12. Less than 14 years, 7. 
Less than 15 years, 11. Less than 16 years, 8. Total, 703. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, on December 1, 1936, there were 5,082 mothers 
with 14,110 dependent children under sixteen years of age receiving Mothers' Aid. 
They were classified as follows : 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

805 mothers with 2,248 dependent children. 
.2. With a legal settlement: 

4,277 mothers with 11,862 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 3,474 mothers with 9,510 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 1,608 mothers with 4,600 dependent children. 

Note: The 1,608 living husbands classified as follows: 
724 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
171 were insane, and 
553 had chronic illness. Of these 
194 had tuberculosis and 
359 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
447 were deserting husbands. 
334 were divorced or legally separated. 
103 were in jail. 

During the month of December, 1936, 110 mothers with 321 dependent children 
under sixteen years of age were added and 81 cases were closed, so that there were 
5,111 mothers with 13,288 dependent children in receipt of Mothers' Aid on De- 
cember 31, 1936. 

The cases that were received during December, 1936, were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 27 mothers with 87 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 83 mothers with 234 dependent children. 



Pt. I. 



11 



B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 73 mothers with 197 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 37 mothers with 124 dependent children. 

Note: The 37 living husbands classified as follows: 
12 were totally incapacitated, of whom 
1 was insane, and 
11 had chronic illness. Of these 
6 had tuberculosis and 
5 had diseases other than tuberculosis. 
10 were deserting husbands. 
12 were divorced or legally separated. 
3 were in jail. 



Number of Mothers 1 Aid Cases Active at End of Each Fiscal Year Since the 
Enactment of the Law of 1913 



Year 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 



Sept 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 1 

Dec. 1 

Dec. 1 



Cases 


Year 


2,334 


1922 


2,798 


1923 


3,035 


1924 


3,242 


1925 


3,366 


1926 


3,743 


1927 


3,330 


1928 


3,407 


1929 



1913, to 
1914, to 

1915, to 

1916, to 

1917, to 

1918, to 

1919, to 

1920, to 

1921, to 

1922, to 

1923, to 

1924, to 

1925, to 

1926, to 

1927, to 

1928, to 

1929, to 

1930, to 

1931, to 

1932, to 

1933, to 

1934, to 

1935, to 

1936, to 



Nov. 30, 1914 






Nov. 30, 1915 






Nov. 30, 1916 






Nov. 30, 1917 






Nov. 30, 1918 






Nov. 30, 1919 






Nov. 30, 1920 






Nov. 30, 1921 






Nov. 30, 1922 






Nov. 30, 1923 






Nov. 30, 1924 






Nov. 30, 1925 






Nov. 30, 1926 






Nov. 30, 1927 






Nov. 30, 1928 






Nov. 30, 1929 






Nov. 30, 1930 






Nov. 30, 1931 






Nov. 30, 1932 






Nov. 30, 1933 






Nov. 30, 1934 






Nov. 30, 1935 






Nov. 30, 1936 






Dec. 31, 1936 3 







Cases Year 






Cases 


3,371 1930 


. , 2,795 


3,072 1931 






2,982 


2,900 1932 






3,379 


2,870 1933 






3,912 


2,633 1934 






4,123 


2,592 1935 






4,418 


2,602 1936 






5,082 


2,603 Dec. 31 


, 1936 5,111 


ments for Mothers 


' Aid 


Appropriations 


Reimbursements 


$175,000 00 


$174,999 36 


250,000 00 


249,999 62 


300,000 00 


299,998 78 


400,000 00 


399,999 79 


475,000 00 


474,999 63 


550,000 00 


549,999 56 


775,000 00 


775,028 78 


900,000 00 


899,998 94 


850,000 00 


849,999 48 


900,000 00 


899,999 43 


950,000 00 


949,999 97 


1,080,000 00 


1,079,997 87 


900,000 00 


900,000 00 


850,000 00i 


359,967 34 2 


1,050,032 66i 


661,175 17 


861,857 49 


830,723 24 


871,134 25 


851,963 61 


899,170 64 


875,489 19 


948,681 45 


938,940 00 


1,109,741 45 


1,109,740 55 


1,050,000 90 


1,050,000 73 


1,065,000 17 


1,065,000 05 


1,225,069 59 


1,224,999 80 



1 Unexpended balance used for ensuing year. 

2 Affected by Chapter 241, Acts of 1920, which changed the period against the Commonwealth. 

3 To be included in report of fiscal year ending November 30, 1937. 



12 P.D. 17. 

Since September, 1913, we have familiarly referred to Chapter 763 of the Acts of 
1913, later Chapter 118 of the General Laws, Tercentenary Edition, as our "Moth- 
ers' Aid Law." Officially we can no longer do this, for the Legislature of 1936 
amended the law and from January 1, 1937, the effective date of the new act, we 
must learn to speak of the law as "The Aid to Dependent Children's Law." 

Our ideas of social justice, of the relationship of one man to another, and of 
society as whole to the individual have undergone great changes in the 300 years 
since the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Our present broad concep- 
tion of the duty of government with respect to dependent children is the result of a 
slow process of evolution during those three centuries. 

In Colonial days the town fathers made no special provision for dependent 
children. Young children deprived of parental care and support were thrust into 
the almshouse with aged and infirm paupers; older children were farmed out to 
work for their board. Later on orphan asylums were maintained v f or dependent 
children. 

In 1882, Massachusetts, a pioneer in this field, established a system of supervised 
foster homes for dependent, delinquent and neglected children committed to he 
care of the State and these foster homes proved to be a great improvement over 
children's institutions. 

It was not until 1913 that the principle that dependent children should be sup- 
ported at public expense, in their own homes under the care of their own mothers, 
was enacted into law in this state. The Mothers' Aid Law went into effect September 
1, 1913. It was a unique law in many respects, for it promulgated the principles of 
scientific case-work. 

Under this state-wide non-pauperizing relief law, weekly cash allowances were 
made available in sufficient amounts to enable needy mothers to bring up their 
dependent children properly in their own homes. In every city and town the Over- 
seers of the Poor (now the Board of Public Welfare) were charged with the duty of 
administering the Mothers' Aid Law and the State Board of Charity (now the State 
Department of Public Welfare) supervised the work done and the measures taken 
by the local boards. 

The Commonwealth agreed to reimburse the cities and towns for the full amount 
of aid rendered if the Mother aided had no legal settlement in any city or town, and 
for one-third of the aid rendered if she had a legal settlement within the Common- 
wealth. 

Hitherto, the Commonwealth assumed no financial responsibility for persons 
chargeable, by reason of legal settlement, to a city or town. Under this law the 
town and the Commonwealth established a partnership and they became jointly 
responsible for all Mothers' Aid families. 

State supervision has brought about a decided improvement in the administra- 
tion of all forms of public relief. Under the Mothers' Aid Law adequate weekly 
cash allowances have taken the place of inadequate doles and restricted grocery 
orders; social service has replaced disregard of the special needs and circumstances 
of members of aided families; medical and nursing care has been made available 
for mothers and their dependent children and the legal rights of families have been 
pressed. These include the prosecution of and securing support from deserting 
fathers, securing Workingmen's Compensation for persons injured in industry, and 
safeguarding inheritance rights. Opportunities for work for the able-bodied have 
been found, scholarships have been secured and Federal surplus food and clothing 
have been distributed. 

Better systems of case records and office management have been installed by 
local boards to meet the requirements of State supervision, and the employment 
of trained visitors under Civil Service rules has become the rule. 

Effective relief machinery has been established throughout the Commonwealth 
which has enabled communities to cope with emergencies as they arose — The World 
War — the influenza epidemic, floods and finally the great depression. 

The Mothers' Aid Law was a relief law. It provided adequate aid for a fit and 
needy mother of dependent children under sixteen years of age who had been de- 
prived of the support of her husband through his death or his total incapacity on 
account of chronic illness or insanity, or because of his imprisonment in jail for one 



Pt. I. 13 

year or more, or because of his divorce, legal separation or desertion. It was a 
child welfare measure. 

It was a good law as far as it went but it did not continue to provide for dependent 
children when they became deprived of their mother's care. If the mother died or 
became insane or if she remarried, the Mothers' Aid ceased. 

The 1936 legislature amended the Mothers' Aid Law (Chapter 413, Acts of 1936) 
so that it now applies not only to dependent children living with their own mothers, 
but it applies to any dependent child under the age of sixteen who has been de- 
prived of parental support or care by reason of the death, continued absence from 
home, or physical or mental incapacity of a parent, — who is living with his father 
or mother, grandfather, grandmother, brother, sister, stepfather, stepmother, 
stepbrother, stepsister, uncle or aunt — in a place maintained by one or more of 
such relatives as his or their own home. 

The title of the law was changed from Mothers' Aid Law to Aid to Dependent 
Children Law and certain other changes were made in order to make it conform to 
the Federal Social Security Act and make it possible for Massachusetts cities and 
towns to secure grants in aid for dependent children from the Federal Government, 

Subdivision of Social Service 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor 

The function of medical social service in a hospital is three-fold, (1) to interpret 
the patient, his environment and his social background to the doctor, who is thus 
enabled to see the whole person in relation to his present illness and future treat- 
ment; (2) to interpret the hospital and the doctor's recommendations to the patient 
and his family and to see that such recommendations are carried out; and (3) to 
cooperate with the health and social agencies of the community for the restoration 
of the health of the patient. Because the State Infirmary serves a particular group 
of needy people, the social workers have extended their service beyond the hospital 
to the rehabilitation, placement and supervision of patients in the community. 

The return of good times and increasing employment have not decreased the 
population at the State Infirmary. There were 621 more admissions (535 men and 
86 women) than last year, and on December 1, 1936, there were 173 more patients 
in the institution than on December 1, 1935. The total admissions were 3,924, and 
the daily average was 2,977 as against 2,904 in 1935. 

Because the admissions and discharges from the State Infirmary are the respon- 
sibility of this subdivision, it is concerned with the reasons for the increase in num- 
bers. As employment conditions improved in the spring, all able-bodied men were 
urged to seek work and transportation was provided to any place within the Com- 
monwealth. In Boston, if employment was not found immediately, arrangements 
were made with the Salvation Army, or with the Overseers of the Public Welfare, 
through its Homeless Men's Division, to aid the men until they obtained work, 
and similar requests went to other boards of public welfare. Hundreds of men were 
discharged, only to return a few weeks or months later because they could not 
find work, or did not want work, or were too irresponsible to hold a job. There has 
been no difficulty in finding employment for the women as soon as they are phy- 
sically and socially fit for the community. 

In analyzing the situation, a partial answer for the increse may be found in the 
following reasons: (1) The abolition of the Federal Transient Camps, which were 
havens for the homeless men needing assistance. (2) The increase in alcoholism. 
The Commission on Probation reports 90,866 arrests for drunkenness, an increase 
of 15,625 over the last year o;' prohibition. Four hundred thirteen (413) admissions 
were diagnosed as alcoholics, 86 more than in 1935 and 298 more than in 1934. 
(3) Men over forty-five years of age, having once lost their jobs, cannot meet the 
competition of younger men. (4) The farms on which many of the unskilled men 
always found work are not employing help because of reduced acreage and less 
stock. (5) The outstanding reason for the increase is the need for chronic hospital 
care. The State Infirmary is the only free chronic hospital in the Commonwealth. 
There are some free beds at the Holy Ghost Hospital, the Robert Brigham Hospital 
and the Boston Home for Incurables, but few in comparison with the need. The 



14 P.D. 17. 

chronic care given in private nursing homes is often inadequate and very expensive. 
Cities and towns are sending more patients to the State Infirmary with acknow- 
ledged local settlements because they need chronic hospital care. There were 370 
settled cases on December 1, 1936, compared with 256 on December 1, 1935, an 
increase of 114. 

Men 

The hospital wards for men (present census 400) are overcrowded because of the 
chronic and terminal illness of many patients who need bed care. The Annex wards 
are filled with the crippled and the blind; the House has the ambulatory, the aged 
and the infirm; Stonecroft is for those who are considered able-bodied and can help 
on the farm and in the work of the institution, and Bancroft, set apajt in the pines, 
serves only the tuberculous. 

Of the 3,149 admissions, 1,548 were readmissions and 1,047 were admissions from 
Boston. The majority were men between forty and sixty years of age. The pre- 
dominating diagnosis of men over forty years of age was arteriosclerosis, and of men 
under forty, tuberculosis and alcoholism; 355 had venereal disease, an increase of 
155 over 1935; and 241 had no disease. 

The social workers see all patients soon after they are admitted, to determine 
whether they can be of service in enabling the patient to adjust himself to hospital 
living. To unburden the patient of personal worries which might retard progress, 
the workers often investigate compensations, insurance and wages, as well as con- 
tact relatives. To relieve the long hours, the social workers acquaint the patient 
with the library service and arrange for the occupational therapist to interest the 
patient in handiwork. To give them spiritual consolation, they introduce the 
various chaplains. For those who are to return to the community, the service 
varies with the need. Employment was found for 70 men through the public and 
private employment agencies; arrangements were made for 100 men to receive 
assistance from local boards of public welfare and private agencies; Old Age Assis- 
tance was secured for 16 applicants, and transportation to other states was given 
to 16 men and to other countries to 2 men. After the men are rehabilitated, they 
frequently come to the office for advice, for assistance in obtaining second-hand 
clothing, or for a friendly visit. 

In order that the patients may have more individualized service,which the social 
workers are equipped to give with skill, intelligence and understanding, at least 
two more workers should be added to the staff. 

Childken 

On December 1, 1936, there were 180 children at the State Infirmary under 
twenty-one years of age — 92 boys and 88 girls. Sixty-four (64) were admitted be- 
tween the ages of sixteen and twenty; 33 between the ages of three and sixteen, and 
83 under three years of age. Of those between sixteen and twenty-one years, 15 
had venereal disease, 8 were pregnant, 7 were convalescing from confinement, 7 had 
tuberculosis, 12 were feeble-minded, 8 had chronic diseases, 4 had miscellaneous in- 
fections and 3 were well, awaiting social disposition. Of those between three and 
sixteen, 30 were feeble-minded, 2 had gonorrheal infection, and 1 had congenital 
syphilis. Of the babies, 10 were feeble-minded, 9 had otitis media, 11 had miscel- 
laneous diseases, and 50 were well, awaiting discharge with their mothers. Of the 
total number of 180 children, 53 were wards of the Division of Child Guardianship, 
13 were wards of the Industrial Schools, and 73 were either born at the State In- 
firmary or admitted with their mothers. 

Boards of public welfare have been asked not to send children under sixteen years 
of age to the State Infirmary without permission of the Director of the Division of 
Aid and Relief, because of the hazards of infection for children in a large adult 
hospital. It is felt that the children can be better cared for in local hospitals. It is 
of course necessary for the State Infirmary to provide for the care of a certain 
number of unplaceable feeble-minded wards of the Division of Child Guardianship, 
who must await admission to the schools for the feeble-minded, and a certain 
number of hydrocephalic and malformed children, who cannot remain in their 
homes with other children. 



Pt. I. 15 

Women 

The women's wards have served about the same number of patients as in other 
years, with 569 new admissions. One hundred sixty-nine (169) were treated for 
venereal disease, a decrease from last year's total, 192; 188 were pregnant, and 14, 
with their babies were convalescing from confinement. The number of births, 160, 
was the same as last year. 

During the year 61 women from state institutions were under care for confinement 
— 35 from the Reformatory for Women, 15 from the Industrial School for Girls, 1 
from the Defective Delinquent Colony, and 10 from the schools for the feeble- 
minded and Monson State Hospital. Twenty-one (21) girls were admitted from 
the Division of Child Guardianship, 13 of whom were pregnant. One hundred 
fourteen (114) other women were admitted for confinement, 100 of whom were 
illegitimately pregnant. The maternity service has been used by the surrounding 
towns for their welfare cases to a great extent for several years. This practice is 
not looked upon with approval, however, inasmuch as there are many good local 
hospitals available for such service. The rate of one dollar per day is too attrac- 
tive, not only to public welfare boards, but for emergency illnesses which prove not 
to be emergencies. 

Seventy-five (75) socially delinquent women were examined by the psychiatrist, 
of whom 42 were found to be feeble-minded and were placed on the waiting list for 
admission to the schools for the feeble-minded. They will remain at the State In- 
firmary until committed, often a very long time because the schools for the feeble- 
minded are reluctant to take older girls and women whom they consider too old to 
be re-educated to good habits of work and living. They are a dangerous menace to 
any home or community in which they might live, and custodial care is the only 
protection for them and society. It is to be regretted that the overcrowded wards 
of the State Infirmary have to assume the duties of the State Department of Mental 
Diseases in the care of these 42 feeble-minded women, as well as 52 feeble-minded 
children. 

Tuberculosis has taken its toll. Fifty-one (51) young women were admitted, of 
whom 25 died. Sixteen (16) women were discharged as arrested and quiescent, 
more than in any year for many years. These patients were referred to the local 
board of health nurse and to clinics for medical follow-up when they returned to 
their homes. Two (2) began work in the Sheltered Workshop, sponsored by the 
Boston Tuberculosis Association, where the wages, insufficient for complete sup- 
port, are supplemented by the Boston Overseers of the Public Welfare or by private 
agencies. 

The largest group of women admitted were those over forty years of age, suffering 
from chronic diseases, who need long-time or terminal care. One hundred five (105) 
were between forty and sixty years of age, 55 were between sixty and sixty-five 
years of age, and 77 were over sixty-five years. Nearly all were too ill or feeble to 
be considered for Old Age Assistance. Cardiac conditions and cerebral hemorrhages 
were the most prevalent diagnoses. Eighty-one (81) of this group died, 61 were 
returned to relatives, 34 were returned to local boards of public welfare, 18 were 
committed to the insane hospitals, 15 were sent to other states, 24 of the more able- 
bodied were placed at work, and only 1 old lady was eligible and physically fit for 
Old Age Assistance in the community. 

Placement and Supervision 

. The case load of every worker not only includes those patients whom she serves 
within the hospital, but is greatly increased by the many persons whom she must 
continue to supervise after they return to the community. This is an accumulation 
and continuing service, sometimes extending over a period of many years, according 
to the need of the individual. To watch the growth of an unhappy, maladjusted 
person into a well-balanced, calm, dependable individual is one of the thrilling, in- 
spiring experiences of social case work. 

The types of persons receiving service vary considerably : the unstable, emotional, 
unmarried mother; the socially delinquent girl; the problem child; the chronic 
arthritic; the lonely old lady; the sick baby; the young man out of work; the man 
with arrested tuberculosis; the family with the sick father or mother; the alcoholic, 



16 



P.D. 17. 



and the psycho-neurotic, all of whom have their appeal and claim on the skill, in- 
telligence and sympathy of the workers. Four hundred seven (407) were advised 
and assisted in the community. In addition, private agencies and boards of public 
welfare referred 81 applicants who had never been patients at the State Infirmary 
to this office for care and treatment. Private agencies assumed the responsibility 
of 8 cases; 21 were returned to their own homes; 19 were unmarried mothers, for 
whom maternity care was secured, and 33 were accepted for placement and super- 
vision. 

Transients and Homeless 

Since the closing of the Federal Transient Centers, the social agencies in Boston 
concerned with the transient and the homeless have co-operated with us by sharing 
the responsibility of investigation and temporary care until trnsportation to the 
home states or other care can be provided. This sub-division received applications, 
direct or referred from other agencies, relative to 236 adults with 84 children, as 
compared with 115 adults with 43 children in 1935. It is interesting to note, in 
the following tables, that the number of men far exceeds the number of women 
aided, 109 men as compared with 35 women; that there was a large number of 
families, 40 with 49 children, and that there were 69 young men under the age of 
twenty-five years. Of the 139 persons returned to other states, to other countries 
or to their towns of legal settlement in Massachusetts, 66 were returned to their 
legal residences, 68 to relatives and 5 to work. Eighteen (18) of the total number 
were referred to other agencies, 50 refused to accept transportation — that is, they 
made other plans or did not return to the office when notified — and in 29 cases the 
alleged place of settlement refused to accept them. 

The largest number of applicants were referred by the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare of Boston, 86, and the next largest by the Travelers' Aid Society, 67. The 
latter makes its own investigation and provides railroad or bus fare; but the Boston 
Overseers merely refer the applicants for investigation, which often involves tem- 
porary care and extensive correspondence. This service is given by the staff of 
social workers who carry the social service at the State Infirmary, and their sincere 
efforts to assist these transients result in many persons being returned to their 
homes and relatives who might otherwise have to be admitted to the State Infir- 
mary. 

Acknowledgements 

The Subdivision of Social Service is greatly indebted to the many hospitals, 
private social agencies and the boards of public welfare for their generous help and 
co-operation in common problems. 

We have been pleased to have students from the Simmons College School of 
Social Work, Boston College School of Social Work, and Regis College give us their 
assistance, not only at the State Infirmary but also weekly field service at the office. 



Statistics 



Applications for Transportation 



Total Number of Applications: 
Single men .... 
Single women 
Couples .... 
Families .... 
One parent with child 



109 
35 
34 

40 and 49 children 
18 and 35 children 

236 and 84 children 



Ages of Applicants: 
Under 15 years* 
15-20 years . 
21-25 years . 
26-30 years . 
31-35 vears . 
36-40 years . 
41-50 years . 
Over 50 years 



Total 



84 
37 
32 
39 
24 
32 
37 
35 

236 



'Accompanied by parents. 



Social Agencies Referring for Transportation: 

Boston Overseers of Public Welfare . . 86 

Travelers Aid Society 67 

Applicants direct 24 

Other state departments 29 



Family Welfare Society . 
Boards of Public Welfare 
Probation Offices 
Private agencies 



Total 236 



Pt. I. 



17 



Disposition of Applications: 

Returned to legal residence .... 66 

Returned to relatives 68 

Returned to work 5 

Referred to other agencies .... 18 
Did not accept transportation ... 50 
Acceptance refused by alleged place of settle- 
ment 29 

Total 236 



Returned to other states . . .121 

Returned to settlement in Massachusetts 10 

Returned to other countries ... 8 

Referred to other agencies ... 18 

Did not accept transportation . . 50 
Acceptance refused by alleged place of 

settlement 29 

Total 236 



Women and Children admitted to the State Infirmary during the Year ending 

November 30, 1936 

Ages at Admission: 

Under 1 year 35 17 to 21 years 

1 to 7 years 20 Over 21 years 

8 to 16 years 29 

Total 



116 

475 



675 



Sources of Admission 
Under 1: 

Boards of Public Welfare . 
Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston . . . . . 
Division of Child Guardianship 



lto7: 

Boards of Public Welfare .... 
Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston 

Division of Child Guardianship . 



8 to 16: 

Boards of Public Welfare .... 
Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston 

Division of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls .... 
Industrial School for Boys .... 



17 

14 
4 

35 

8 

5 
7 

20 

17 

5 
3 
3 
1 

29 

17 to 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare ... 47 

Boards of Health 1 

Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston ....... 39 

Industrial Schools for Girls ... 12 

State Farm 1 

Reformatory for Women .... 7 

Division of Child Guardianship . . 7 

Other institutions 2 

116 

Over 21: 

Boards of Public Welfare .... 279 

Boards of Health 6 

Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston 155 

State Schools for Feeble-minded . . 3 

Reformatory for Women .... 28 

Other institutions 4 

475 



Diseases at Admission 
Under 1: 

Infancy 20 

Miscellaneous diseases .... 13 

Feeble-mindedness 2 

35 
1 to 7: 

Feeble-mindedness 4 

Syphilis 2 

Miscellaneous diseases .... 12 

No disease 2 

20 
8 to 16: 

Feeble-mindedness 8 

Gonorrhea 6 

Pregnancy 6 

Miscellaneous diseases .... 7 

No disease 2 

29 
17 to 21: 

Tuberculosis 9 

Gonorrhea 20 

Syphilis 3 

Feeble-mindedness 1 

Pregnancy 47 

Miscellaneous diseases . . . . 35 

No disease 1 

116 
Over 21: 

Tuberculosis 42 

Gonorrhea 11 

Syphilis 4 

Pregnancy . 104 

Miscellaneous diseases .... 258 

Cancer 5 

Arteriosclerosis 44 

Feeble-mindedness 1 

Epilepsy 3 

No disease 3 



475 



Women and Children discharged from the State Infirmary during the Year ending 

November 30, 1936 



Discharged to: 




Discharged to: 




Relatives and friends 


206 


Court 


17 


Employment 


52 


To other States 


11 


Employment with child (18 women with 




Reformatory for Women (43 women, 18 


18 children) 


36 


children) 


61 


Private agencies 


13 


State Schools for Feeble-minded 


11 


Place of settlement 


91 


Other institutions .... 


44 


Deported by U. S. Immigration Service . 


2 


Absconded 


26 


Division of Child Guardianship 


60 







Girls' Parole Department (20 women and 




Total 


657 


7 children) 


27 







18 



P.D. 17 



Men admitted, to the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 30, 1936 



15 to 40 
41 to 60 
Over 60 



Ages at Admission 



538 

1,313 

956 



(Readmissions, 1,548) 

Sources of Admissions 
15 to 40: 

Boards of Public Welfare .... 

Boards of Health 

Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston 

Transient Bureau and Federal Camps 
State Farm 



41 to 60: 

Boards of Public Welfare .... 

Boards of Health 

Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston 

State Farm 



Over 60: 

Boards of Public Welfare .... 
Institutions Registration Department, 

Boston 

State Farm 

Transient Bureaus and Federal Camps . 
Other Institutions 



2,807 



191 
9 

332 

4 
2 

538 

544 

7 

759 
3 

1,313 

527 

419 
6 
1 
3 

956 



Diseases at Admission 



15 to 40: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis . . . , 

Alcoholism 

Heart ... 

Miscellaneous diseases 

Epilepsy 

No disease 



41 to 60: 

Tuberculosis . 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis . 

Alcoholism 

Arteriosclerosis 

Cancer . . 

Heart ... 

Epilepsy 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 

Blind . 

Mental observation 



Over 60: 

Tuberculosis . 

Alcoholism 

Arteriosclerosis 

Syphilis . . . . 

Cancer . 

Heart . . . 

Miscellaneous diseases 

No disease 

Blind . . . . 



85 
39 
16 
74 
12 
260 
6 
46 

538 



83 

2 

5 

183 

71 

3 

26 

2 

774 

158 

5 

1 



1,313 



956 



Men discharged from the State Infirmary during the Year ending November 30, 1936 



To relatives 










72 


To place of settlement 










124 


To Court . 










5 


To employment 










30 


To other states 










16 


To other countries . 










2 


To Board of Health 










2 



To other institutions .... 
Without investigation but interviewed 

Absconded 

To Transient Bureau and Federal Camps 



79 

1,024 

689 

15 

2,058 



Social Service for Men 

Interviewed at the State Infirmary 

Discharged without investigation 1,024 

Listed as social service cases 1,016 

(Short service, 750; intensive service, 266.) 
Tuberculous patients: 

Admitted to State Infirmary 

Social Service cases 

Discharged 

Follow-up cases 

Discharged to places of legal settlement ' . 

Discharged to other states 

Discharged to other countries 

Employment found for men at the State Infirmary 

Employment found for men after discharge from State Infirmary 

Rehabilitated on Temporary Aid 

Rehabilitated on Old Age Assistance 

Social service cases assisted in community 



2,040 



193 
85 
63 
25 

124 

16 

2 

70 

35 

100 
16 
38 



Summary of Court Work 

Warrants on illegitimacy complaints 20 

Cases appealed to Superior Court 6 

Adjudications of paternity and court orders for support 14 

Agreements for support of illegitimate children (out of court) 8 

Adoptions of children ■ 4 

Lump sum settlements for support of illegitimate children 4 

Money collected for support of illegitimate children $5,035.51 

Money paid out for support of illegitimate children 4,361.75 

Number of bank accounts for illegitimate children 67 

Balance on hand for illegitimate children, November 30, 1936 $13,783.94 



Pt, I. 19 

Summary of Placement Work 

Persons under active supervision, November 30, 1936 391 

37 mothers with 37 children at work 74 

27 mothers boarding children in foster homes 27 

Other women and girls under supervision . . . 254 

Women in institutions 16 

Other children under supervision 20 

391 

Children referred for placement to Division of Child Guardianship 27 

Children referred to private agencies 5 

Girls over 21, accepted for supervision 9 

From Division of Child Guardianship 7 

From Girls' Parole Department 2 



Adoptions (by relatives, 4; by strangers, 2) 6 

Marriages of unmarried mothers while under supervision 14 

Replacements in employment 154 

Recidivists under supervision 6 

Visits of investigation 276 

Visits to clients at home and at work 590 

Visits to clients elsewhere and at office 541 

Visits of clients to hospitals 118 

Wage homes investigated 60 

57 savings accounts for clients at work, amounting to $7,658.71 

Applications at office 81 

For maternity service 19 

For social treatment , 54 

Referred to private social agencies 8 

81 

General Summary 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary 675 

Births at the State Infirmary (146 illegitimate; 14 legitimate) 160 

Men admitted to the State Infirmary 2,807 

Women and children discharged by Subdivision of Social Service 657 

Men discharged by Subdivision of Social Service 2,058 

Women and children discharged directly to other divisions 148 

Deaths at the State Infirmary (hospital wards) 563 

Applications for assistance at office 317 

Persons under supervision in the community, November 30, 1936 (391 women and children; 38 

men) 429 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance 

Francis Bard well, Superintendent 

On December 1, 1935, there were 25,303 active cases enrolled under Old Age 
Assistance, and at the close of the fiscal year (November 30, 1936) 45,276 were re- 
ceiving this form of assistance. Of this number 15,919 cases were enrolled between 
September 1 and November 13, or during the period when the age reduction to 
sixty-five years was in force. 

The new law (Chapter 436, Acts of 1936) which went into effect on September 1, 
and which was the outcome of an intensive study of the subject by a legislative 
recess committee, created many changes. The most drastic change was the re- 
duction of the age of eligibility to sixty-five, heretofore at seventy. The legal re- 
quirement, meeting the provisions of the Federal Law, that all payments to recipi- 
ents must be by check or in cash and be delivered to the applicant at his residence, 
if he so requested, was incorporated in the law. Also it was provided that support 
could be given to a recipient in a boarding home, " which for the purposes hereof 
shall include any institution providing shelter, care and treatment for aged persons 
which is not supported in whole or in part by public funds; provided, that no inmate 
of such a boarding home or institution shall be eligible for assistance under this 
chapter while being cared for under contract." 

A definite minimum rate with certain deductions as provided in the law was 
established as follows: 

Section 1 

and shall, except as hereinafter provided, be at a rate of not less than thirty 
dollars monthly for each recipient, or, in case of a husband and wife living 
together, both of whom are eligible for such assistance, not less than fifty 



20 P. D. 17 

dollars monthly for both, or in case of sisters or brothers or sisters and brothers 
living together, all of whom are so eligible, not less than forty-five dollars 
monthly for two, and not less than fifteen dollars monthly for each additional 
brother or sister so eligible. In computing the above minima the local board 
of public welfare, or the appeal board hereinafter provided for, as the case 
may be, shall deduct therefrom the amount of income the person assisted or 
to be assisted may be receiving from any source whatsoever, and may deduct 
therefrom such reasonable amount as may be deemed to represent the financial 
value of board, lodging or other assistance hich is wbeing furnished to such 
person from any source whatever, or should be furnished to him by his children. 
No person receiving assistance hereunder shall be deemed to be a pauper by 
reason thereof. 

In Section 2, the law provides for the establishment of a bureau of old age assis- 
tance by each board of public welfare: 

Section 2. Each board of public welfare shall, for the purpose of granting 
adequate assistance and service to such aged persons, establish a division 
thereof to be designated as the bureau of old age assistance. In determining 
the need for financial assistance, said bureaus shall give consideration to the 
resources of the aged person. Separate records of all such aged persons who are 
resources of the aged person. Separate records of all such aged persons who 
are assisted shall be kept and reports returned in the manner prescribed by 
section thirty-four of chapter forty-one and by sections thirty-two and thirty- 
three of chapter one hundred and seventeen. The department shall make an 
annual report to the general court, and also such reports to the social security 
board established under the federal social security act, approved August four- 
teenth, nineteen hundred and thirty-five, as may be necessary to secure to the 
commonwealth the benefits of said act. 

Section 3 of the law is devoted to the matter of appeals and the personnel of the 
Board of Appeal. 

As there has been a material change in the new law in matters of real estate 
holdings by applicants and also insurance, those esctions 4, 5 and 6 dealing with 
these factors are as follows: 

Section 4. The ownership of an equity in real estate upon which an applicant 
actually resides shall not disqualify him from receiving assistance under this 
chapter; provided, that if such equity, computed on the basis of assessed val- 
uation, exceeds two thousand dollars in each of the five years immediately pre- 
ceding his application, the board of public welfare of the town rendering such 
assistance, or the bureau of old age assistance established by such board, shall, 
through the appropriate town official, require such applicant to execute a bond 
in a penal sum at least equal to the amount of the equity in excess of two 
thousand dollars, running to the treasurer of the town, conditioned on repay- 
ment to such town of all amounts of such assistance, without interest, such 
bond to be secured by mortgage of the applicant's real estate. Every such 
bond and mortgage shall be forthwith entered for record in the proper registry 
of deeds or registry district of the land court, as the case may be, and the regis- 
ter of deeds or assistant recorder of the land court shall thereupon record or 
register such bond and mortgage without fee. Out of the proceeds realized 
by the town from any such bond and mortgage or from the estate of a person 
granted assistance under this chapter, or both, the federal government, through 
the commonwealth, shall be reimbursed to an amount not exceeding the 
amount contributed by it in such case and the remainder shall be apportioned 
between the commonwealth and the town furnishing the assistance in pro- 
portion to the amounts of their respective contributions. 

Section 5. The ownership of a policy of insurance of the type known as 
group insurance, for which the weekly premium does not exceed fifty cents per 
week, or a policy of insurance in an amount not exceeding one thousand dollars, 
shall not disqualify an applicant from receiving assistance under this chapter; 
provided, that such policy has been in effect not less than five years prior to 
the date of his application. 



Pt. I. 21 

Section 6. No assistance under this chapter shall be granted to an applicant 
who, at any time within five years immediately prior to the filing of an appli- 
cation for such assistance, has made an assignment or transfer of property so as 
to render himself eligible to such assistance. Assistance hereunder shall not be 
subject to trustee .process, and no assignment thereof shall be valid. No appli- 
cant for assistance hereunder, who knowingly makes any false statement, or 
seeks to perpetrate any fraud or deception, in or relative to his application for 
such assistance, shall be granted any assistance hereunder upon such appli- 
cation, nor shall he be eligible for one year thereafter to make further appli- 
cation for such assistance or to receive the same. 

Section 7 provides: "Money received by the commonwealth from the federal 
government as a grant for old age assistance shall be paid to the several towns as 
allotted by the department and shall be kept as a separate account by every such 
town and used only for the purposes specified by the department, notwithstanding 
the provisions of section fifty-three of chapter forty-four." 

Under Section 8 provisions are made for reimbursements and directions as to 
payments between towns and as to bills to be rendered to the commonwealth and 
penalty for failure to comply. 

Prior to the passage of this law, a person entitled to receive aid, if in distress, 
through State aid and soldiers' relief was obliged to seek assistance at that source. 
The law in Section 9 allows such an individual a choice of either form of relief, 
soldiers' relief or old age assistance. This is adaptable particularly to parents of 
soldiers or sailors who served in the World War and who participated in the son's 
allotment. Now such parents are given the choice and it is usual to apply for Old 
Age Assistance in such cases. 

On the whole, this new law is more liberal than the original law and as is natural, 
numbers have increased materially. The Federal Law is so framed as to allow 
much latitude in state laws and it is evident each state knowing its own needs 
best, knowing the will of its inhabitants, creates a law to care for those types of 
aged dependent which in the estimation of the law makers it is the intention of the 
people should be provided for. 

With the age reduction in effect September 1, the applications show a marked 
increase with a portent toward 100% gain at least. This influx, taxing the per- 
sonnel in the local bureaus to the extreme, has been met in most towns and cities 
efficiently. There have been the expected waits in enrollment due in most cases 
to the applicants' inability to prove eligibility. While the burden of proof is on the 
applicant, local investigators render every assistance, but a little more co-operation 
on the part of relatives and friends would be welcomed by the authorities, and a 
help to the applicant. 

The new rule relative to medical social service recommends that the applicant's 
health be under the care of a physician of the applicant's choice. In most cases 
this has proved a benefit to the applicant. But, unfortunately, there are instances 
when visits by the doctor and charges have been considered excessive. As condi- 
tions of this kind are wisely covered in the rule, which allows the local bureau to 
approve or disapprove in such cases, medical service can be held within reasonable 
limits. 

But, with federal participation in so many forms of relief, it is well to bear in 
mind that Old Age Assistance is only one type of aid in a broad program and 
that a well-balanced plan covering all welfare activities is desirable. 

Statistics 

On December 1, 1935, there were 25,303 active cases receiving Old Age Assistance. 
During the year 25,877 new cases were aided and 5,904 cases closed, so that there 
were 45,276 cases receiving Old Age Assistance at the close of the fiscal year, 
November 30, 1936. 

The new cases were classified as follows : 



22 



P.D. 17 





New Cases 


Reopened Cases 








Settled 


Unsettled 


Settled 


Unsettled 


Total 




Male 
Female 


9,440 
11,598 


1,123 
1,253 


1,021 
1,126 


136 

180 


11,720 
14,157 




Total 


21,038 


2,376 


2,147 


316 


25,877 




Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Separated 

Deserted 


2,878 

8,228 

8,857 

395 

519 

161 


330 

778 

1,064 

81 

92 

31 


184 

701 

1,169 

27 

53 

13 

2,147 


22 

61 

202 

8 
20 

3 


3,414 

9,768 

11,292 

511 

684 

208 




Total 


21,038 


2,376 


316 


25,877 





2,463 



Reasons for Opening: 

Moved from other towns . . . . . . ' . . . . 964 

Proven eligible ............ 

Resources depleted . . . . . . . . . . 607 

Returned from visits to other places ........ 324 

Left hospitals or other institutions ..... . . 106 

Children or relatives no longer able to provide . . ... 200 

Other forms of aid discontinued. ........ 15 

Living conditions corrected ......... 3 

Reasons for Closing: 

Deceased . . 2,826 

Moved to other towns .......... 1,170 

Sufficient resources ........... 802 

Children or relatives to provide ........ 224 

Admitted to hospitals or institutions ........ 446 

Not deserving ............ 51 

Required residence not proved ......... 33 

Not citizens ..... ...... 32 

Required age not proven .......... .49 

Left state 199 

Excess property ........... 33 

Transferred to other forms of relief ........ 10 

Notices from wrong city or town ........ 8 

Not living on own property ......... 15 

Living conditions not satisfactory ........ 6 

5,904 

The active Old Age Assistance cases as of November 30, 1936, are as follows: 



Abington . 


155 


Boxford . 


7 


Deerfield 




31 


Grafton . 


88 


Acton 


45 


Bovlston . 


14 


Dennis 




78 


Granby 


10 


Acushnet . 


43 


Braintree 


. 223 


Dighton 




32 


Granville . 


5 


Adams 


112 


Brewster . 


23 


Douglas 




22 


Gt. Barrington 


99 


Agawam . 


70 


Bridgewater 


71 


Dover 




9 


Greenfield 


. 225 


Alford 


5 


Brimfield . 


17 


Dracut 




66 


Greenwich 


1 


Amesbury 


243 


Brockton 


938 


Dudley 




17 


Groton 


28 


Amherst . 


83 


Brookfield 


29 


Dunstable 


3 


Groveland 


53 


Andover . 


125 


Brookline 


245 


Duxbury . 


51 


Hadley 


19 


Arlington 


189 


Buckland 


34 


E. Bridgewater 


68 


Halifax 


21 


Ashburnham 


20 


Burlington 


32 


E. Brookfield 


19 


Hamilton 


20 


Ashby 


15 


Cambridge 


694 


E. Longmeadow 


30 


Hampden . 


17 


Ashfield . 


13 


Canton 


65 


Eastham . 


13 


Hancock . 


10 


Ashland . 


23 


Carlisle 


11 


Easthampton 


97 


Hanover . 


60 


Athol 


133 


Carver 


19 


Easton 


79 


Hanson . 


73 


Attleboro 


284 


Charlemont 


14 


Edgartown 


39 


Hardwick . 


22 


Auburn . 


60 


Charlton . 


38 


Egremont . 


15 


Harvard . 


11 


Avon 


48 


Chatham . 


59 


Enfield . 


8 


Harwich . 


40 


Ayer 


39 


Chelmsford 


104 


Erving 


24 


Hatfield . 


16 


Barnstable 


137 


Chelsea . 


367 


Essex 


35 


Haverhill 


790 


Barre 


28 


Cheshire . 


33 


Everett . 


382 


Hawley . 


5 


Becket 


16 


Chester 


13 


Fairhaven 


131 


Heath 


8 


Bedford . 


15 


Chesterfield 


20 


Fall River 


1,414 


Hingham . 


68 


Belchertown 


43 


Chicopee 


249 


Falmouth 


65 


Hinsdale . 


29 


Bellingham 


40 


Chilmark . 


5 


FlTCHBURG 


245 


Holbrook . 


115 


Belmont . 


62 


Clarksburg 


28 


Florida 


00 


Hoi den 


27 


Berkley . 


28 


Clinton 


159 


Foxborough 


85 


Holland . 


6 


Berlin 


12 


Cohasset . 


38 


Framingham 


283 


Holliston . 


67 


Bernardston 


17 


Colrain 


19 


Franklin . 


91 


Holyoke 


279 


Beverly . 


161 


Concord . 


41 


Freetown . 


53 


Hopedale . 


21 


Billerica . 


101 


Conway . 


14 


Gardner 


195 


Hopkinton 


76 


Blackstone 


48 


Cummington 


16 


Gay Head 


3 


Hubbardston 


26 


Blandford 


9 


Dalton 


57 


Georgetown 


59 


Hudson 


105 


Bolton 


17 


Dana 


2 


Gill 


9 


Hull 


27 


Boston . 


7,021 


Danvers . 


164 


Gloucester 


280 


Huntington 


14 


Bourne 


85 


Dartmouth 


109 


Goshen 


4 


Ipswich . 


74 


Boxborough 


4 


Dedham . 


120 


Gosnold . 




00 


Kingston . 


58 



Pt. I. 



23 



Lakeville . 


41 


Natick 


196 


Richmond 


10 


Tyngsborough . 


26 


Lancaster . 


36 


Needham . 


80 


Rochester. 


23 


Tyringham 


6 


Lanesborough 


10 


New Ashford 


1 


Rockland . 


201 


Upton 


56 


Lawrence 


640 


New Bedford . 


2,010 


Rockport . 


81 


Uxbridge . 


60 


Lee . 


73 


New Braintree . 


7 


Rowe 


12 


Wakefield. 


177 


Leicester . 


41 


New Marlborough 


22 


Rowley 


30 


Wales 


20 


Lenox 


22 


New Salem 


11 


Royalston 


20 


Walpole . 


49 


Leominster 


317 


Newbury . 


45 


Russell 


8 


Waltham 


450 


Leverett . 


25 


Newbtjryport . 


155 


Rutland . 


10 


Ware 


70 


Lexington 


48 


Newton . 


325 


Salem 


607 


Wareham . 


137 


Ley den 


8 


Norfolk . 


16 


Salisbury . 


51 


Warren 


60 


Lincoln 


12 


North Adams . 


329 


Sandisfield 


14 


Warwick . 


7 


Littleton . 


9 


No. Andover 


83 


Sandwich . 


35 


Washington 


4 


Longmeadow 


22 


No. Attleborough 


135 


Saugus 


171 


Watertown 


136 


Lowell . 


1,077 


No. Brookfield . 


39 


Savoy 


9 


Wayland . 


34 


Ludlow . 


41 


No. Reading 


37 


Scituate . 


64 


Webster . 


94 


Lunenburg 


46 


Northampton . 


244 


Seekonk . 


37 


Wellesley . 


47 


Lynn 


1,780 


Northborough . 


56 


Sharon 


37 


Wellfieet . 


23 


Lynnfield 


34 


Northbridge 


58 


Sheffield . 


37 


Wendell . 


16 


Malden . 


512 


Northfield 


38 


Shelburne . 


24 


Wenham . 


15 


Manchester 


34 


Norton 


50 


Sherborn . 


13 


W. Boylston 


34 


Mansfield . 


70 


Norwell . 


53 


Shirley 


20 


W. Bridge water 


49 


Marblehead 


224 


Norwood . 


47 


Shrewsbury 


48 


W. Brookfield 


40 


Marion 


30 


Oak Bluffs 


36 


Shutesbury 


7 


W. Newbury 


31 


Marlborough 


237 


Oakham . 


5 


Somerset . 


74 


W. Springfield 


141 


Marshfield 


53 


Orange 


107 


SOMERVILLE 


963 


W. Stockbridge 


18 


Mashpee . 


19 


Orleans 


30 


So . Hadley 


64 


W. Tisbury 


3 


Mattapoisett 


34 


Otis . 


20 


Southampton 


13 


Westborough 


93 


Maynard . 


63 


Oxford 


69 


Southborough 


22 


Westfield 


144 


Medfield . 


38 


Palmer 


49 


Southbridge 


113 


Westford . 


44 


Medford 


579 


Paxton 


2 


Southwick. 


16 


Westhampton 


12 


Medway . 


65 


Peabody . 


195 


Spencer . 


94 


Westminister 


19 


Melrose . 


228 


Pelham 


13 


Springfield 


1,125 


Weston 


9 


Mendon . 


18 


Pembroke 


40 


Sterling 


24 


Westport . 


78 


Merrimac . 


76 


Pepperell . 


46 


Stockbridge 


17 


Westwood 


15 


Methuen . 


263 


Peru 


3 


Stoneham. 


119 


Weymouth 


425 


Middleborough 


255 


Petersham 


14 


Stoughton 


128 


Whately . 


10 


Middlefield 


2 


Phillipston 


5 


Stow 


21 


Whitman . 


175 


Middleton. 


42 


PlTTSFIELD 


525 


Sturbridge 


21 


Wilbraham 


26 


Milford . 


196 


Plainfield . 


11 


Sudbury . 


23 


Williamsburg 


36 


Millbury . 


79 


Plainville . 


28 


Sunderland 


12 


Williamstown 


66 


Millis 


32 


Plymouth . 


247 


Sutton 


38 


Wilmington 


55 


Millville . 


39 


Plympton . 


16 


Swampscott 


111 


Winchendon 


105 


Milton 


78 


Prescott . 





Swansea . 


62 


Winchester 


51 


Monroe . 


4 


Princeton . 


2 


Taunton 


345 


Windsor . 


6 


Monson . 


64 


Provincetown . 


64 


Templeton 


94 


Winthrop . 


130 


Montague 


99 


Qttincy . 


682 


Tewksbury 


20 


Woburn . 


235 


Monterey . 


9 


Randolph . 


137 


Tisbury . 


33 


Worcester 


1,461 


Montgomery 


2 


Raynham . 


44 


Tolland . 





Worthington 


19 


Mt. Washingtor 


i 


Reading . 


128 


Topsfield . 


20 


Wrentham 


30 


Nahant 


31 


Rehoboth . 


26 


Townsend 


58 


Yarmouth 


44 


Nantucket 


65 


Revere . 


290 


Truro 


6 


Total . 





Old Age Assistance Appeal Board 

Under General Laws Chapter 118A, as amended by Chapter 436 of the Acts of 
1936, section 3 provides for a Board of Appeal and defines its duties as follows: 

Section 3. Any person aggrieved by the failure of a town to render adequate 
assistance under this chapter, or by the failure of the board of public welfare 
of a town to approve or reject an application for assistance hereunder within 
thirty days after receiving such application, shall have a right of appeal to a 
board composed of the superintendent of old age assistance in the department, 
the director of the division of aid and relief, a member of the advisory board 
of the department designated by the commissioner of public welfare and the 
commissioner of public welfare, ex officio, which board, hereinafter called the 
appeal board, shall forthwith make a thorough investigation and shall have 
authority to act upon any appeal in relation to the following matters: 

1. The matter of denial of assistance by the local board of public welfare; 

2. The matter of a change in the amount of assistance given; 

3. The matter of withdrawal of assistance. 

In all cases of appeal an opportunity for a fair hearing shall be provided by 
the appeal board. All decisions of the appeal board shall be binding upon the 
local board of public welfare involved and shall be complied with by such local 
board. 



24 



P.D. 17. 



Appeals Received, 392 



Approved 

At hoi 

Barnstable 

Billerioa 

Boston 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Dan vers 

Fall River 

Haverhill 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Marion 

Medford 

Melrose 

Quincy 

Saugus 

Somerville 

Sutton 

Waltham 

Wellfleet . 

West Bridgewater 

Weymouth 

Whitman 



Denied 

Acushnet 

Arlington 

Auburn 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Cohasset 

Concord 

Douglas 

Everett 

Fall River 

Fitchburg 

Gloucester 

Haverhill 

Leominster 

Lowell 



41 


Lynn 


2 


Assistance granted before 


Groveland . 


2 




Maiden 


4 


action taken bi 


/ the 


Great Barrington 


2 


1 


Maynard . 


2 


Board of Appe 


il 39 


Hatfield . 


1 


1 


Milton 


1 


Boston 
Brookline . 
Chesterfield 




Haverhill . 


2 


1 
7 
1 
2 


New Bedford 

Norwell 

Oxford 


1 

1 
3 


7 
2 
2 


Holyoke 
Hopkinton 
Hull . 


4 
1 
1 


Pittsfield . 


1 


Danvers 


1 


Lawrence . 


1 


1 


Reading 


1 


Dedham 


1 


Leominster 


3 


3 
4 


Revere 


2 


Fall River . 


2 


Lowell 


3 


Scituate 


1 


Harwich 


1 


Lynn 


37 


1 


Somerville . 


2 


Lawrence . 


1 


Maiden 


8 


4 


Springfield 


2 


Lynn 


2 


Marshfield 


1 


1 

1 
I 


Wakefield . 

Waltham . 


2 
2 


Mansfield . 
Medford . 


1 
1 


Mattapoisett 
Medfield . 


1 
1 


Watertown 


1 


Monterey . 


1 


Medford . 


2 


1 

1 


Westwood . 


1 


Natick 


1 


Melrose 


1 


West Springfield . 


2 


North Adams 


1 


Middleton . 


1 


1 


Weymouth 


1 


Pepperell . 


1 


Milford 


2 


1 


Wilmington 


1 


Salisbury . 


1 


Natick 


2 


1 
3 

1 
1 


Worcester . 


1 


Somerville . 


6 


Needham . 


2 






Springfield 


2 


Newton . 


2 


Died . 


1 


Wayland . 
Wellfleet . 


1 
1 


New Bedford 
North Adams 


3 

2 


1 
1 


Boston 


1 


Westfield . 
Winchendon 
Woburn 


1 
1 
1 


Northampton 

Northbridge 

Orange 


3 
1 

1 


86 


Moved 


1 


Pending 


. 214 


Palmer 
Pittsfield . 


2 
2 




Haverhill . 


1 


Arlington . 


4 


Plainville . 


2 


1 






Athol 


4 


Reading 


3 


2 






Attleboro . 


1 


Revere 


2 


2 


Withdrawn 


5 


Barnstable 


2 


Salem 


1 


1 






Belmont 


1 


Saugus 


7 


2 


Cambridge 


1 


Boston 


26 


Shutesbury 


1 


23 


Haverhill . 


1 


Brockton . 


1 


Somerville . 


10 


1 


Newton 


1 


Brookline . 


2 


Springfield 


2 


3 


Oxford 


1 


Cambridge 


4 


Stockbridge 


1 


1 


Wendell . 


1 


Chelsea 


2 


Swampscott 


1 


1 






Chicopee . 


1 


Taunton 


2 


1 






Cohasset . 


1 


Wakefield . 


3 


1 


No formal application 




Danvers 


1 


Waltham . 


3 


2 


fihd with local 




Dartmouth 


1 


Wayland . 


1 


4 


bureau . . . 


5 


Deer field . 


2 


Westford . 


1 


2 






Dennis 


1 


Westport . 


2 


1 


Boston 


2 


Duxbury . 


1 


West Springfield 


2 


1 


Everett 


1 


East Brookfield 


1 


Wilmington 


1 


2 


Fall River . 


1 


Fall River . 


10 


Winthrop . 


2 


1 


Taunton 


1 


Greenfield . ' 


1 


Woburn 


6 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP 

Miss Winifred A. Keneran, Director 
Children in Care and Custody of the Division 

On December 1, 1935 there were 7,703 children in custody of this Division, clas- 
sified as: delinquent, 268; wayward, 7; neglected, 3,883, and dependent, 3,545. 
During the following twelve-months' period there were admitted to care 1,256, 
viz: — delinquent, 152; wayward, 3; neglected, 707, and dependent, 394. The total 
number under care was, therefore, 8,959, an increase of 274 or 3.1% as compared 
with the population of the previous year. 

Those who were discharged are classified as delinquent, 166; wayward, 2; ne- 
glected, 559, and dependent, 416. They were discharged under the following con- 
ditions: 221 became twenty-one years of age and automatically passed from our 
care; 23 died; 38 were adopted; 15 were placed with Boards of Public Welfare in 
towns of settlement; 84 were placed in schools for the feeble-minded, 68 were sent 
to correctional institutions, and 694 were returned to homes of parents or relatives, 
or were otherwise discharged. 

It follows, therefore, that 7,816 children remained in custody on November 30, 
1936, viz: delinquent, 254; wayward, 8; neglected, 4,031, and dependent, 3,523. 

The number of foreign-born children varies slightly from year to year. There 
are now under care only 90, the majority (67) being natives of Canada. All the 
others (23) came from European countries. Three thousand one hundred twenty- 
two (3,122) children have one or both foreign-born parents. 



Pt. I. 



25 



Illegitimate children number 2,268 or slightly more than 29 per cent of our 
entire population. This is an increase of 119 for the past year. 

The number of orphans under care shows little variation; 298 children are full 
orphans and 1,816 others have but one living parent. 

Of the 7,816 ] children in our care, 6,850 are placed in foster homes under the fol- 
lowing conditions: 5,777 are fully supported; 254 are furnished clothing only; 345 
are placed without expense, and 474 (349 girls and 125 boys) are receiving wages. 

In addition, 312 are placed with parents and 122 with other relatives, subject to 
our supervision; 300 are receiving care and treatment in hospitals; 31 boys are in 
the United States Service, and 121 are employed in the Civilian Conservation 
Corps; 27 girls and 5 boys, who are married and are establishing their own homes, 
remain in our custody under supervision. 

Children Under Three Years: 

At the beginning of the year there were 471 children under three years of age. 
During the year 317 were received, making the total number under care 788. In- 
cluded in the number received were three foundlings, one of whom was identified 
as the second child abandoned by its mother. She was found and brought before 
the court on a charge of abandonment under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 
119, section 12. The other foundlings died, one of marasmus at the age of three 
months after sixteen days' care, and the third of status lymphaticus after two 
months' care, aged four months fifteen days. 

Seventy-two (72) infants were discharged from custody and 193, having reached 
the age of three years, were transferred to the group of older children. Eight (8) 
of the 788 under care died; 1 at the State Infirmary, 3 in local hospitals and 4 in 
foster homes. 

The following table shows the rate of mortality among infants under three years, 
also under one year, for the past ten-year period: 





Under One 


Year 


Under Three 


Years 




Total 


Died 


Percentage 


Total 


Died 


Percentage 


1927 


131 


8 


6.1 


531 


6 


2.1 


1928 


86 


9 


10.4 


645 


18 


2.8 


1929 


97 


11 


11.3 


719 


21 


2.9 


1930 . ... 


195 


8 


4.1 


802 


17 


2.1 


1931 


92 


3 


3.3 


802 


8 


0.99 


1932 . ... 


102 


5 


4.9 


852 


12 


1.4 


1933 


70 


6 


8.57 


779 


9 


1.15 


1934 


101 


4 


3.96 


734 


7 


0.95 


1935 


89 


6 


6.74 


758 


7 


0.92 


1936 


102 


5 


4.9 


788 


8 


1.01 



Children from Three to Twelve Years: 

There are 3,256 children under care in this group. There has been an increase 
in the proportion of sub-normal and problem children received during the year. 
As reported in previous years, many of them are psychotic and no other provision 
has been made for their care although placing-out in foster homes is not the best 
method. They cannot be placed with any prospect of permanency and frequent 
removals are necessary. It is hoped that a hospital for these afflicted children may 
be provided soon. 

Temporary-home care is one of the greatest problems of this group. Children, 
on reception, must be provided with immediate care and shelter and we are meeting 
this need by placing in family homes where provision is made for larger numbers 
and for emergencies. We are convinced that this method is now obsolete. The 
type of home required for this very important work is no longer to be found. Quar- 

1 In addition to these 7,816 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1936, 347 boys at the Lyman School for Boys; 234 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 250 boys at 
the Industrial School for Boys; 2,321 boys and 533 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Training Schools, outside the schools; 131 boys and 138 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospital 
School; and 187 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their mothers 
or else under hospital treatment, making a total of 11,957 children in the care and custody or under the 
supervision of the department. There were also 1,924 children supported at the expense of cities and 
towns who were subject to the department's visitation, reported upon at page 64. 



26 P.D. 17. 

antine at different times during the year has caused overcrowding in the temporary 
homes available. 

Because of the large numbers of children who require temporary care, it is obvious 
that the individual attention which is absolutely necessary cannot be given under 
present conditions. 

A receiving station where children may be studied and classified, and given the 
important physical examination and psychiatric tests under observation of thor- 
oughly experienced workers, would supply a long-felt want and would be helpful 
in giving to the visitors more intelligent understanding of the child and his needs 
in the future. 

Older Girls: 

There are 1,697 girls in this group. For several years it was our custom to trans- 
fer girls at the age of twelve from the supervision of a " visitor to children" to that 
of a visitor who specialized in the care of older girls. We have recently experi- 
mented by having several of the visitors to children continue the supervision of 
these girls, believing that there should be no serious problems in the care of an 
adolescent provided the development has been gradual and the friendship and 
confidence of the girl with the visitor have already been established. Eight of our 
workers are now supervising boys and girls in the district between three and twelve 
years, plus a group of girls beyond that age. We believe this experiment will prove 
to be beneficial to the girls and economical to the Department. 

There are 1,176 of the girls in this group attending school — 405 at high school, 
and 329 at junior high school. We are proud to report that 5 girls are pursuing 
higher education in colleges and universities, and 10 are training in hospitals. Of 
the high school girls, 29 are earning wages, 39 are kept free of expense, 135 are part 
free and 205 are fully supported. A continuing effort is being made to place all our 
high school girls over sixteen years in free or part free homes, but the effort thus 
far has not been entirely successful. However, of 872 girls over sixteen years of 
age, only 154 are being fully supported at the expense of the Commonwealth. 
Eighty-four (84) of the 115 girls who reached their majority during the year had 
savings on deposit totaling $6,629.54. 

Older Boys: 

This group suffered a serious loss in the death of Roswell D. Blandy who had 
been a member of the staff for twenty-five years. During that period of time he 
was visitor and guardian to several hundred boys and he performed his duties in 
this capacity, and as a representative of the Department in court, in a most efficient 
manner. His death occurred on January 1st, 1936. 

On the 28th of the same month, the Department was deeply saddened by the 
death of Timothy J. Carey who was connected with the Department for more than 
twenty-five years and was supervisor of tHe older boys' group for nine and one half 
years. His deep interest in the boys and all their problems, his intense loyalty to 
the Department, and his spirit of helpfulness and co-operation gained for him the 
respect and friendship of the entire staff. 

This group, with 1,995 boys between twelve and twenty-one years to care for, 
is faced with a problem in the reluctance of capable foster mothers to take so-called 
"big boys" into their homes. Because of this situation the resources of their dis- 
tricts are thoroughly utilized by the fifteen visitors in this division with good results 
in most cases. 

The broad and varied experience gained by the men visitors through their at- 
tendance at practically every juvenile court session held in the Commonwealth is 
of great value to them in their understanding of the needs of the boys. 

The heavy case-load handled by the men, in addition to the court work, makes 
it imperative that each visitor be aware of all opportunities for educational, social 
or employment advantage for his boys. One visitor is handling 173 cases with 
others ranging down to 120; the average being about 135. Two-thirds of the boys 
are at school, 231 in high schools, 548 in junior high grades and 48 in various types 
of agricultural or vocational schools, including two boys at college. The Wayside 
Inn Boys School at Sudbury continues to provide education for 27 selected boys 
who are interested in agriculture. Three hundred forty-five (345) have been em- 



Pt. I. 



27 



ployed in twenty-seven different types of employment, ranging from restaurant 
work to an assistant motion picture operator. The Civilian Conservation Corps 
has been our best source of employment with 121 boys enrolled on November 30. 
Improved business conditions are reflected in the larger number of boys employed 
this year, 345 as against 254 a year ago. 

Mentally Deficient Children: 

Foster home placement of children in this classification, by the two social workers 
so engaged, involves the education of foster parents in the interpretation of feeble- 
mindedness in its varying degrees. The happiness of the child is absolutely de- 
pendent upon a complete understanding of his mental handicap. 

Each child constitutes a problem, — not alone from the point of view of limited 
mentality, but because of the physical abnormalities which frequently accompany 
this condition, and the additional factor of delinquency. 

There are two classes of children in the group, — the child who is obviously in 
need of institutional care in a school for feeble-minded, but who must be adjusted 
in a foster home until his name is reached on the long waiting list which exists in all 
of the state schools, and the child whose mental level is higher than the above- 
mentioned, and who, by individual study and personal guidance of foster parents 
and teachers, may become a useful, happy individual in the community, even 
though continued supervision may be necessary. 

433 



Active cases November 30, 1935, to December 1, 1936 . 




Placed in foster homes: 




Boarding ........ 


262 


Free of expense ....... 


13 


Board free — clothing supplied ..... 


11 


Placed in hospitals ....... 


94 


Placed in other institutions ..... 


5 


Wage earners ........ 


48 



The ages of wage earners range from sixteen to twenty-one years. Employed as 
mother's helpers, 41 girls live at the place of employment, and are entirely self- 
supporting. Three (3) boys are employed in Civilian Conservation Camps, 1 in a 
shoe shop, 1 in a bleachery, 1 clerk in a store, and 1 in a mill. There is on deposit 
in the savings bank $3,000.31 to the account of the individuals employed. 

The average mental level of the employed group is: chronological age, 18 years; 
mental age, 9.7 years; intelligence quotient, 66%. 

We were fortunate in having committed to the Walter E. Fernald State School, 
32; to Wrentham State School, 27; and to Belchertown State School, 25; making 
a^total of 84 commitments during the year. 



Subdivision of Investigation 

The subdivision of Investigation shows in its statistics a slight diminution of cases 
this year. This would seem to indicate the lessening of the strain felt during the 
past years of depression. 

The causes for reception vary little from year to year ; the greatest factor is always 
the removal of the mother. Death, illness, mental disorder or desertion are the 
other predominant factors, as will be seen by the following analysis of children re- 
ceived under General Laws, chapter 119, section 38, or committed under section 
22 of the same chapter: 



Mother dead 

Mother ill 

Mother in hospital for insane or school for the feeble-minded 
Mother deserted ........ 

Mother in correctional institution or deported 



65 
50 
54 
24 
17 



210 

This represents a large proportion of the children received. In addition there are 
many mothers, not enumerated in this list, as those under the supervision of the 



28 P. D. 17 

Industrial School at Lancaster and of the Social Service group of the Division of 
Aid and Relief, who are ofter of such low grade mentality that it is not safe to trust 
to them the supervision and discipline of their children. Several of these will 
eventually be committed to institutions for the mentally deficient. Many others 
are already caring for one child. 

The law requiring the filing of bonds for children brought into the Commonwealth 
to people other than relatives (General Laws, chapter 119, section 30A) is helpful 
in avoiding the presence of deserted children whose legal residence is in some other 
state. In the case of several children's agencies, in other states whose primary 
reason for bringing children into this Commonwealth is to place for adoption, the 
applicatioms are filed with the Adoption Group of this Department and blanket 
bonds are frequently arranged. Other cases are handled by this subdivision and 
it seldom seems wise to allow the placement. 

During the past year an agreement was made with the Boston Council of Social 
Agencies with reference to out-of-state inquiries. All inquiries made by public 
agencies of any sort whether for the transfer of children or for the investigation of 
the social resources of relatives are now referred here. These, of course, refer to 
the placement of children with relatives as all others necessarily are covered by the 
bonding law. Each case is carefully investigated and no permissions are given 
unless protected by the promise that the return of the children will be allowed if 
the relatives can no longer provide for them or if by reason of delinquencies they 
come to the attention of the court. 

Following are the statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation: 

Children Families 

Applications pending December 1, 1935 ..... 354 241 
Applications received December 1, 1935 to November 30, 1936 

(involving 160 reapplications) . . . . .1,113 744 

Total 1,467 985 

Advised only . . . . . . . 32 

Applications withdrawn ....... 30 

Assumed by relatives .....;.. 399 

Assumed by private agencies ...... 72 

Assumed by public agencies . . . . . . .156 

Children committed Sect. 22, Chap. 119, General Laws: 

Boys 39 

Girls 40 

79 64 



Foundlings — 1 male, 2 female. 

Children received Section 38, Chapter 119, General Laws: 

Boys 176 

Girls ........ 132 308 228 

Pending December 1, 1936 391 265 

Total 1,467 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1935 .51 42 

Applications received December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936 202 135 

253 

Disposition as follows : — 

Discharged ......... 131 

Refused 30 

Withdrawn ......... 31 

Pending December 1, 1936 . . . ... 61 44 

Total 253 



Pt. I. 



29 



After Care 

Cases pending December 1, 1935 .... 
Cases added December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936 

Total 

Disposition as follows: 

Closed ........ 

Investigation leads to discharge .... 

Pending December 1, 1936 .... 

Total 



42 
40 

82 

34 
13 
35 

82 



General File 

Pending December 1, 1935 ..... 
Cases added December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936 

Total . . 

Closed . 

Pending December 1, 1936 

Total 



20 
33 

53 

40 
13 

53 



Adoption of Our Wards 



Applications for children for adoption: 
Pending December 1, 1935 
New applications 
Boarding homes reinvestigated . 

Withdrawn .... 
Disapproved without investigation 
Investigated .... 
Pending ..... 



Homes investigated: 
Approved for adoption 
Approved for board . 
Disapproved 



6 
97 
19 



17 

5 

79 

21 



73 
2 

4 



122 



122 



79 



As in previous years, we find the number of applications greatly in excess of the 
number of desirable eligible children. By knowing the extent of available openings, 
however, the best placement of a child can be made. Also, it some imes happens 
that applicants for a child to adopt from this division are directed to a child not in 
the care of the division but for whom an adoptive home is advisable. 

During the year 31 children have been removed from boarding homes and placed 
for the purpose of adoption, and 34 children have been changed from a boarding or 
part-free to an entirely free status in the same home, on trial for adoption. Eight 
(8) of the 31 placed in new homes were between the ages of four and ten years — 
older than the age of children most in demand. These children were not available 
earlier, but continued lack of interest on the part of a parent has now made per- 
manent placement possible. 

The psychiatric and physical studies of the children in the various hospitals and 
clinics are most helpful in the serious matter of deciding a child's future. 

Thirty-eight (38) children have been legally adopted — 23 girls and 15 boys. 
The oldest was a girl of nineteen years and the youngest a boy of nineteen months. 
Two sets of twin girls have been adopted — in one case by the paternal aunt and in 
the other by foster parents. There are now 69 children on trial for adoption. 



30 P. D. 17 

Adoption decrees were granted in the following Probate Courts of the Common- 
wealth : 

Essex 11 Norfolk .... 4 

Suffolk 6 Worcester .... 2 

Plymouth .... 3 Bristol .... 1 

Middlesex . . . . 11 

The usual satisfactory results were obtained in putting through these adoptions. 
When we can locate a parent it is necessary for us to secure his or her consent to 
the child's adoption before presenting the petition. As a rule, these parents offer 
no objections, realizing that the child's best interests will be served by adoption. 
In cases of desertion, where the parents cannot be located, no petition is presented 
unless the child has been supported for at least two years by the Commonwealth. 

Investigations of Adoptions 

Referred by the Probate Courts 

The past year was a most trying one for the workers in the Subdivision of Adop- 
tions, due to the large increase in the number of petitions for the adoption of chil- 
dren under fourteen years of age and to the death of Miss Harriet A. Smith on 
May 16, 1936. Miss Smith was one of the original workers when this group was 
started in July, 1931. She was an intelligent, competent and kindly worker who 
did much to give the group a fine start in a new field. 

The increase in the number of petitions was not spasmodic, but was evenly 
divided over the entire year. Only in one month during the year just past was the 
number of investigations lower than in the corresponding month of the previous 
year. Because of the above mentioned facts, this group was taxed to its utmost 
capacity to handle the work and, at the same time, to maintain the high standard 
of the past five years. 

The fourteen Probate Courts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts sent 833 
petitions for adoption to be investigated. As compared with the preceding years 
the increase is noticeable, because of the steady upward trend in numbers. Yearly 
comparisons for the past five years show the number of petitions for adoption to 
be as follows: during 1932 there were 686; 1933—659; 1934—706; 1935—740; 
1936 — 833. Many reasons may be advanced for such a steady increase, one of 
which is the business recovery. 

Our experience in investigating these cases has convinced us that each child 
should be given a through mental and physical examination, and the result should 
accompany our report i o the Judge of the Probate Court, before action is taken on 
the petition. 

Great progress has been made in raising the standard of adoptions in this Com- 
monwealth in the past few years. Obviously bad adoptions are not allowed and 
so few adoptions of children in poor homes are granted that that phase of the subject 
may be considered at an end. The Judges of the several Probate Courts are in 
accord in refusing to allow children to be placed for life under the care and guidance 
of improper persons. Needless to say, this practice does not apply in cases of blood 
relationship between the petitioners and the child. Where a mother and her hus- 
band, or the child's grandparents or other near relatives are seeking to adopt, 
much more latitude is allowed. In petitions of the above nature it is most grati- 
fying to know that the Judges base their decisions on the facts submitted by this 
Division. 

When the home is an excellent one and the child has a bad background, the opin- 
ions of the Judges and those of social workers are vastly different. One of the basic 
principles in placing children in boarding homes is to place those with certain social 
characteristics in homes where they will find parents with corresponding traits. 
In general, it is the opinion of the Court, that when the petitioners have been in- 
formed of the background of the child, the decision to be made should rest with 
them. If they wish to take the offspring of undesirable parents, they are free to 
do so, provided they have full knowledge regarding the child and his antecedents. 
Of course, this reasoning is at variance with the principles of social work, but who 
can say that it is entirely wrong? 



Pt. I. 



Distribution of Petitions According to Counties 



31 



Middlesex 








228 


Plymouth 








30 


Suffolk . 








180 


Berkshire 








22 


Essex 








105 


Barnstable 








8 


Worcester 








89 


Franklin 








7 


Norfolk . 








74 


Hampshire 








5 


Hampden 








43 


Dukes 








1 


Bristol . 








41 


Nantucket 












Total 



833 



Statistics for the Year Ending November 30, 1936 

Investigations completed through Nov. 30, 1935 

Pending Nov. 30, 1935 

Notices received from courts, Dec, 1935 to Nov. 30, 1936 

Total 



Investigations completed Dec. 1, 1935 to Nov. 30, 1936 
For adoption of legitimate children: 
By relatives . . 
By persons other than relatives 

For adoption of illegitimate children: 
*By maternal relatives ..... 
By "alleged relatives" ..... 
By persons other than relatives 
By relatives by adoption .... 



For adoption of foundlings 

Investigation not required — children over 14 

Withdrawn without investigation 

(Pending Dec. 1, 1936—76) 

Cases reported to Courts: 

Investigated and approved . . . 

Investigated and disapproved 

Withdrawn after investigation (before hearing) 



Notices received showing disposition by courts: 
Approved and granted 
Approved and dismissed . 
Disapproved and dismissed 
Disapproved and granted . 
Withdrawn 



197 
65 



244 
33 

280 

2 



559 

3 
3 
3 



747 

74 

3 



634 

7 

9 

35 

6 



3,092 

74 

833 



3,999 



262 



830 



824 



691 



*Of these, 141 petitions were by the mother and her husband. 



32 



P. D. 17 



Collections received from Cities and Towns and Directly from Parents 
for the Support of Children 



1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 





Cities 




Direct 


and 
Towns 


Total 


16,620 52 


24,651 03 


41,271 55 


25,936 02 


28,545 45 


54,481 47 


34,084 65 


44,816 77 


78,901 42 


41,492 42 


57,433 73 


98,926 15 


33,258 83 


62,771 26 


96,030 09 


29,847 30 


62,623 99 


92,471 29 


31,800 51 


83,775 21 


115,575 72 


32,779 61 


77,703 60 


110,483 21 


29,521 11 


88,827 06 


118,348 17 


30,357 82 


112,790 55 


143,148 37 


30,947 17 


119,954 97 


150,902 14 


28,388 42 


134,348 16 


162,736 58 


33,910 17 


133,944 65 


167,854 82 


30,381 87 


147,683 38 


178,065 25 


25,423 50 


153,310 30 


178,733 80 


20,757 32 


149,139 37 


169,896 69 


19,405 28 


180,033 11 


199,438 39 


22,221 81 


186,458 59 


208,680 40 


22,356 11 


181,298 46 


203,654 57 


27,700 42 


195,531 33 


223,231 75 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age 


in Custody during the Year 




Dependent 


Neglected 


Grand 
Total 




Boys Girls Total 


Boys Girls Total 



Number Dec. 1, 1935 

Received Dec. 1, 1935 to Nov. 30, 1936 


185 
83 


168 
87 


353 
170 


55 

79 


63 
68 


118 
147 


471 
317 


Total number in charge . 
Number transferred to subdivision for 
older children .... 
Number discharged and died . 


268 

60 

28 


255 

64 
20 


523 

124 
48 


134 

28 
12 


131 

41 
20 


265 

69 
32 


788 

193 
80 


Number remaining Dec. 1, 1936. 


180 


171 


351 


94 


70 


164 


515 



Summury of All Children 


in 


Custody during the 


Year 








Delinquent 


Wayward 




Boys 




Girls 


Total 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Number Dec. 1, 1935 

Received Dec. 1, 1935 to Nov. 30, 1936 


179 
120 




89 
32 


268 
*152 




2 
2 


5 
1 


7 
3 


Total number during the year 
Discharged Dec. 1, 1935 to Nov. 30, 1936 


299 
124 




121 
42 


420 
166 




4 
1 


6 
1 


10 

2 


Number Dec. 1, 1936 


175 




79 


254 




3 


5 


8 



* 15 State Wards (11 boys and 4 girls) recommitted as delinquent to Department. 



Pt. I. 33 

Summary of All Children in Custody during the Year — Concluded 







Neglected 




Dependent 






Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Grand 
Total 


Number Dec. 1, 1935 

Received Dec. 1, 1935 to Nov. 30, 1936 


1,995 
385 


1,888 
322 


3,883 
707 


1,944 
217 


1,601 
177 


3,545 
394 


7,703 
*1,256 


Total number during the year 
Discharged Dec. 1, 1935 to Nov. 30, 
1936 


2,380 
284 


2,210 
275 


4,590 
559 


2,161 
221 


1,778 
195 


3,939 
416 


8,959 
1,143 


Number Dec. 1, 1936 


2,096 


1,935 


4,031 


1,940 


1,583 


3,523 


7,816 



Disposition of Children held on Temporary Mittimi, 

Court 



further Orders of the 







Received 


Perma- 








Dis- 






Pending 


During 


nently 








charged 


Pending 




Dec. 1, 


the 


Com- 


Defaulted 


Bailed 


Died 


to 


Dec. 1, 




1935 


Year 


mitted 








Court 


1936 


Neglected . 


116 


367 

2 

106 


159 


1 


- 


1 


197 

2 

91 


125 


Delinquent 


39 


14 


3 


5 


- 


32 


Total . 


155 


475 


173 


4 


5 


1 


290 


157 



Status of Children in Custody during the Year ending November 30, 1936 



In families, receiving wages 

In families, free of expense to Commonwealth 

In families, clothing only provided . 

In families, board and clothing provided 

On parole with parents . 

On parole with other relatives . 

In hospitals .... 

In United States Service . 

In Civilian Conservation Corps 

Married .... 

Whereabouts unknown . 

Total number in charge November 30, 1936 

Died 

Of age ....... 

Transferred to Lyman School . 
Transferred to Industrial School for Boys . 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls . 
Committed to Lyman School . 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys . 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls . 
Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory 
Committed to Reformatory for Women 
Committed to County Training Schools 
Committed to Department of Mental Diseases 
Adopted ...... 

Discharged to places of settlement . 
Otherwise discharged .... 

Total number in custody during the year 



Girls 


Boys 


349 


125 


100 


245 


199 


55 


2,575 


3,202 


131 


181 


55 


67 


149 


151 


— 


31 


— 


121 


27 


5 


17 


31 


3,602 


4,214 


9 


14 


127 


94 


_ 


13 


— 


3 


6 


- 


— 


12 


— 


15 


11 


— 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


— 


6 


45 


39 


23 


15 


3 


12 


288 


406 



4,115 



4,844 



Disposition of Delinquent and Wayward Children by the Courts 



Number of court notices received .... 

Disposition of cases attended: 
Committed to — 

Lyman School for Boys ..... 

Lyman School for Boys and appealed . 

Lyman School for Boys and commitment suspended 

Industrial School for Boys .... 

Industrial School for Boys and appealed 

Industrial School for Boys and commitment suspended 



4,278 



135 
32 

316 

110 
25 

263 



34 



P.I). 17. 



Industrial Sohool for Girls . .... 

Industrial School for (Mils and appealed 

Industrial School for Girls and commitment suspended 

Department of Public Welfare .... 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed 
Department of Public Welfare and commitment suspez 
Child Welfare Division of Boston and appealed . 
Massachusetts Reformatory .... 

Massachusetts Reformatory and appealed . 
Massachusetts Reformatory and sentence suspended 
County Training Schools ...... 

County Training Schools and appealed 

County Training Schools and commitment suspended 

House of Correction 

Plummer Farm School 

Filed 

Appealed from finding 



Held for Grand Jury 

Probation 

Fined . 

Fined and appealed 

Fined and fine suspended 

Continued .... 

Continued in care of Department of 

Failed to appear 

Discharged .... 

Dismissed .... 



Total number of cases attended 



Public Welfare 



ded 



Disposition of Neglected Children by the Courts 

Number of court notices received ......... 

Disposition of cases attended: 
Committed to — 

Department of Public Welfare . 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 
Placed on file ..... 

Discharged. ..... 

Dismissed ...... 

Continued ...... 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children 
Continued and placed in care of Department of Public Welfare 
Failed to appear . . . . . . 

Appealed from finding . ....... 



Total number of cases attended . 



57 

10 

27 

53 

4 

9 

1 

3 

3 

2 

79 

1 

40 

1 

3 

941 

39 

8 

1,829 

43 

3 

9 

1,528 

109 

47 

127 

336 

6,193 



1,145 



407 

3 

43 

35 

3 

38 

816 
47 

329 
20 
13 

1,754 



Localities from which New Children were Committed 



Abington, 4 
Adams, 1 
Amesbury, 1 
Attleboro, 14 
Ayer, 5 
Barnstable, 2 
Beverly, 6 
Boston, 318 
Brockton, 22 
Brookfield, 2 
Brookline, 3 
Cambridge, 65 
Chelsea, 27 
Chicopee, 5 
Concord, 12 
Dedham, 6 
Dunstable, 1 
Everett, 6 
Fall River, 20 
Fitchburg, 10 
Framingham, 30 
Franklin, 1 
Gardner, 18 
Gloucester, 7 



Great Barrington, 6 
Greenfield, 4 
Harvard, 1 
Harwich, 4 
Haverhill, 14 
Hingham, 10 
Holyoke, 14 
Hopkinton, 1 
Hudson, 1 
Lawrence, 21 
Lee, 3 
Leicester, 1 
Leominster, 14 
Lowell, 37 
Lunenburg, 1 
Lynn, 21 
Maiden, 46 
Marlborough, 2 
Mattapoisett, 1 
Melrose, 2 
Methuen, 1 
Middleborough, 6 
Middleton, 2 
Milford, 6 



Millis, 1 
Millville, 1 
Natick, 3 
New Bedford, 20 
Newburyport, 3 
Newton, 2 
North Adams, 7 
Northampton, 9 
North Andover, 1 
North Reading, 9 
Orange, 14 
Palmer, 7 
Peabody, 8 
Pepperell, 3 
Pittsfield, 9 
Plymouth, 12 
Provincetown, 
Quincy, 27 
Revere, 5 
Salem, 45 
Sherborn, 2 
Shutesbury, 2 
Somerville, 23 
Southbridge, 3 



11 



Springfield, 27 
Stoughton, 1 
Swampscott, 2 
Taunton, 12 
Templeton, 1 
Tewksbury, 56 
Tyngsborough, 1 
Uxbridge, 1 
Wakefield, 2 
Walpole, 1 
Waltham, 37 
Ware, 6 
Wareham, 2 
Watertown, 1 
Webster, 6 
Wellesley, 5 
Westfield, 24 
Westborough, 1 
Weymouth, 1 
Whitman, 1 
Williamstown, 1 
Winchendon, 4 
Woburn, 4 
Worcester, 27 

Total, 1,256 



Licensed Boarding Homes for Infants 

During the last official year 518 licenses to maintain boarding homes for infants 
were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 2, in 102 
cities and towns in addition to the 490 licenses in force at the expiration of the 
previous year; 496 expired by the one-year limitation, 3 were revoked, 55 were can- 
celled, and 454 licenses permitting the boarding of 938 infants in 100 cities and towns 



Pt. I. 



35 



remained in force November 30, 1936. Twenty-four (24) applications were with- 
drawn and 2 were refused. 

These represent the licensed homes not only of infants under supervision of the 
Commonwealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out by parents 
and many private agencies. 

The inspector of infant boarding homes made 634 visits during the year, super- 
vising boarding homes and investigating complaints. Three (3) children were re- 
moved under the provisions of chapter 119, section 14. Five (5) nurses made 8,626 
visits to infants placed in foster homes. This number includes 5,613 visits to our 
infant wards, 1,695 visits to infants boarded privately and by agencies, and 1,318 
visits of inspection and investigation. 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of Public 
Welfare from December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936, under General Laws, 
Chap. 119, Sect. 6, which provides for the Protection of Infants and the Licensing 
and Regulating of Boarding Homes for them. 



Supervision of 



Number of 
Infants 
Reported 



Alice Chapin Adoption Nursery, New York City 

American Red Cross, North Attleborough 

Avon Home, Cambridge 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton 

Board of Public Welfare, Andover 

Board of Public Welfare, Bellingham 

Board of Public Welfare, Billerica 

Board of Public Welfare, Brockton . 

Board of Public Welfare, Chicopee . 

Board of Public Welfare, Fitchburg . 

Board of Public Welfare, Lowell 

Board of Public Welfare, Lunenburg 

Board of Public Welfare, Maiden 

Board of Public Welfare, Medford . 

Board of Public Welfare, Methuen . 

Board of Public Welfare, Middleborough 

Board of Public Welfare, Milford 

Board of Public Welfare, New Bedford 

Board of Public Welfare, Newton 

Board of Public Welfare, Norwood . 

Board of Public Welfare, Quincy 

Board of Public Welfare, Taunton . 

Board of Public Welfare, Watertown 

Board of Public Welfare, Webster 

Board of Public Welfare, Winchendon 

Board of Public Welfare, Worcester . 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

Brockton Catholic Charities Center . 

Brockton Family Welfare Society 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston . 

Catholic Welfare Bureau of Fall River 

Chelsea Ladies' Charitable Association 

Child Saving Institute, Omaha, Nebraska 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 

Child Welfare House, Lynn 

Children's Aid Association, Boston . 

Children's Bureau, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston 

Church Home Society, Boston 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Aid and Relief 

Department of Public Welfare, Division of Child Guardianship 

Department of Public Welfare, Girl's Parole Branch . 

Elizabeth Lund Home, Burlington, Vermont 

Fall River Deaconess Home ..... 

Family Welfare Society, Quincy .... 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Lowell 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Swampscott 

Free Synagogue, Child Adoption Committee, New York City 

Girl's Welfare Society, Worcester .... 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester ..... 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association, Holyoke 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association, Springfield 

Haverhill Children's Aid Society .... 

Holy Child Guild, Westfield 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 
House of Mercy, Boston ...... 

Institutions Department, City of Boston . 
Jewish Child Welfare Association. Boston 
Jewish Social Service Bureau, Springfield . 



1 

1 

20 

1 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

6 

4 

1 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

25 

36 

5 

1 

125 

9 

1 

1 

140 

5 

94 

1 

1 

36 

3 

505 

1 

3 

1 

1 

38 

11 



30 P. D. 17 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Center ........... 5 

Lawrence City Mission ............. 2 

Lowell Catholic Charitable Bureau ........... 30 

Lynn Catholic Charities Center . . . . . . . . - . . .15 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Barnstable ..... 1 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Boston ..... 5 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Brockton 11 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Fitchburg ...... 3 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Greenfield ..... 6 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Salem ...... 9 

Mass. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Taunton ..... 5 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society .......... 9 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston ........ 46 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield ........ 9 

Northampton Children's Aid Association .......... 7 

Private 1,013 

Probation Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 

Reformatory for Women, Framingham .......... 11 

St. Anne's Orphanage, Worcester ........... 1 

St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston ........... 35 

Salem Catholic Charities Center ........... 23 

Sisters of Providence, Holyoke ........... 100 

Somerville Catholic Charities Center .......... 7 

Spence Alumni Society, New York City .......... 9 

State Charities Aid Association, New York City ........ 1 

Talitha Cumi Home, Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester ........ 4 

Twin Dam Nursing Home, Towners, New York . . . . . . • . . 1 

Veil Hospital, West Chester, Pennsylvania ......... 1 

Wachusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg ......... 19 

William Street Home, Springfield ........... 4 

Worcester Children's Friend Society . ... . . . . . . 11 

2,681 

The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 2,539. 
Of this number 23 died and 140 were adopted. 



Licensed Maternity Hospitals, 1935-1936 



Licenses in force Dec. 1, 1935 (in 92 cities and towns) 

Expired 

Surrendered and cancelled . 
Revoked . . . 



Continuing in force 
Reissues 
New issues 



Licenses in force Nov. 30, 1936 (in 93 cities and towns) 
Corporations . 
Physicians 

Nurses .... 
Boards of Public Welfare 
Other persons 



87 
6 



85 

7 



133 
18 
23 

4 

7 



186 

93 
93 

92 
185 

185 



There were 267 visits to hospitals for inspection and investigation of complaints. 

The returns from the questionnaires mailed to each licensee show 44,365 cases 
delivered; live births, 43,325; still-births, 1,317; deaths of mothers, 185; deaths of 
babies, 1,187. 

The licensee of each hospital is responsible for the use at every birth of the one 
per cent solution of nitrate of silver furnished by the Department of Public Health 
for the prevention of opthalmia neonatorum. 

Each licensee shall be responsible for the observance of chapter 111, sections 110 
and 111 of the General Laws relative to diseases of the eyes. 

Four (4) licenses to conduct homes for pregnant women were in force on December 
1, 1935. Three (3) licenses expired, 2 were reissued, and one new license was granted. 
Four (4) licenses remained in force November 30, 1936. 



Pt. I. 



37 



Tuition of Children Under the Care and Control of the Department 

Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, as 
appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, governing reimbursements by the Com- 
monwealth for tuition and transportation of state wards in public schools, bills re- 
ceived from 260 cities and towns, for the tuition and transportation of 4,792 children 
amounting to $282,419.47— viz., tuition, $259,723.70, transportation, $22,695.77— 
were audited by the department and paid by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth 
during the year ending November 30, 1936. The location of the children was as 
follows : 



Abington, 10 
Acton, 9 
Acushnet, 8 
Adams, 2 
Agawam, 3 
Amesbury, 4 
Amherst, 25 
Andover, 11 
Arlington, 35 
Ashburnham, 5 
Ashfield, 15 
Ashland, 10 
Athol, 19 
Attleboro, 17 
Auburn : 

1935, 4 

1936, 6 
Avon, 2 
Barnstable, 10 
Barre, 1 
Becket, 7 
Bedford, 11 
Belchertown, 36 
Bellingham, 35 
Belmont, 9 
Berkeley, 18 
Berlin, 8 
Bernardston, 6 
Beverly, 13 
Billerica, 43 
Bolton, 6 
Boston, 281 
Bourne, 7 
Boxford, 1 
Braintree, 3 
Brewster, 1 
Bridgewater, 26 
Brockton, 56 
Brookfield, 4 
Brookline, 2 
Buckland, 27 
Burlington, 9 
Cambridge, 96 
Canton, 29 
Carlisle, 3 
Carver, 5 
Charlemont, 5 
Chelmsford, 78 
Chelsea, 7 
Cheshire, 10 
Chester, 7 
Chicopee, 25 
Clinton, 41 
Colrain, 14 
Concord, 24 
Conway, 19 
Cummington, 4 
Danvers, 13 
Dedham, 26 
Dennis, 1 
Douglas, 3 
Dracut, 23 
Dudley, 3 
Dunstable, 3 
Duxbury, 2 

East Bridgewater, 3 



East Brookfield, 4 
Easton, 27 
Enfield, 8 
Erving, 8 
Everett, 41 
Fair haven, 16 
Fall River, 18 
Falmouth, 7 
Fitchburg, 12 
Foxborough, 22 
Framingham, 97 
Franklin, 52 
Freetown, 12 
Gardner, 1 
Georgetown, 3 
Gill, 2 
Grafton, 18 
Granby, 17 
, Granville, 3 
Greenfield, 22 
Groton, 14 
Groveland, 5 
Hadley, 32 
Halifax, 6 
Hamilton, 1 
Hampden, 14 
Hanson, 3 
Hardwick, 13 
Harvard, 3 
Harwich, 5 
Hatfield, 2 
Hawley, 30 
Heath, 13 
Hingham, 11 
Hinsdale, 6 
Holbrook, 16 
Holden, 18 
Holliston, 28 
Holyoke, 8 
Hopedale, 22 
Hopkinton, 46 
Hudson, 124 
Huntington, 4 
Kingston, 12 
Lakeville, 7 
Lancaster, 12 
Lawrence, 10 
Lee, 1 

Leicester, 35 
Leominster, 29 
Lexington, 38 
Leyden, 8 
Lincoln, 2 
Lowell, 118 
Ludlow, 12 
Lunenburg, 6 
Lynn, 43 
Lynnfield, 6 
Maiden, 50 
Mansfield, 20 
Marblehead, 3 
Marion, 2 
Marlborough, 167 
Marshfield, 1 
Mattapoisett, 7 
Maynard, 3 



Medfield, 5 
Medford, 62 
Medway, 25 
Melrose, 19 
Mendon, 6 
Merrimac, 5 
Methuen, 6 
Middleborough, 9 
Middlefield, 1 
Milford, 38 
Milburv, 22 
Millis, 7 
Milton, 9 
Monson, 19 
Montague, 16 
Natick, 23 
Needham, 3 
New Bedford, 41 
New Braintree, 11 
New Salem, 11 
Newbury, 1 
Newburyport, 2 
Newton, 31 
North Adams, 5 
North Andover, 2 
North Attleborough, 1 
North Brookfield, 21 
Northampton, 30 
Northborough, 9 
Northbridge, 11 
Norton, 4 
Norwell, 3 
Norwood, 5 
Oakham, 1 
Orange, 5 
Oxford, 29 
Palmer, 53 
Peabody, 6 
Pelham, 17 
Pembroke, 14 
Pepperell, 16 
Petersham, 5 
Phillipston, 4 
Pittsfield, 5 
Plainfield, 23 
Plainville, 1 
Plymouth, 11 
Plympton, 3 
Provincetown, 1 
Quincy, 52 
Randolph, 53 
Raynham, 8 
Reading, 43 
Rehoboth, 3 
Revere, 15 
Rochester, 13 
Rockland, 22 
Rowe, 5 
Royalston, 13 
Russell, 2 
Rutland, 7 
Salem, 8 
Salisbury, 2 
Sandwich, 3 
Saugus, 21 



Scituate, 5 
Sharon, 3 
Shelburne, 17 
Sherborn, 6 
Shrewsbury, 33 
Somerset, 14 
Somerville, 109 
Southampton, 3 
Southborough, 21 
Southwick, 2 
Spencer, 19 
Springfield, 41 
Sterling, 7 
Stoneham, 46 
Stow, 4 
Stur bridge, 5 
Sudbury, 7 
Sunderland, 1 
Sutton, 10 
Swampscott, 4 
Swansea, 12 
Taunton, 52 
Templeton, 23 
Tewksbury, 11 
Topsfield, 1 
Tyngsborough, 17 
Upton, 9 
Uxbridge, 5 
Wakefield, 30 
Walpole, 9 
Waltham, 23 
Ware, 78 
Wareham, 47 
Warren, 19 
Washington, 4 
Watertown, 19 
Wa viand, 11 
Webster, 8 
Wellesley, 18 
Wellfleet, 1 
Wendell, 4 
West Boylston, 8 
West Bridgewater, 10 
West Brookfield, 5 
West Newbury, 9 
West Springfield, 15 
Westborough, 33 
Westfield, 17 
Westford, 15 
Westhampton, 6 
Westminster, 7 
Weston, 1 
Westport, 15 
Weymouth, 32 
Whitman, 13 
Williamsburg, 22 
Wilbraham, 1 
Wilmington, 45 
Winchendon, 29 
Winchester, 27 
Winthrop, 2 
Woburn, 129 
Worthington, 1 
Wrentham, 7 
Yarmouth, 4 



38 P. D. 17 

Child Welfare Services 

(Federal Social Security Act) 
Miss Lillian F. Foss, Supervisor 

In Massachusetts the organization for Child Welfare Services, under Title V, 
Section 3 of the Social Security Act, was first set up on April 4, 1936. On that date 
two experienced social workers were assigned to Southern Worcester County to 
make a Child Welfare survey covering twenty-six towns. The purpose of the study 
is to focus attention on the needs of the children in the predominently rural dis- 
tricts, for the protention of the homeless, dependent and neglected children and 
children in danger of becoming delinquent. 

A district office was opened in Southbridge as a central point for activities. A 
supervisor was added to the staff on July 29, 1936. 

In each of the towns, a local committee of five members was formulated repre- 
senting health, education, recreation, public welfare and social service. The local 
boards of public welfare and members of these local committees have shown a 
willingness to co-operate in the Child Welfare problems of their towns. 

An effort has been made to meet the needs of the children in the predominently 
rural districts, by assisting the public welfare officials and others in the community 
who have sought advice in Child Welfare problems confronting them. 

Children found to be feebleminded have been committed to the State School at 
Belchertown, where they will receive proper training and medical care. We have 
worked with all available agencies in formulating plans for the protection of the 
children in need of this particular service. A similar study is to be made in Barn- 
stable County, covering nineteen towns. 

Social Service for Crippled Children 

Miss Margaret MacDonald, Supervisor 
September 1, 1936 

Under the provisions of. General Laws, chapter 71, section 46A, the Departments 
of Public Welfare and Education are made responsible for the supervision of the 
annual census of physically handicapped children of school age. Since it is with 
the supervision of the census of handicapped children that this subdivision is 
largely concerned, and reports are received from the local school boards throughout 
the school year, it has been necessary to make our calendar year coincide more 
closely with the school year. The reports of this subdivision are, therefore, as of 
September 1, to August 31. 

From September 1, 1935, to August 31, 1936, 2,447 children were reported; 
1,656 were new cases and 791 were children previously included in the census and 
on whom follow-up reports were made. During the year, 284 of the cases reported 
were closed out — placed in our inactive files — for the following reasons: 141 had 
recovered; 24 were placed for permanent care in institutions; 25 had died; the re- 
maining 94 had reached the age of 21, moved out of state, or for various reasons 
were no longer in need of supervision. 

Of the children (2,447) reported in the census for the year ending August 31, 
1936, — 2,163 were continued as active cases; 891 of these were crippled; 1,272 were 
suffering from rheumatic fever, rheumatic or organic heart conditions, chorea, other 
chronic medical conditions, defective sight, defective hearing, and epilepsy. 

The following tables give the diagnoses of handicapping conditions in the order 
of their incidence : 

Crippled Children Children Otherwise Handicapped 

318 Rheumatic heart, chorea, and congenital 

139 heart conditions .... 490 

86 Defective eyesight . . . .209 

52 Deaf 112 

44 Epilepsy 69 

29 Other medical — including nephritis, asthma, 

25 glandular disturbance, diabetes, empyema, 

14 cystitis, cervical adenitis, Hodgskin's 



Infantile paralysis 

Cerebral palsy 

Congenital deformities 

Fractures 

Osteomyelitis 

Arthritis 

Bone and joint tuberculosis 

Progressive muscular dystrophy 

Others — including congenital amyotonia 
osteogenesis imperfecta, rickets, syno- 
vitis, hemophilia, and paralysis resulting 
from such conditions as hydrocephalus 
meningitis, and encephalitis 



392 



184 

891 1,272 



Pt. I. 39 

Of the above 2,163 children, 1,687 were receiving treatment as follows: 809 in 
clinics; 723 privately; 155 in institutions, hospitals, or convalescent homes. 

Twelve (12) had completed treatment; 338 were reported as not under active 
treatment; and information regarding the treatment of 126 children reported, was 
incomplete. 

Education was provided for 1935 handicapped children, reported in the census, 
as follows: 964 in their own homes or in hospitals and convalescent homes, where 
they were under treatment; 898 attended the regular public school classes; and 73, 
special schools or classes for the handicapped. 

Of the remaining 228 children: 21 had completed their education; 75 were men- 
tally unable to do school work; 27 were approved for home instruction but because 
they lived in communities where there were not five children unable to attend 
school, the local school committees did not provide education for them; 21 were 
children of pre-school age. Education was not provided for the remaining 84 
children for such reasons as: too ill to receive instruction; awaiting admission to 
hospitals or institutions; to return to school soon; or beyond the compulsory school 
age. 

Parents, teachers, social workers, superintendents of schools, and school nurses, 
continue to confer with this subdivision on special problems relative to handicapped 
children. As a result of such conferences, during the past year 5 children were ad- 
mitted to the Massachusetts Hospital School, 1 to the Industrial School for Crippled 
and Deformed Children, and 1 to the Berkshire School for Crippled Children. 
Besides these, 6 others were recommended for admission to such schools. Two (2) 
children were admitted to Monson State Hospital for Epileptics, and 3 others were 
recommended for admission there. Seventeen (17) children were recommended 
for admission to state schools for the feeble-minded. Twenty-eight (28 were re- 
ferred for psychometric examinations. Sixteen (16) children were recommended 
to suitable clinics for orthopedic, medical, eye or ear examinations, and hospitali- 
zation of one infant in need of orthopedic treatment was arranged. Nine (9) 
were referred to the Division of the Blind, and 6 to the Department of Education, 
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

So many inquiries are being made concerning the Social Security Act, especially 
as it relates to the permanently handicapped and dependent crippled child, we 
believe i' advisable to emphasize certain facts here. 

The administration of the program extending services for crippled children, 
under the provisions of the Social Security Act, has been set up in Massachusetts 
within the State Department of Public Health. The eleven new clinics which that 
department has established throughout the state, added to the already existing 
hospitals and clinics having records of long and excellent service, surely furnish 
ample facilities for the treatment of the crippled children of Massachusetts. 

Representatives of the Federal Administration have made it very clear that 
provision is not made, within the Act, for the education of the crippled child or the 
prolonged care of the permanently handicapped. The responsibility for these 
phases of the crippled child problem, therefore, rests entirely upon the state, and 
the local communities. 

Earlier in this report mention is made of 338 children included in last year's 
census of handicapped children who were not under active treatment. Some 153 
of these are crippled children, permanently handicapped by such conditions as 
birth injuries, infantile paralysis, progressive muscular dystrophy, hydrocephalus 
with paralysis, congenital amyotonia, spina bifida with paralysis of the lower 
limbs, and arthritis deformans. They represent that type of crippled child who, 
in spite of early and prolonged treatment, are still severely handicapped. The 
problems they present are not to be met by active operative or physiotherapy treat- 
ment but rather call for specialized care and training pointing to self-support, or 
care as permanent dependent individuals. Their numbers are augmented by some 
children reported in earlier surveys and, if we are honest in facing the facts, will be 
further augmented by a certain proportion of those still under active treatment. 

Opportunities for specialized care and training of the permanently crippled 
child pointing to a better adjustment to his handicap and, later, partial or full self- 
support, have been provided at the Massachusetts Hospital School at Canton, our 
state school for crippled children; a,t the Industrial School for Crippled and De- 



40 P. D. 17 

formed Children in Boston, a privately endowed day school; and at the two other 
privately endowed institutions — The Berkshire School for Crippled Children in 
Pittsfield, and The Hospital Cottages for Children at Baldwinville. Recently, in 
the latter institution, particular attention has been given to the problems of the 
birth-injured. 

Special vocational training for certain handicapped persons, over sixteen years 
of age, has also been provided within the Department of Education under the 
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

With these opportunities available and the instruction of certain handicapped 
children in their homes, recommended under chapter 71, section 46A, it remains 
the responsibility of the state, and local communities to see that each crippled child 
is given the opportunity for education suited to his needs. This includes the re- 
sponsibility for financial assistance to parents who are unable to pay for the support 
of their child at an institution, during the training which he needs. 

We have been called upon many times, during the past year, to explain to parents, 
relatives, and others interested in children or adults who are hopelessly crippled and 
permanently dependent upon others for support, that there are no provisions for 
them under the Social Security Act, or under special state legislation. All such 
cases had to be referred back to their local boards of public welfare for assistance. 

We know that even parents of moderate means today can hardly make adequate 
provision for the future of their permanently dependent child who may outlive 
them; and the man of small income, while now compelled to make provision for his 
old age, and contribute toward his own and other able-bodied persons' periods of 
unemployment, can make no provision for his dependent crippled child. Respon- 
sibility for the care of these handicapped persons, therefore, eventually rests en- 
tirely with the local communities. As there is no legislation regulating their care, 
the type of care such individuals receive varies and is commensurate with the 
standards of the local board of welfare in administering poor relief. 

Much is being said about "well-rounded plans for crippled children", but state- 
wide plans for crippled children that do not include provisions for the permanently 
home-bound cripple, cannot be considered comprehensive. 

DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING 

Charles M. Davenport, Director 

Walter C. Bell, Executive Secretary 

(41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston) 

On November 30, 1936, the total number of children who were wards of the 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools was distributed as follows: 

Schools 

Lyman School for Boys ..... 

Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls 

831 2,918 3,749 

The total number in the schools on November 30, 1936, is 82 less than on Novem- 
ber 30, 1935. 

The Board of Trustees held 11 regular meetings and 1 special meeting during the 
year, in addition to 33 meetings of various committees. A total of 118 separate 
visits have been made to the three schools by members of the Board of Trustees 
during the year. In addition to these visits made by the trustees, the executive 
secretary of the Board visited the three schools 88 times. 

Boys and girls may be paroled from the training schools at the discretion of the 
trustees. Applications for parole may be made, either in person or by letter, to the 
executive secretary of the trustees, who will see that they are acted upon if the boy 
or girl has been in the training school a reasonable length of time. 

The average length of stay at the three schools was slightly less in 1936 than in 
1935. 



In the 
Schools 


On 
Parole 


Total 


347 
250 
234 


1,283 

1,101 

534 


1,630 
1,351 

768 



Pt. I. 41 

Average Length of Stay 

1935 1936 

Lyman School for Boys ..... 12.79 mos. 11.68 mos. 
Industrial School for Boys . . . 9 . 38 mos. 9 . 50 mos. 

Industrial School for Girls . . . 20 . 56 mos. 18 . 50 mos. 

Boys' Parole Branch 

C. Frederick Gilmore, Superintendent 

On November 30, 1936, there were 2,384 boys on parole in the care of this de- 
partment, 1,283 of whom were on parole from the Lyman School for Boys and 1,101 
on parole from the Industrial School for Boys. This represents a net loss of 113 
boys, as compared with a loss of 97 boys for the year 1935. 

From the Lyman School there were paroled to their own homes, or to relatives, 
371 boys; paroled to foster homes at wages, 54; paroled to foster homes, at board, 
131; a total of 556 boys. From the Industrial School for Boys there were paroled 
447 boys. 

During the fiscal year 369 boys of the total of 1,902 boys on parole, were returned 
to the Lyman School for Boys — 314 for violation of parole and 55 for relocation 
and other purposes. During the same period 142 boys, of the total of 1,598 boys 
on parole, were returned to the Industrial School for Boys. 

The supervision of boys on parole in foster homes is most important. It is es- 
sential that every boy be placed in a foster home where he will do well. In many 
cases this means trying the boy in several foster homes before finding one best 
suited for him. 

Boys paroled to foster homes are those who have no homes, those whose homes 
are too poor to be considered, and those whose homes, even though good, show 
lack of proper supervision. 

The Trustees granted honorable discharge to 54 boys, 20 of whom were on parole 
from the Lyman School for Boys, and 34 on parole from the Industrial School for 
Boys. These boys had done exceptionally well. 

Visits: 25,872 visits were made during the year 1936, — 12,338 to boys on parole 
from the Industrial School for Boys and 13,534 to boys on parole from the Lyman 
School for Boys. 

The savings system instituted by the Trustees years ago has again proved a very 
valuable asset, as many of the wards and their families have been assisted from 
these savings. On November 30, 1936, this department held 222 separate accounts 
for its wards, with total deposits amounting to $6,671.84. 

The sum of $91,126.07 was spent in the care of 3,500 individual boys who were 
in the custody of the Parole Branch for a part or the whole of the year. 

Girls' Parole Branch 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent 

Seven hundred forty-one (741) girls and 55 babies were supervised by the Girls' 
Parole Branch for a part or the whole of the year, and 534 girls were on parole at 
the close of the year. 

Parole is the method by which the institution proves its worth. It is a contin- 
uance of the work of the institution, — the step between the restraint and training 
of the institution and the hazardous freedom of a life in the community. In the 
institution the girl is closely protected from the many temptations and upsetting 
influences of the outside. 

A good place may be the making of one or many girls, therefore it is important 
that we should make critical investigations of what the homes, offered the Division, 
can give to our girls in the way of helpful social relations and opportunities for con- 
tinued training and education. 

Great care is taken to place with each employer the girl best fitted to her needs. 
This matter of suiting the needs both of the girl and of the employer is most essential. 

In the supervision and training of the girls on parole, the visitors are confronted 



42 P.D. 17. 

each year with practically the same obstacles, such as abnormal mentalities, 
n enial instabilities, physical disabilities, and bad habits. Other handicaps are tha 
ignorance and antagonism encountered in some cases, and the intolerant and 
unsympathetic attitudes of many in the communities where the girls live. 

Whether a girl is paroled to her own home, or to a foster home, she requires much 
visiting. Often a visit may last several hours before the subtle truth is discovered 
and the attitude of the girl and relatives, or girl and employer, is made right toward 
each other. It is the visitor's duty to search out every factor that has a bearing on 
the girl's ultimate welfare. She may find that this girl needs only words of en- 
couragement, while that one needs a bit of friendly advice or perhaps a vacation, 
and another needs the impelling force of authority to carry her over what might 
otherwise become a lapse of conduct. 

During the year, 210 girls were paroled from the Industrial School; 143 of them 
were paroled for the first time. The average length of stay at the school was one 
year, six months -and fifteen days. 

Through the year, 85 girls attended school, — 46 in high school, 12 in junior high, 
10 in grammar school, 4 in primary, 3 in special classes, 5 attended continuation 
school, 3 were enrolled in the Boston Trade School, and 2 attended business college. 
Four (4) girls were graduated from high school in June, 1936. 

When a girl has reached her limit of ability to learn, she invariably becomes 
restless and presents a problem. It is necessary to remove her from school and 
put her to work. Whether she does housework for wages, works in a factory, or 
marries, she fills a better place in the community because of her education. 

Forty-two (42) girls were honorably discharged through the year. They were 
girls who had maintained themselves on a level of respectability and efficiency. 

Through the year, 355 individual girls were escorted to hospitals, doctors, and 
dentists 1,225 times. Twenty-eight (28) different hospitals were used. This num- 
ber of hospitals was made necessary by the nature of the case, immediate care being 
called for in several instances. 

During the year (1936), — 232 girls passed out of the custody of the Department; 
114 of them reached their majority (twenty-one years of age); 17 were committed 
to other institutions; and 42 girls were honorably discharged by the Trustees. 

Seldom does the Department hear of an honorably discharged girl, who has not 
lived up to the standard, but very many girls have made much of their lives and 
liave gone way beyond our expectations. 

The total bank savings of 254 girls under 21 years of age, on November 30, 1936, 
amounted to $7,990.19. The largest account was $371.52. There were 13 accounts 
between $100 and $200; 4 accounts between $200 and $300; and 1 account over 
$300. The cash withdrawn through the year by 296 girls amounted to $13,014.31. 
These withdrawals were for clothing, dentists, board, vacation, reimbursements for 
money or articles stolen or destroyed, insurance, and help at home. 

The sum of $54,552.84 was spent in the care of the 741 individual girls and 55 
babies who were in the custody of the Parole Branch for a part or the whole of the 
year. 

TOWN PLANNING 

Edward T. Hartman, Consultant on Town Planning 

[See also P. D. 103 — Annual Report of the Division of Town Planning.] 

Five (5) new planning boards have been established during the year, in Chatham, 
Deerfield, Dracut, Lenox and Whitman. This increases the total to 127. Thirty- 
six (36) cities have boards, 33 towns with over 10,000 inhabitants and 58 towns 
with under 10,000. Carlisle may be credited with being the smallest place with 
both a planning board and zoning. 

Three (3) places have changed their zoning status during the year, not counting 
a number of places making ordinary amendments. There are Andover, which sub- 
stituted a comprehensive by-law for an interim law; Sudbury, which substituted 
more definite use zoning for an interim law; and Scituate, which adopted a some- 
what elementary law. This total of 82 zoned places includes 52 cities and towns 
with over 10,000 inhabitants and 30 towns with under 10,000. 

The new board in Chatham is actively at work on a zoning scheme, and the 



Pt. T. 43 

Dracut board has organized a number of committees for studying special problems. 
Things are happening which cost considerable sums of money, and much of this 
money could be far more effectively spent if every town and city carefully con- 
sidered the best way of doing every item of work. An industry capitalized at the 
assessed value of any town, even the smallest town, would not think of proceeding 
with alterations or with expansion of any kind without careful planning as to 
methods of production and of expansion. When planning boards will take their 
work in the same spirit in which a board of directors takes its work, our towns can 
become far more effective in the functioning of all their activities, far less expensive 
and far more comfortable as places in which to live. 

Many of our most beautiful towns are being ruined by shack developments, both 
for permanent and summer use, and by an indiscriminate scattering of filling 
stations, roadside stands, road houses, dance halls and billboards over large areas. 
The people become alarmed, but generally only after much damage has been done. 
One may find a doctor who can help him a little when he is ill, but it requires the 
best of civic doctors operating for many years to cure a sick town. Many towns 
are just beginning to realize that they are not well. 

A planning board, made up of people with imagination, initiative and power of 
leadership, has an opportunity to do many things which will benefit the town 
through all future time. Towns should be steered. Mere drifting causes a town 
to arrive nowhere in particular. Mazzini said that the honor of a country depends 
much more on removing its faults than on boasting of its qualities. This applies 
to towns. And the people make the town. A town fine in all ways is a sure badge 
of a live and sound-minded people. 

Zoning Violations 

Zoning violations are numerous. This is coming to be recognized, and people 
are demanding a remedy. There are legalized, so-called, violations, where boards 
of appeal permit unlawful intrusions. To solve these problems, citizens have to 
go to court and overturn the work of the boards, as has been done repeatedly in 
Massachusetts and elsewhere. Other violations arise from improper action by 
building inspectors. Still others come from action by builders, who proceed without 
permits. 

The expense of correcting these errors should not have to fall on private citizens. 
If boards of appeal were consistent in their actions, in short, if they followed the 
court decisions, and if building inspectors were persistent in performing their duties, 
it would almost never be necessary for a private citizen to go to court to correct an 
error. Citizens have to proceed against the boards of appeal when they go too far, 
and they have to proceed against the building inspector when he goes too far or 
carelessly allows violations. 

When a citizen proceeds against the building inspector, the town has to pay the 
cost of defending the inspector, and the citizen has to pay the cost of defending the 
town and securing due endorsement of a law. Building inspectors should always 
say "no" when a man applies for anything illegal or even when the building in- 
spector is in doubt. When a violator proceeds without a permit the building 
inspector should order him to stop and should then take it to the Town Counsel. 
This procedure does not cost the town one cent more than the other method, and 
the town and its agents are spending the people's money in the interests of the peo- 
ple, instead of against the interests of the people. They are, at the same time, not 
requiring private individuals to bear the costs of court procedure while, at the 
same time, these individuals are taxed to hire people to fight against them. 

Are We Really Planning? 

For some time there has been dissatisfaction with the results of our efforts at 
planning. The type of organizations and minds now expressing this discontent 
is such that it no longer can be ignored. 

The National Association of Real Estate Boards, through its secretary, says that 
zoning and city planning on a large scale so far have failed. He says: — "Our cities 
are certainly no better than they were twenty years ago. Of course the apologists 
for city planning and zoning can well say that it might be worse. I am inclined to 



u 



P.D. 17. 



doubt it." Towards a solution the Association proposes a new type of governmental 
unit, the neighborhood. "Our neighborhood proposal is an attempt to start plan- 
ning with a unit small enough to handle." The effort seems to be due to the fact 
that present governmental units do not function towards the protection of the 
areas most needing protection. The authorities do not enough consider local needs 
and the proposal is to give the control into the hands of the locality affected. 

Frederick L. Ackerman, quoted with approval by the Federal Housing Admin- 
istration, asserts that zoning has not restricted, except in matters of little impor- 
tance, and that it has not stabilized property values. The difficulty, in his opinion, 
is that we have attempted to give the sanction of law to fantastic expectations in 
regard to real estate values, which expectations are not justified by the possibility 
of net earnings in urban communities. This is done by excessive zoning for the pur- 
poses supposed to produce the higher values. He then asserts that it is highly 
probable that the area now actually used for business and industry approximates 
the maximum requirements for all time. He urges that we bring zoning within 
the domain of the probable and that we establish districts which have a rational, 
functional relationship to each other. 

We have plenty of evidence in our own state as to the situation. Indications are 
that the people of Springfield have succumbed to the allurements of the beauticians 
and have admitted them to the most restricted districts. In a like manner, the 
city of Lowell has succumbed to the undertakers, who now may be admitted by the 
Board of Appeals to the most restricted districts. 

City councils and town meetings are lax in regard to spot zoning, which is one 
of the reasons for the statement by the national group above quoted. The work 
is poorly done in the first instance, and then it is further broken down by spot 
zoning. One town recently held a special town meeting to consider 9 applications 
for spot zoning. It passed 8 of them. And yet it claims to be a zoned town. 

Our zoning systems are weak; and the administration is, in too many instances, 
weak. The strongest element in the whole movement is the courts, which have 
quite effectively pointed the way in their decisions. Six (6) Massachusetts decisions 
set definite limits to the power of boards of appeal towards breaking down zoning 
laws, but these decisions greatly increase the power of such boards towards sound 
zoning administration. 

In all machines we aim at functional efficiency. Why not do the same in plan- 
ning? Planning is the means towards a town that is what a town ought to be. 
Planning is not an end, but a means to an end. Until we recognize and clearly 
conceive the end we cannot effectively work out the means. 

Planning Board Activities 

Boards Established 



Amesbury 

Amherst* 

Andover* 

Arlington 

Ashland* 

Attleboro 

Athol 

Auburn* 

Barnstable* 

Bedford* 

BelmoDt 

Beverly 

Billerica* 

Boston 

Bourne* 

Brain tree 

Bridge water* 

Brockton 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Canton* 

Carlisle* 

Chatham* 

Chicopee 

Clinton 

Concord* 



Danvers 

Dartmouth* 

Dedham 

Deerfield* 

Dracut* 

Duxbury* 

Easthampton 

East Longmeadow* 

Everett 

Fairhaven 

Fall River 

Falmouth* 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Franklin* 

Gardner 

Gloucester 

Great Barrington* 

Greenfield 

Hanover* 

Haverhill 

Hingham* 

Holyoke 

Hudson* 

Hull* 

Lawrence 



Lenox* 


Northbridge* 


Tisbury* 


Leominster 


Norwood 


Wakefield 


Lexington* 


Oak Bluffs* 


Walpole* 


Longmeadow* 


Paxton* 


Waltham 


Lowell 


Peabody 


Watertown 


Lynn 


Pittsfield 


Wayland* 


Lynnfield* 


Plymouth 


Webster 


Maiden 


Quincy 


Wellesley 


Manchester* 


Randolph* 


Westborough* 


Mansfield* 


Reading* 


West Boylston* 


Marblehead* 


Revere 


Westfield 


Medfield* 


Salem 


Weston* 


Medford 


Saugus 


West Springfield 


Melrose 


Scituate* 


Westwood* 


Methuen 


Sharon* 


Weymouth 


Middleborough* 


Shrewsbury* 


W T hitman* 


Milford 


Somerville 


W'ilbraham* 


Millis* 


Southborough* 


Wilmington* 


Milton 


Southbridge 
Springfield 


Winchester 


Natick 


Winthrop 


Needham 


Stockbridge* 


Woburn 


New Bedford 


Stoneham 


Worcester 


Newton 


Stoughton* 


Yarmouth* 


North Adams 


Sudbury* 




Northampton 


Swampscott 




North Attleborough 


Taunton 





* Under 10,000 population. 
No Boards: Adams, Chelsea, Marlborough, Newburyport. 



Pt.l. 



45 



Cities and Towns which have been Zoned 



Comprehensive 


Comprehensive — Cont . 


Partial 


Brockton 


Nov., 


1920 


Lynnfield 


Nov. 


1929 


Marshfield June, 1926 


Brookline 


May, 


1922 


Wilbraham 


Feb., 


1931 


Fall River Sept., 1927 


Longmeadow 


July, 


1922 


Natick 


Mar. 


1931 


Scituate Mar., 1936 


Springfield 


Dec, 


1922 


Hull 


Mar. 


1931 




Newton 


Dec, 
May, 


1922 
1923 


Westfield 

Great Barrington 


Aug., 
Mar., 


1931 
1932 




West Springfield 




Cambridge 


Jan., 


1924 


Carlisle 


Feb., 


1933 


Prepared but Not Adopted 


Lexington 


Mar., 


1924 


Sharon 


Mar., 


1933 




Melrose 
TV inchestei 


Mar., 

Mar., 


1924 
1924 


Dover 

Wilmington 


Mar., 
July, 


1933 

1934 




Amesbury 
Amherst 


Arlington 


May, 


1924 


Wayland 


Sept. 


1934 


Boston 


June, 


i924 


Andover 


Mar., 


1936 


Woburn 


Jan., 


1925 








Attleboro 
Beverly 


Belmont 


Jan., 


1925 








Needham 


Mai., 


1925 


Use 






Billerica 

Bourne 

Braintree 

Canton 

Chatham 

Chelsea 

Chi copee 

Clinton 

Duxbury 

Easthampton 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Gardner 

Hingham 

Leominster 

Littleton 

Manchester 

Marion 


Walpole 


Mar., 
Mar., 


1925 
1925 








Stoneham 








Waltham 

Haverhill 

Medford 

Wakefield 

North Adams 

Somerville 

New Bedford 

Watertown 

Fairhaven 

Falmouth 


July, 
Oct., 
Oct., 
Nov., 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Jan., 
Feb., 
Apr. 


1925 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1926 
1926 
1926 


Milton 

Holyoke 

Swampscott 

Dedham 

Chelsea 

Paxton 

Worcester 

Wellesley 

Salem 

Hudson 


July, 
Sept. 
Apr., 
May, 
June, 
Dec, 
Dec, 
Mar., 
Nov., 
Mar., 


1922 
1923 
1924 
1924 
1924 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1927 


Reading 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Maiden 

Everett 


May, 

June, 

July 

July, 

July, 


1926 
1926 
1926 
1926 
1926 


Bedford 
Middleton 
Stockbridge 
Sudbury 


Mar., 
Apr., 
Feb., 
Mar., 


1928 
1933 
1934 
1936 


Norwood 
Gloucester 


May, 

Nov., 


1927 
1927 








Medfield 








Middleborough 


Pittsfield 


Dec, 


1927 


Interim 






Nahant 


Marblehead 


Apr., 
Apr., 


1928 
1928 








Northampton 


Weston 








North Attleborough 


Concord 


Apr., 


1928 


Taunton 


Sept. 


1925 


Plymouth 


Agawam 


Apr., 


1928 


Marlborough 


Jan., 


1927 


Quincy 
Shrewsbury 


East Longmeadow 


Apr. 


1928 


Petersham 


Mar., 


1927 


Saugus 


June, 


1928 


Oak Bluffs 


Apr., 


1927 


Southbridge 


Lincoln 


Mar., 


1929 


Northampton 


Sept. 


1927 


Wenham 


Westwood 


Mar., 


1929 


Bai nstable 


June, 


1929 


Westborough 


Revere 


July, 


1929 


Attleboro 


May, 


1930 


Yarmouth 


Winthrop 


Oct., 


1929 


Peabody 


June, 


1930 





STATE BOARD OF HOUSING 

Sidney T. Strickland, Chairman 

J. Fred Beckett Fred J. Lucey 

John Carroll Henry J. Ryan 

Charles P. Norton, Architectural Advisor 

John F. Lehane, Executive Secretary 

[See also P. D. 154 — Annual Report of the State Board of Housing.] 

The missionary work in which this Board has been engaged since its creation 
under the law was continued with great zeal during the past year. Inasmuch as 
the only money available for low-cost housing was Federal money, the Board has 
constantly called to the attention of the officials at Washington, the co-operation 
and appropriations to which this Commonwealth is entitled, and because of these 
efforts actual and practical results were brought about during the year. While 
the Federal Government made no payments of appropriations to the Common- 
wealth in the years 1934 and 1935, we knew that because of the need of housing, 
appropriations would be made at some time; therefore, numerous surveys were 
made so that they might be available and useful when appropriations were allotted. 
An instance of the value of this vision may be found in the survey of vacancies 
which the Board conducted in the city of Cambridge. This survey was so complete 
and the co-operation of the Board with agencies in Cambridge so harmonious and 
practical, that the people who lived in the area demolished were rehoused with 
practically no inconvenience to them. 

When the projects in Cambridge and South Boston began, the Board brought 



46 



P.D. 17. 



about many conferences with different agencies interested in housing, including 
the Massachusetts Real Estate Exchange and the Boston Real Estate Exchange, 
and because of these conferences the groups conferred with were brought to recog- 
nize the necessity for progressive amendments to existing housing laws. 

At a meeting of the Board on December 23, 1935, Sidney T. Strickland was 
re-elected Chairman, and by virtue of Chapter 449 of the Acts of 1935, the Reverend 
Thomas B. Reynolds was appointed by this Board to serve for a term of three years 
on the Boston Housing Authority. 

During the year there was introduced in the Federal Congress, the Wagner- 
Ellenbogen Housing Bill. The Board exercised a great deal of effort that might 
help in bringing about the enactment of this proposed legislation. It contacted 
many social, labor and other groups and solicited their aid for the enactment of 
the bill. The bill was approved by this Board and through our influences it was 
approved by all the housing authorities in the Commonwealth. When hearings 
on the bill were heard in Washington, this Board was represented. Because of 
the publicity that grew out of the presentation of the Wagner-Ellenbogen Housing 
Bill, much interest was aroused in the Commonwealth, and following the develop- 
ment of this new interest, a bill was drafted by the Board which, if enacted, would 
"allow the cities and towns of Massachusetts to participate financially in the crea- 
tion of low-cost housing projects." One of the earliest opinions expressed by this 
Board was that low-cost housing is a local, more than a Federal, problem, and it is 
interesting to note that finally the Federal Government accepted this reasoning 
and is stressing it, in order that laws to this end might be enacted and local re- 
sponsibility and activities increased. 

Due to the urgent request of the Board a housing authority was created in the 
City of Chelsea, and on February 24, 1936, the Board appointed Sebastian Tangusso 
as its member to the Housing Authority. 

At the request of Governor Curley, the Board conducted a survey as to the 
damage done by the flood in the Merrimac and Connecticut valleys in the early 
part of 1936. The results of this survey are summarized below: 

Summary of Housing Survey in Connecticut Valley — March 24, 1936 



Location 

Turners Falls 

Greenfield 

Northfield 

Orange . 

Northampton 

Holyoke 

Hadley . 

South Hadley 

Chicopee 

Westfield 

Springfield 

West Springfield 

Miscellaneous 

Total . 



Number of 
Houses 
Damaged 


Number op 

Houses 
Destroyed 


12 


- 


70 


3 


20 


1 


150 


- 


555 


- 


175 


- 


250 


20 


20 


5 


1,200 
37 


25 

1 


156 


- 


1,600 
200 


20 
20 



4,445 



95 



In order that the people afflicted by the flood might be relieved, the information 
we secured was turned over to the city and town officials in the areas affected and 
also to Federal Housing officials. 

The Board is happy to report that two more deferred payment purchasers have 
completed payment on their homes in th^ Lowell Homestead and received clear 
titles to their properties. Legislation filed by the Board would permit enlarging 
this modest but very successful project. 

Upon request of the Board, Governor Curley on May 25, 1936, sent a special 
message to the legislature urging passage of the legislation filed by the Board. 



Pt. I. 



47 



One part of this legislation would have permitted the Board to enlarge the Lowell 
Homestead project. 

In June the Board arranged for the National Association of Housing Officials 
a two day conference of all housing officials in the Commonwealth. Many interest- 
ing phases of the housing problem were discussed at this conference such as ways 
and means of a local housing authority taking over federally built projects, manage- 
ments of these projects, future policies of authorities in the creating of projects, 
proper method to proceed to obtain loans. The merits of the rehabilitation project 
at Chicopee that was sponsored by the Board and approved by the Federal Housing 
Authority and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation proved the highlight of the 
meeting. This being the first project of its type in the country to receive the 
approval of the Federal officials. On October 9, 1936, the Board adopted Rules 
and Regulations that were to govern this Chicopee project and other projects of 
the same type. These Rules and Regulations were approved by the Governor and 
Council. On October 27, 1936, the Board appointed David A. Goggin as its repre- 
sentative on the Chicopee Falls Housing Corporation. 

President Roosevelt made several statements stressing the necessity of a long 
range low-cost housing program that stimulated considerable interest in certain 
communities. Conferences with local authorities were held by the Board as a 
result of which the Board approved and submitted two new low-cost housing 
projects to the Housing Division at Washington for consideration. These sites 
have been visited by Federal officials and received their tentative approval. 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE DEPARTMENT 

The following brief statements relate to the general supervision of each of the five 
institutions under the Department. These reports are followed by comparative 
and more detailed consideration of the financial administration of the institutions. 
Further details about the work of the various institutions may be found in the 
institution reports which are published separately. 



THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY 

Lawrence K. Kelley, LL.B., M. D., Superintendent 
Trustees 
Frederick W. Enwright, Lynn, Chairman. 
Margaret M. O'Riordan, Boston, V ice-Chairman. 
Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham, Secretary. 
Robert M. Beirne, Lawrence. 
James C. Coughlin, D.M.D., Lowell. 
Daniel J. Coughlin, Lowell. 
William F. Maguire, D.M.D., Randolph. 

[See also P. D. 26 — Annual Report of the Trustees of the State Infirmary.] 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $3,896,425.59. 
Normal capacity of plant, 3,150. Value per unit of capacity, $1,236.96 
Provides infirmary care for indigent persons not chargeable for support to any 
city or town. 

Numbers 



Males 



Females 



Total 



Number December 1, 1935 






2,040 


933 


2,973 


Admitted during year 






3,149 


775 


3,924 


Discharged during year 






2,937 


803 


3,740 


Remaining November 30, 1936 . 






2,252 


905 


3,157 


Individuals under care during year 






— 


— 


6,277 


Daily average inmates during year 






2,050.18 


927.11 


2,977.29 


Daily average employees during year 






280.77 


375.93 


656.70 


Largest census during year 






— 


— 


3,206 


Smallest census during year 






- 


- 


2,707 



Records show that during the year 6,897 persons have been cared for, 5,189 males 
and 1,708 females, 656 more than the previous year. At the end of the fiscal year 
there were 3,157 persons in the institution, 184 more than the previous year. The 



48 P. D. 17 

largest daily census was 3,206 on February 12, 1936, and the smallest daily census 
was 2,707 on June 29, 1936. There were 593 deaths. 

Of the cases cared for during the year, 6,665 were in the general hospital wards 
of which 5,369 were males and 1,296 were females. Of his number 1,465 were 
discharged well, 1,007 were improved, 980 not improved, 563 died, and 2,650 re- 
mained in the hospital at the end of the year. Of the number cared for in the 
hospital, there were 463 cases of tuberculosis, 413 of alcoholism, 137 of syphilis and 
25 infectious or contagious diseases. 

Among the 563 deaths there were 104 due to tuberculosis of the lungs; 53 to 
cancer; 279 to cardiac vascular diseases; 31 to lobar and broncho-pneumonia. 

In the tuberculosis hospitals, the number of patients treated, 457, shows a de- 
crease of 180 cases over the previous year. Of the number treated 344 were males 
and 113 females. There were 171 cases discharged; 12 well, 95 relieved, 64 not 
relieved and 104 died — 79 males and 25 females. Of the extra pulmonary type of 
tuberculosis, there were 10 cases: 1 of the peritoneum, 5 of the vertebral column, 
1 of joints, 1 of the lymphatic system and 2 of the genito-urinary system. At the 
end of the year 147 males and 35 females remained in the tuberculosis hospitals. 

The necessity of increasing the bed capacity in the men's hospital is a most 
needy requisite and has become more apparent during the past year because of 
the constant increase in the number of hospital admissions. We have reached a 
new high on male patient admissions, the number during the past year being 3,149 
as compared with that of the previous year of 2,457. The assistance afforded by 
the increase in personnel — the addition of a greater number of internes — has been 
very helpful. During the year 486 operations were performed in the men's hospital. 

In the women's department there was a total of 569 admissions, which, added 
to the 443 at the institution at the beginning of the year, made a total of 1,012 
cared for; 546 were discharged, including 99 deaths, and 456 remained in the wards 
at the end of the year. In the maternity ward there were 195 cases of pregnancy, 
with 160 deliveries, including eight stillbirths, 12 premature births, and 1 Cesarean 
Section. 

In the venereal clinic 103 cases of gonorrhea and 66 new cases of syphilis were 
treated. 

A complete physical examination was given all patients in the women's house 
and in the South end of the female hospital, during, the year. 

In the women's hospital, 102 operations were performed. 

The statistics for the department for the insane are for the twelve months be- 
ginning October 1, 1935, and ending September 30, 1936. There was but 1 ad- 
mission to the department during the year, 1 female patient transferred from 
boarding out. Twenty-nine (29) deaths occurred — 7 men and 22 women; 3 pa- 
tients were discharged from the books during the year, 1 of whom was recovered, 
and the other 2 unimproved. 

Sixty (60) patients of the general hospital department were legally committed 
to other state hospitals; 75 young women patients of the general hospital depart- 
ment — sex problem cases — were given mental examinations, and 25 juvenile offen- 
ders were studied in the Lowell Court. 

Entertainments such as moving pictures, dances, parties, plays, corn roasts, 
picnics, and rides were provided as in other years. Every attempt was made to 
keep as many patients occupied as was possible but the advancing years of the 
patients in our mental wards, with their enfeeblement, together with the fact that 
no new cases are being committed to this department, is steadily decreasing the 
number of those who are able to be of much real assistance, so that it is difficult to 
find sufficient patient help for the mental wards, without attempting to lend assis- 
tance to other departments as in the past. There are usually about 12 men from 
this department who help with the farm work, whereas ten years ago, 50 to 100 
were steadily occupied with the farm work. 

Improvement has been noted in the condition of the clothing of the women pa- 
tients, and also in the food; wards have been brightened and a beauty parlor will 
be opened shortly. 

The increase in the number of very aged demented men and women not only 
in the mental wards but in the general wards as well, is a problem to be considered. 
There are many of these aged patients who cannot be committed as insane as they 



Pt. I. 49 

are too feeble to be transferred to other institutions, under commitment. We an- 
ticipate that there will be a steady increase in this group and believe that special 
plans will eventually have to be made for their care. 

The occupational therapy department has been conducted under the direction 
of our trained workers, all graduates of the Boston School of Occupational Therapy. 
There have been no changes in the personnel during the past year. A system of 
rotating for the ward therapists has been in use for more than a year and found 
quite successful. Each therapist spends three months at the men's hospital, the 
tuberculosis hospitals, and the women's hospital. An average of 157 patients, 
monthly, have been reached by this department — 35 in the central workshop for 
men, 28 in the men's hospital, 74 in the women's hospital, 14 in the Fiske and 6 in 
the Bancroft. 

The training school for nurses has found many changes necessary to maintain its 
standing with the State Board of Registration for Nurses. These changes have 
been accomplished and the training school retains its usual rating. On October 1, 
1936, 26 intermediate students were sent to the Boston City Hospital for affiliation, 
and a new class of 27 preliminary students were admitted on this date. During 
October and November, 16 senior students have returned from the Boston City 
Hospital after completing their affiliation. 

The x-ray department continuously shows an increase in the total amount of 
work performed. An important and satisfying feature is the routine, yearly x-ray 
check-up of chests of our hospital employees. Gastro-intestinal x-ray studies are 
steadily increasing in number and the need of a physician to devote all of his time 
to x-ray work becomes increasingly evident. 

In the dental department there have been 2,387 chair patients; 1,911 extractions 
in addition to much laboratory work, treatments, etc. 

The results of the farm crops were gratifying, with a production of 306 tons of 
green feed, 250 tons of hay, and 740 tons of ensilage. The garden crops showed 
a substantial gain and kept the institution well supplied with green vegetables 
during the summer, and a good supply of squash, cabbage, carrots, beets and 
turnips were stored for winter consumption. 

The total milk production from our dairy herd of thoroughbred Holstein stock 
was 1,682,682 pounds. A total of 23,636 pounds of veal and beef was killed for 
institution use; 87,877 pounds of pork were produced, an increase of over 12,000 
pounds over the previous year. The poultry farm yielded 23,760 dozen of eggs, 
and supplied 16,707 pounds of poultry for institution use. This is a considerable 
increase over the previous year. 

The new kitchen and dining room building, a P.W.A. project, including all equip- 
ment, was completed and opened for service on July 9, 1936. 

The new storehouse, a P.W.A. project, has been fully equipped and in use since 
June 8, 1936. 

Forty-eight thousand (48,000) square feet of roofs have been repaired; 2,100 
feet of woven wire fence, 9 feet high, were erected; 3,000 square feet of brickwork 
pointed; a subway 221 feet long built from the women's hospital to nurses' hall 
No. 2; and 6,600 feet of sewer pipe laid. 

A W.P.A. project for 4 new filter beds, 125 x 90 feet, is nearing completion; also, 
under a W.P.A. project, 30 existing filter beds have been dug out, refilled and put 
in working condition. The excavation work has been completed and a footing wall 
built at the Stonecroft building for a new toilet section. 

With an appropriation of $1,270,005 plus $32,148.09 brought forward from 
balance of 1935, the total amount available for maintenance was $1,302,153.09. 
Of this amount $1,266,191.79 was expended. Of the amount expended $618,730.18 
was for salaries, wages and labor, $647,461.61 for all other expenses. Net weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance; $8,123. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $165,949.59. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$1,100,242.20. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average 
number of inmates, 4.5. 



50 



P. D. 17 



INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER 

(Under the Department of Correction) 

James A. Warren, Superintendent 

Provides infirmary care for indigent persons (male) not chargeable to any city 
or town. The data following are for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1936. 

Numbers 

Number Jan. 1, 1936 4 

Admitted during year . . . . . . . . . .14 

Discharged during year . . . . . . . . .15 

Remaining Dec. 31, 1936 3 

Individuals under care during year ....... 18 

Daily average inmates during year ....... 4 

Largest census during year ......... 8 

Smallest census during year ......... 3 

Deathsjiuring year (included in discharged) ...... 2 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 
Trustees 
William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline, Chairman. 
Robert F. Bradford, Cambridge. 
W. Russell MacAtjsland, M.D., Boston. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D., Boston. 
Lothrop Withington, Brookline. 

[See also P. D. 82 — Annual Report of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital School.] 

Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 
$930,693.02. Normal capacity of plant, 331. Value per unit of capcaity, $2,811.76. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and deformed children of the Common- 
wealth; those between the ages of five and fifteen and mentally competent to attend 
public schools are eligible for admission. Medical and surgical treatment for minor 
wards under the care of the Division of Child Guardianship is also provided. 



Number Dec. 1, 1935 . 
Admitted during year . 
Discharged during year 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1936 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year . 
Smallest census during year . 

There were in the institution on November 30, 1935, 293 children, of whom 33 
were sick minor wards received from the Division of Child Guardianship. ^ There 
have been admitted 329 patients, of whom 281 were minor wards received for 
hospital care only. The whole number under treatment during the year was there- 
fore 622, or 314 children for temporary hospital care and 308 who were eligible for 
both hospital and school departments. 

The maximum number present at any one time was 293 and the minimum 139. 
The daily average number was 258 or 234 orthopedic cases and 24 sick minor wards. 
Including children who were temporarily absent on visit, the average enrollment 
for the year was 289. 

The discharges numbered 353, of whom 275 were minor wards, leaving in the 
institution at the end of the year 39 sick minor wards and 230 Hospital School 
children. Of the discharges, 2 never should have been admitted and were trans- 



Numbers 






Males 


Females 


Total 


155 


138 


293 




168 


161 


329 




192 


161 


353 




131 


138 


269 




- 


- 


318 




133.83 


125.13 


258.96 


r 


44.30 


99.33 


143.63 




- 


- 


293 




- 


- 


139 



Pt. I. 51 

f erred to the Massachusetts General Hospital; 249 had recovered; 64 had improved, 
of whom 62 were able to attend a public school; 13 were physically or mentally 
unpromising for further advancement; 1 left to enter the Shriners' Hospital; 2 had 
prepared for high school training at the Industrial School for Crippled and De- 
formed Children in Boston; 2 had qualified for apprenticeship training in watch 
repairing under the guidance of the Rehabilitation Department of the State Board 
of Education; 9 were capable of self-support; 6 who were referred for operation 
were found to be poor surgical risks; 1 was discharged following readmission for 
examination, having remained overnight; 1 was taken against advice; 1 was out 
on visit at end of year, and 2 children died. 

Of the admissions, 290 were natives of Massachusetts, 22 of other New England 
states, 9 of other states, 3 of foreign countries and the birthplaces of 5 were unknown. 

The age of the youngest patient admitted was 1 month and 3 days, and of the 
oldest 19 years, 6 months and 25 days. 

Two hundred five (205) surgical operations were performed during the year; 
of these, 162 were tonsillectomy and adenectomy. 

Of children's diseases, there were 48 cases of mumps and 2 of chicken-pox. 

The dentist reported 1,584 dental operations divided as follows: 984 fillings; 
142 extractions; 122 x-rays; 282 treatments; 48 fissures polished; 6 porcelain jackets. 
Seventy-eight (78) impressions were taken of cases who either presented malfor- 
mations of dental arches or mouths that required close observation for future de- 
velopment. The dental hygienist performed 1,597 prophylaxes. One hundred 
sixty-two (162) cases were checked up daily with instruction in the use of the tooth- 
brush or for gum stimulation. 

In extending and perfecting the best methods of physical therapeutics, members 
of the staff, in co-operation with the physiotherapist, are impressed with the im- 
portance of taking a comprehensive view of the whole individual child rather than 
of merely a part. The majority of patients selected for physiotherapy receive 
treatment six days per week and the physiotherapist observes that children follow 
the time closely and voluntarily report for treatment as an advantage to be gained 
rather than a task to be endured. During the year there were 4,970 treatments for 
corrective exercises, 3,220 for baking, exercises and massage, 740 for training in 
locomotion and 1,220 for heliotherapy. 

The school registered through the school year 256 pupils. 

Last year's enthusiasm in the organization of hobby clubs caused classes to 
continue at the opening of school in September in the following subjects: Dra- 
matics, Poetry, Music, Art, Nature, Travel, Science, The Cinema, Handicraft, 
Braille and Philately. Evening meetings have been held every two weeks for 
recreation and profit in the chosen courses of study. Members of the staff have 
co-operated with the teachers in this generous voluntary service, from which the 
children are receiving much pleasure and inspiration. 

The commercial class has had much practical work this year in typewriting, by 
taking over the copying of the menus and other typewriting for various depart- 
ments in the school. 

Graduation exercises by the class of 16 were devoted to the history of education 
in Massachusetts. 

The medical and nursing service for the promotion of body health naturally 
commands the greatest respect; athletic sports and opportunity for self-expression 
without the feeling of inferiority which comes from competition with physical 
superiors are recognized as the chief benefit of many; others find inspiration from 
their association with considerate employees in the offices, on the farm, at the 
sewing-room, printing shop or in the domestic department. The influence of 
teachers and class activities, including the social life of the school, make the deepest 
impression upon a large number who feel indebted to the school for their accom- 
plishments. If ever, in the chronicle of any year, the life of some graduates might 
be written, it certainly would be a better measure of the value of the school than 
the statistics of an annual report. More and more the institution is coming under 
the influence of its graduates, whose accomplishments should be a guide to the 
educational policy of the school. The feeling of solidarity among our graduates has 
always been marked. Their life as pupils here has made more impression upon 
them than is usual among scholars from the elementary grades. 



52 P. D. 17 

The Alumni Association meeting held at the school in June was attended by 
nearly 150 members. Interest in the Association and its aims was still further 
stimulated by its dinner served at the annual meeting in November. To this 
meeting members came from all parts of the state. 

There are now at the school about twenty graduates from various classes. For 
these, there are a number of vocational paths open. The girls at the cottages have 
their excellent training, and every year a number find places as mother's helpers 
or in some form of domestic work. Our clerical class continues to send out each 
year some who succeed in finding office positions. Our sewing and handicraft 
classes give the girls training that fits them for many light industrial processes. 
Many of the boys take interest in the farm, with its work with animals and poultry, 
or for the mechanically-minded, with trucks and automobiles in the garage. The 
printing shop does more and better work each year. Through lack of a linotype, 
it cannot train for modern speed, but must make up in quality what it is forced to 
lack in quantity. Some boys do well in cobbling. One has reason to be proud of 
the fact that he has this year returned to the Trustees' Fund the small loan made 
him to set him up in a shoe-repairing business in his home town. One of our grad- 
uates has been taken into employment here as telephone operator, after a long and 
faithful training at the school switchboard as a volunteer worker. 

Repairs have been made as a regular routine and always with a view to perma- 
nency except at the old East Dormitory, the Nurses' Home and places where re- 
pairs would be expensive and inexpedient for other reasons. Another 14-car garage 
for cars of employees was built and at a rental charge of twenty-five cents per week 
returns a favorable rate of interest upon the investment; also a small detached 
building for calves was erected south-west of the cow barn. 

On the farm the herd of high-grade Guernsey cows produced 111,436 quarts of 
milk with an average butter fat content of 5.95% at an estimated cost of $.08536 per 
quart. 

From the poultry plant the institution was supplied with 8,6863^2 dozen eggs, 
2,86234 pounds of dressed fowl, 3,72834 pounds of dressed chicken and 165 pounds 
of broilers. 

Other important products of the farm were 2,747^ pounds of beef, 9,6103^ 
pounds of pork and a limited supply of both summer and winter vegetables. 

With an appropriation of $221,330, plus $7,635.14 brought forward from balance 
of 1935, the total amount available for maintenance was $228,965.14. Of this 
amount, $224,034.31 was expended. Of the amount expended, $145,510.61 was 
for salaries, wages and labor; $78,523.70 for all other expenses. Net weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, $16,568. Total receipts from all sources other than the 
State treasury, $84,575.64. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$139,458.67. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average 
number of inmates, 1 to 1.8. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH 

Charles A. DuBois, Superintendent 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools 
Benjamin F. Felt, Melrose, Chairman. 
John J. Mahoney, Watertown, V ice-Chairman. 
Frank L. Boyden, Deerfield. 
Dorothy Kirchwey Brown, Boston. 
Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 
Herbert B. Ehrmann, Brookline. 
James W. McDonald, Marlborough. 
Ruth Evans O'Keefe, Lynn. 
John J. Sheehan, Westborough. 
Walter C. Bell, 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Executive Secretary. 

[See also P. D. 93 — Annual Report of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools.] 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $1,088,378.97. 
Normal capacity of plant, 477. Value per unit of capacity, $2,281.71. 
Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent boys under fifteen 
years of age. Cottage plan. 



Pt. I. 



53 



Numbers 

Males 



Females 



Number December 1, 1935 . 
Admitted during year . 
Discharged during year 
Remaining November 30, 1936 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year . 
Smallest census during year . 



351 

727 

731 

347 

592 

345.59 

102.34 

381 

303 



44.91 



Total 
351 
727 
731 
347 
592 

345.59 
147 
381 
303 



25 



Of the 727 cases received during the year, 223 were committed by courts, listed 
as follows: assault and battery, 3; breaking and entering, 88; delinquent, 4; indecent 
exposure, 1; larceny, 81; lewdness, 2; malicious injury to property, 3; receiving 
stolen property, 1; running away, 9; setting fires, 2; sodomy, 1; stubbornness, 18; 
torturing animals, 1 ; unlawful appropriation of automobile, 9. 

Of the above, 194 had been arrested before and 26 had been inmates of other 
institutions. Eighty-nine (89), or 46.7 per cent, were of American parentage; 
84, or 47.1 per cent, were foreign born, and the parentage of 10 was unknown. 
Six (6) of the boys were foreign born, and 214 were born in the United States. In 
addition to the court commitments, 369 were returned from parole; 92 runaways 
captured; 26 returned from hospitals; 5 returned from visit home; 7 returned from 
funerals; 4 returned from court; 1 returned from leave of absence. 

Of the new commitments this year, 40 boys were eleven years of age or under. 
These young boys are taken care of in two cottages, one seven miles and the other 
three miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the older boys. 

Of the 731 cases discharged or released during the year, 371 wer released on 
parole to parents and relatives; released on parole to others than relatives, 54; 
released to Boston Psychopathic Hospital, 1; committed to Massachusetts Re- 
formatory, 1; leave of absence, 1; boarded out, 131; runaway, 97; released to hos- 
pitals, 31; transferred to other institutions, 22; released to funerals, 7; released to 
visit home, 6; released to court on habeas, 6; discharged as unfit subject, 1; com- 
mitted to State Hospital, 1; committed to Department for Defective Delinquents 
at Bridgewater, 1. 

It is believed to be important, when the boy first arrives at the school, to place 
him in a group of newly committed boys and to provide him an active program, 
in order that he may have less time to think about his misfortunes and become too 
homesick. A program of working about the grounds and in the various buildings con- 
nected with the farm and maintenance activities of the school, and in active recreat- 
ional pursuits, keeps the boy active, and provides opportunities for studying his atti- 
tudes towards work, play, masters and other boys. Some of these attitudes 
may be the key to his failure to adjust more satisfactorily in the community. 
This program is desirable also from the standpoint of health in that it keeps 
the boy in the open air most of the day, thus developing his appetite and 
inducing physical fatigue which results in sound sleep. The health of the other 
boys of the school is better safeguarded against potential carriers of communicable 
diseases by this arrangement. Careful mental tests and physical examinations are 
also incorporated in the program for the first month of the boy's stay at the Lyman 
School. As a consequence, it is possible at the end of this period to outline a fairly 
accurate treatment program for the rest of the boy's period of training 

The treatment program consists of four major factors: — academic; occupational; 
home life; and xecreational activities. Each of these factors is very important, and 
each should receive careful supervision. Efforts have been made to see that the 
entire staff keeps ever in mind that the most important consideration is the develop- 
ment of wholesome mental attitudes and reactions. They are encouraged to be 
alert in detecting unwholesome attitudes and to bring such cases to the attention 
of the professional staff for study. The staff is constantly reminded that behavior 
is not as much a matter of intellect or outcome of rational judgment as it is a matter 
of the habits of response to instincts, impulses, appetites, or urges. 

In home training, efforts are made to fix habits of cleanliness, good manners, 



5+ P. D. 17 

respect for the rights of others, service and loyalty to the home group, and pride in 
his appearance and reputation. Throughout the entire program, health is recog- 
nized as a fundamental objective. 

The farm was unusually productive in its various departments, with the exception 
of the apple crop. The dairy produced 223,915 quarts of milk, which is 15,913 
quarts more than the previous year's production. Eight thousand ninety-nine 
(8,099) dozen of eggs were produced as against 3,709 dozen the previous year. 
The potato crop was a bumper one, the yield being 166,005 pounds, as against 
80,861 pounds the preceding year. Additions to the silos, a new brooder house, and 
a new spray rig have contributed much to efficient farm work. 

From an appropriation of $290,910, plus $6,023.95 brought forward from the 
balance of 1935, the total amount available for maintenance was $296,933.95. Of 
this amount, $276,705.29 was expended. Of the amount expended, $150,982.88 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $125,722.41. Net weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from main- 
tenance, $15,295. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$2,110.33. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $274,594.96. Ratio 
of daily average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 
1 to 2.3. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools 

[See also P. D. 93 — Annual Report of the Trustee of the Massachusetts Training Schools.] 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $829,860.96 
Normal capacity of plant, 334. Value per unit of capacity, $2,484.61. 
Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and under 
twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 

Numbers 

Males Females Total 



Number December 1, 1935 . 
Admitted during year . . 
Discharged during year 
Remaining November 30, 1936 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year . 
Smallest census during year . 



305 - 305 

449 - 449 

504 - 504 

250 250 

706 

263 263 

76 23 99 

309 - 309 

231 - 231 



The list of causes of admission in the 274 cases committed during the year was 
as follows: arson, 1; assault, 1; assault and battery, 3; assault to rape, 2; assault 
with dangerous weapon, 1; assault with intent to rob, 2; attempted breaking and 
entering, 1; attempted larceny, 3; being a runaway, 7; breaking and entering, 41; 
breaking and entering and larceny, 46; carrying revolver, 2; destroying personal 
property, 1; defacing building, 1; drunkenness, 2; eavesdropping, 1; failure on 
parole, 16; indecent assault, 2; larceny, 56; lewdness, 4; malicious mischief, 1; 
robbery, 1; stubborn, disobedient and delinquent, 30; unlawful appropriation of 
auto, 40; unnatural act, 1; violating auto laws, 5; wantonly injuring property, 2; 
unlawfully carrying dirk knife, 1. 

In addition to the above, 142 boys were returned from parole, 8 returned from 
leave of absence, 21 returned from hospitals, and 4 returned from court. Of the 
274 boys committed by the courts, 255 had been in court before, and 73 had been 
inmates of other institutions. Twelve (12), or 7.3 per cent of the 274 boys com- 
mitted were foreign born, and 261, or 95 per cent, were born in the United States. 
Eighty-four (84), or 30.6 per cent were of American parentage; 113, or 41.2 per cent, 
were of foreign-born parents; while the parentage of 12 was unknown. 

Of the 504 boys discharged or released during the year, 280 were paroled; returned 



Pt. I. 55 

cases re-paroled, 167; granted leave of absence, 8; transferred to Massachusetts 
Reformatory, 11; committed to Department for Defective Delinquents at Bridge- 
water, 1; taken to other institutions, not penal, 19; taken to court on habeas and 
held, 1; absent without leave, 5; taken to court on habeas and not returned, 10; 
discharged, 2. 

With a normal capacity of 334 the school carried an average of 263 during the 
year. Seven hundred six (706) boys were dealt with during the year and the length 
of stay in school of all boys paroled for the first time during the year was 9.5 months. 

Believing as always that individualization is a prime factor in any serious attempt 
to educate the delinquent boy, the school has continued to intensify its efforts with 
each lad as a separate problem. The added services of a full-time psychologist has 
made possible a more careful study of the boy and a more adequate presentation 
of the data for the consideration of the classification committee comprised of the 
superintendent, psychologist, supervising cottage master, and school principal who 
sit in conference to place the youth as wisely as possible in his academic, vocational 
and recreational life. 

Reducing to forty-eight the required hours of weekly employment for State em- 
ployees has made possible a regular series of cottage masters' meetings during which 
particular attention has been paid to cottage life as a distinct opportunity for social 
education. The development of house groups, making, as they do, for a healthy 
and keen communal interest, is evidence of the growing appreciation of the rich 
educational possibilities of group living in a twenty-four hour school. 

The work in the academic field has been gradually extended. Departmentali- 
zation, even on a small scale, has led to improved teaching of our units of work in 
the fields of English, general science, and social science. In the social science field 
the development of a wholesome attitude toward civic and family responsibility is 
the goal. 

The general science field is devoted to encouraging real thought about every-day 
factors in our environment that are likely to be taken for granted without any con- 
sideration. Units are devoted to the weather, water and its sources, automobile 
mechanics, and other similar topics. 

Vocationally the school continues to do an excellent job of teaching industry and 
the ability to do things. Some progress has been made toward organizing the edu- 
cational possibilities of the routine maintenance work into concrete learning units. 
It is planned to expend even greater effort this coming year in this most important 
field. 

The department of physical education has been strengthened, especially as con- 
cerns the use of the summer play ground. Noteworthy is the introduction of new 
games and the starting of new inter-cottage leagues. 

Representative athletic teams acquitted themselves very creditably in inter- 
scholastic competition. This feature of the program is not only of great value to 
the boys participating, but is a tremendous factor in developing proper group loyalty 
and group morale. 

During the year various improvements have been made in the physical plant, 
including the building of a septic tank, the laying of pipe for drainage, and improve- 
ment and re-surfacing of roads. The land purchased last year has made available 
additional land for pasturage and 250 cords of stove wood have been cut from it. 

The farm, in addition to offering a splendid chance to teach the boy a knowledge 
of agricultural processes, has again paid well for the money and labor involved. 
Some of the larger items produced were 2,125 bushels of potatoes, 1,700 baskets of 
peaches, 192,000 quarts of milk, 10,500 dozen of eggs, and 11,720 pounds of poultry. 
The canning department did exceedingly well this year. Some of the more im- 
portant items were 6,525 quarts of tomatoes, 3,925 quarts of corn, 3,654 quarts of 
string beans, and 1,987 quarts of apple sauce. All of this food, together with some 
three thousand dollars' worth of miscellaneous fruit and vegetables, is consumed 
in the institution, and goes far toward insuring an adequate and palatable diet for 
growing boys. 

With an appropriation of $200,195 plus $613.18 brought forward from balance 
of 1935, the amount available for maintenance was $200,808.18. Of this amount, 
$185,543.08 was expended. Of the amount expended, $100,070.88 was for salaries, 
wages and labor; all other expenses, $85,472.20. Net weekly per capita cost of 



Numbers 






Males 


Females 


Total 


. 


257 


257 




- 


211 


211 




- 


234 


234 




- 


234 


234 




- 


441 


441 




- 


265.89 


265.89 


r 


25 


65 


90 




- 


287 


287 




- 


234 


234 



56 P. D. 17 

maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, 
$13,498. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $1,558.77. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $183,984.31. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 2.6. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER 

Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools 

[See also P. D. 93 — Annual Report of the Trustees of the Massach u setts Training Schools.] 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $662,869.72. 
Normal capacity of plant, 303. Value per unit of capacity, $2,187.68. 
Founded in 1854 as a private institution. Taken over by the State in 1856. 
Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under seventeen 
years of age at time of commitment. 



Number December 1, 1935 . 
Admitted during year . 
Discharged during year 
Remaining November 30, 1936 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year . 
Smallest census during year . 

The list of causes of admission for 115 commitments of the 211 cases received at 
the school during the year is as follows: carrying a dangerous weapon, 1; delin- 
quency, 4; delinquent child — lewdness, 1; delinquent child — lewd, wanton and 
lascivious person in speech and behavior, 1 ; delinquent — intoxicated, 1 ; delinquent 
— larceny, 1; delinquent — lewd and lascivious cohabitation, 2; delinquent — runa- 
away, 4; delinquent — stubbornness, 3; false alarm of fire, 1; fornication, 7; larceny, 
14; larceny of auto, 1; lewdness, 8; lewd person, 1; lewd and lascivious cohabitation, 
1; lewd and wanton person in behavior, 2; lewd, wanton and lascivious person in 
speech and behavior, 3; lewd, wanton and lascivious person in behavior, 4; runaway, 
11; running away from home, 1; stubborn child, 23; stubbornness, 9; stubborn and 
disobedient child, 2; stubbornness — fornication, 1; transfer from Division of Child 
Guardianship, 8 (delinquent, 2; runaway, 3; stubbornness, 3). 

Of the above, 56, or 48 per cent, were of American parentage; 31, or 27 per cent 
were of foreign parentage. 

Recalled to the school, 26; from leave of absence, 7; from absence without leave, 
1; from hospitals, 18. Returned from parole: for a visit, 3; for medical care, 18; for 
further training, 14; for violation of parole, 27; to await transfer or commitment to 
other institutions, 8. 

The average length of stay in school of all girls was 1 year, 6 months and 15 days. 

Of the 234 girls released from the school during the year, 89 were released on 
parole to parents or relatives; on parole to parents to attend school, 15; on parole 
to other families for wages, 83; on parole to other families to attend schools, 5; 
from a visit to Industrial School, 3; leave of absence, 7; absence without leave, 1; 
transferred to hospitals, 22; committed to Department for Female Defective De- 
linquents, 1; committed to State Hospitals, 4; to be committed to Schools for 
Feeble-minded, 4. 

Physical examinations at the hospital are given to each individual on her entrance 
to the School. The principles of care and improvement of the body are stressed at 
the receiving cottage, following transfer from the hospital, and these principles are 
continued at a training cottage. Close association with staff members and house 
mothers, chapel and school assemblies and religious instruction emphasize character 
training and furnish spiritual help and guidance to the girls. Wholesome living 



Pt. I 57 

conditions at the School, regular hours for work and recreation, a definite program 
of industrial and academic activities, in addition to the responsibility given to each 
girl to accomplish successfully the tasks assigned — all contribute to self-reliance 
and character building helpful to the girl. 

In the educational department the School is fortunate in having a central school 
building, which offers excellent facilities for a well rounded program, affording each 
child the opportunities which seem best for her development. 

Attendance at school is, at the Industrial School, something desirable and a 
privilege to be enjoyed. As this is quite contrary to the general feeling of the 
average girl on entrance to the institution, an effort is made to bring about this 
attitude by having comfortable and attractive surroundings in the class room, by 
placement in classes where the individual works within the limits of her own ability, 
by the vitalizing of lessons presented, and an understanding attitude on the part of 
the teachers. 

All girls attend academic school at least a portion of each day, and the younger 
girls receive extra time. All grades from the third are represented and three years 
of high school work are offered. In grades below the seventh, marked retardation 
is noted. At the present time a particularly large number is enrolled in these 
classes. Many have English difficulties,' besides being handicapped with a poor 
mental equipment. 

The domestic science class continued its basic program of enrolling new girls as 
soon as possible and, in addition, gave girls of lower mentality a longer period of 
training and individual attention. Classes were held twice a week. 

Homemaking continued to be a part of the seventh grade program and was in 
charge of the teacher of this department. 

The physical education department provided gymnastic exercises twice a week, 
and, in addition, took charge of recreational work evenings and on Saturday after- 
noons. Tournaments in volley ball and basket ball were held and much enthusiasm 
displayed. 

The sewing course in the institution is well organized, from the model work in 
the receiving cottage, through the various steps to the dressmaking department, 
where a variety of attractive dresses are made, both for wear in the School and for 
parole use. The craft work has been largely rug making, chair caning, and basketry. 
Various types of rugs have been made, such as braided, hooked, and braidweave. 

Nature study, under an enthusiastic teacher, has been popular, with nature walks 
a regular part of the program, and an older group has been interested in class room 
work. 

The social part of the school program is not neglected. Assemblies are held 
Fridays and offer a splendid opportunity for the girls to develop poise and initiative. 
Here, too, proper attitudes are formed and worth while things learned. Holidays 
bring special observance in keeping with the spirit of the day. 

The music department plays a very definite part in our educational program. 
The supervisor of music gave class instruction and general chorus work to the entire 
group, and also held separate music rehearsals for Sunday services. In addition, 
a choir group of about thirty girls contributed largely to the pageants given at 
Christmas, Easter and in June, with a group of little girls included. 

The library has been as popular as ever. Many excellent books have been re- 
ceived from the National Civic Federation of Women's Clubs as well as those pur- 
chased with School funds. A library of approximately 2,700 books is now available. 
Reading certificates issued by the State Department of Public Libraries have been 
given to a number of girls. The year has brought good response from the girls and 
much work has been accomplished. 

Production on the farm was about normal. Potatoes and vegetables were har- 
vested covering the requirements for the institution; hay, ensilage and green feed 
were supplied for farm consumption. Beef, pork, chicken and butter were sent to 
the Store House; 114,700 quarts of milk and 4,900 dozen eggs were produced. 

A surplus production of potatoes, salt pork and hay was sold through the State 
Purchasing Bureau to other institutions. 

From an appropriation of $161,750 plus a total of $2,003.12 brought forward 
from balance of 1935, the amount available for maintenance was $163,753.12. Of 
this amount $158,408.34 was expended. Of the amount expended $81,441.36 was 



58 P. D. 17 

for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $76,966.98. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, 
$11,333. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $1,821.42. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $156,586.92. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 2.9. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS 

In the matter of financial supervision, the Department examines and analyzes 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the institution 
and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of the inmates. 
The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condition of each 
institution. 

Capacity, Population and Inventory 

Table I gives in brief a statistical representation of the size and value of the five 
institutions under the supervision of the Department. Part I deals with the 
number of persons served by the institutions. Part II deals with the value of the 
property. 

Table II is designed to show every item of income to each institution, from what- 
ever source, for whatever purpose, excepting certain private funds, casting all to- 
gether for ready comparison. According to this table the total receipts from all 
sources were $2,548,918.42. Of this amount, $2,292,902.67 was received from the 
State treasury, and the remainder, $256,015.75, came in on account of the insti- 
tution, through board of patients, sale of products or otherwise. 

Table III, divided into three parts, shows all expenditures of whatever nature 
on account of the several institutions. Part I deals with maintenance only. Part 
II exhibits outlays for special purposes, divided into four headings, namely, "land," 
"buildings," "furnishing and equipping," and "miscellaneous." Part III sum- 
marizes Parts I and II, and adds thereto the amounts expended from trust funds 
held by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth. 

The table shows that $2,110,882.81 was spent for maintenance, exclusive of 
expenditures for special purposes mentioned in Part II, which amounted to 
$180,022.60. 

In addition to the expenditures as above indicated, wo institutions — Lyman 
School for Boys and Industrial School for Girls — have private trust funds which 
are administered for the benefit of inmates, but independently of the State's in- 
vestment. The custody of each is vested in the State Treasurer, whose duty it is 
to invest the same and pay therefrom at the request of the trustees. Three of 
these trust funds — The Lyman Fund, the Lyman Trust Fund and the Lamb Fund 
— apply to Lyman School for Boys, while the Fay Fund, the Mary Lamb Fund and 
the Rogers Book Fund pertain to the Industrial School for Girls. From these 
sources a total of $1,997.26 was expended during the year. By adding to the 
amounts given for trust funds ($1,997.26) as shown in Part III, we find a grand 
total of $2,292,902.67 expended on account of the five institutions. 

Table IV shows for each of the five institutions the total cost of maintenance. 
It further shows all receipts from sales or refunds; the difference, which is the net 
cost to the institutions; and the average net weekly per capita cost to the insti- 
tution, with a column showing the corresponding per capita for the three-year 
period just ended. 

Table V shows the daily average number employed in 1935 and 1936, with the 
same average for the three-year period ending November, 1935. The same treat- 
ment is given the average monthly compensation and the weekly per capita cost. 
The total average number employed was 1,136.58, while for the three-year period 
preceding 1936 it was 912.56 and 947.57 in 1935. The total average monthly 
compensation paid was $408.00, as against $387.72 in the preceding three-year 
period, and $400.16 in 1935. Miscellaneous and incidental employment not entered 
upon the payrolls of the institutions does not appear on this tabulation. 



Pt. I 



59 



Table I — Part L- 



-Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for the 
Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1936 



INSTITUTIONS 


Normal 
Capacity 


Present Any 
One Time 


Daily A 
Present 


vehage Number 
during the year 




Largest 
Number 


Smallest 
Number 


1936 


1935 


1934 


State Infirmary 

Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 


3,150 
331 
477 
334 
303 


3,205 
293 
381 
309 

287 


2,707 
139 
303 
231 
234 


2,977 
259 
345 
263 
266 


2,904 
271 
397 
317 
274 


2,965 
273 
399 
335 
258 


Totals .... 


4,595 


4,475 


3,614 


4,110 


4,163 


4,230 



Table I. — Part II. — Inventory of the Five Institutions 





Real and Personal Estate 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Personal Total 




Acres Value 


Buildings Property Value 


State Infirmary. 

Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Lyman School for Boys . , 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 


916.00 $84,579 94 
165.72 41,806 00 
579.13 57,525 57 
968.04 35,629 80 
368.80 22,680 00 


$3,226,435 33 

768,524 39 120,362 63 930,693 02 
854,623 36 176,230 04 1,088,378 97 
645,405 00 148,826 16 829,860 96 
516,875 82 123,313 90 662,869 72 


Totals .... 


2,997.69 $242,221 31 


$6,011,863 90 



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Pt. I. 



61 



Table III. — Part II. — Expenditures of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 80, 1936 — Continued 





For Special Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Furnish- 
Land Buildings ing and 
Equipping 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Total 


State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


$156,841 59 $393 82 
723 52 

4,465 17 


$17,198 38 
400 12 


$174,433 79 

723 52 

400 12 

4,465 17 


Totals .... 


$161,306 76 $1,117 34 


$17,598 50 


$180,022 60 


Table III. — Part III. 


— Summary of Expenditures for 
November 30, 1936— Concluded 


the Fiscal 


Year ending 


INSTITUTIONS 

State Infirmary 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 


Special 
Maintenance Purposes 

$1,266,191 79 $174,433 79 
224,034 31 723 52 
276,705 29 400 12 
185,543 08 4,465 17 
158,408 34 


Trust 
Funds 

$1,886 52 
110 74 


Total 

$1,440,625 58 
224,757 83 
278,991 93 
190,008 25 
158,519 08 


Totals .... 


$2,110,882 81 $180,022 60 


$1,997 26 


$2,292,902 67 



62 



P.D. 17 



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Pt. I. 



63 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the four county 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the visita- 
tion of this Department, which is required to report thereon in its annual report. 
The names of the schools and the Superintendents are as follows : 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence, James R. Tetler 

Hampden County Ti aining School, Springfield (Feeding Hills), Chris L. Berninger 

Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford, J. Earl Wolton 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston), Colonel Edgar C. Erickson 

Table I shows the trend of the population in the County Training Schools during 
the past five years. 

Table I — County Training Schools — Average Number in Schools during the Years 

1932-1936 



Essex County Training School 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Worcester County Training School 

Totals .... 



1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


85.0 


80.0 


88.0 


88.5 


95.0 


23.6 


17.9 


34.0 


27.0 


32.0 


83.0 


88.0 


110.0 


138.0 


140.0 


24.0 


26.0 


30.0 


29.0 


32.0 



215.6 



211.9 



262.0 



282.5 



299.0 



Table II shows the numbers and the movement of the population in these insti- 
tutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1936, and also the average weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, $11.80, subtracting all receipts from private sources. 

As will be seen from Table II there were 449 children in the four schools during 
1936. The year opened with 305. In the succeeding twelve months 144 were 
admitted and 167 were discharged, leaving 282. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was 13 years, 
6 months, 16 days. Every child must be discharged, by requirements of the statute, 
upon reaching the age of sixteen. 

Table II. — County Training Schools — Number and Movement of Population 





Number in School during the Year 


Main- 


School 


Whole 
Number 


On 

Jan. 1, 

1936 


Admitted 


Released 
or Dis- 
charged 


Remain 

ing on 

Dec. 31, 

1936 


tenance 

of Schools 

(Average 

Weekly 

per Capita 

Cost) 


Essex County Training School 
Hampden County Training School 
Middlesex County Training School 
Worcester County Training School 


136 
51 

213 
49 


102 
30 

142 
31 


34 
21 
71 
18 


53 
17 
79 
18 


83 

34 

134 

31 


$7 81 
15 75 
10 75 
12 90 


Totals .... 


449 


305 


144 


167 


282 


11 80 



LICENSED BOARDING HOMES FOR AGED PERSONS 

Francis Bardwell, Supervisor 

Under General Laws, chapter 121, section 22A, inserted by Acts of 1929, chapter 
305, providing that "whoever maintains a home in which three or more persons 
over the age of sixty years, and not members of his immediate family are provided 
with care, incident to advanced age, shall be deemed to maintain a boarding home 
for aged persons," this Department is delegated to issue licenses and to make, alter 
and amend rules and regulations for the government of such homes. 

During the past year the Department has received 91 applications for licenses; 
79 of these were granted after investigation; 109 licenses were renewed; and 49 
were cancelled. Two (2) licenses were revoked because of neglect and improper 
treatment of the inmates. At the present time there are 335 licenses in force in 102 
cities and towns. 

In several homes it has been necessary to issue orders to remove locks from doors 
to patients' rooms; also to have aged people removed from rooms on the third floor. 



64 



P.D. 17 



Mental patients were removed from 4 homes and sent to hospitals equipped to give 
them the proper care. 

This j^ear many of the private social agencies, as well as the public ones, have 
become interested in the problem of taking care of aged people. About one-third 
of the inmates in the licensed homes are supported by public welfare, either in the 
form of old age assistance or, when they are not eligible for this aid, by ordinary 
public welfare. The problem of caring properly for bedridden patients receiving 
from $5 to $8 a week is a large one. The Department has considerable difficulty 
in maintaining proper standards in those homes willing to accept such prices. It is 
felt that $8 a week is the least one can expect for board and nursing care. Existing 
economic conditions have forced many of the homes to take people for $5 a week, 
which is not sufficient compensation for the labor and supplies involved in caring 
for sick people. It is with great satisfaction that the Department looks on the 
efforts of these other agencies who are willing to co-operate in improving the con- 
dition of our aged indigent. 

The Old Age Assistance Bureau has arranged that in the towns where there are 
no licensed boarding homes the old age assistance is paid directly to the applicant, 
who finds a place to live in a licensed boarding home in a neighboring town. This 
eliminates the necessity of the applicant for old age assistance transferring from 
one town to another. It is done only in cases where nursing care is required. 

During the past year the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Welfare 
has adopted a policy by which all homes licensed under this section are required 
to keep a register that will give all information needed in regard to all inmates in 
these homes. This register has been found to be helpful to the nurses operating 
the homes, as well as to the visitors and the inspector of the Department. 

This Department keeps an index of homes by locality and prices for the benefit 
of those desiring to find a home, but it does not place people in homes directly, or 
take any interest in finding patients for homes. The uniform regulations for all 
homes are that they shall be kept clean, provide wholesome and adequate food and 
give kindly care. No home is licensed without the approval of the local building 
inspector, and no application is considered until three references from physicians 
have been received, stating that the applicant is capable of conducting such a home. 

During the past year 839 visits were made to boarding homes for aged persons. 



SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED 

BY CITIES AND TOWNS 
General Laws, chapter 117, section 3, and chapter 121, sections 7 and 16, 
provide that the Department of Public Welfare may visit and inspect all places 
where city or town poor are supported in families, and require the Department 
to visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are maintained by the Com- 
monwealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense of any city 
or town. Children illegally retained in city or town infirmaries must be removed 
therefrom and placed at board at the expense of the city or town concerned. 

The Settled Adult Poor Provided for in Families 
Of the 556 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully supported in 
families on January 1, 1936, 27 had died, and 84 had been removed before visits 
were made. The remaining 445 — 256 men and 189women — were all visited and 
reported on by the Department's agents. They were supported by 140 cities and 
towns as follows: 

Easthampton, 7 
Enfield, 1 
Everett, 2 
Foxborough, 6 
Franklin, 2 
Goshen, 1 
Grafton, 1 
Granville, 2 
Great Barrington, 10 
Groton, 2 
Groveland, 2 
Halifax, 1 
Hampden, 1 
Hancock, 3 
Hanson, 1 



Abington, 2 


Bourne, 1 


Concord, 1 


Acushnet, 2 


Boxford, 1 


Conway, 1 


Agawam, 4 


Braintree, 2 


Cummington, 1 


Andover, 1 


Brewster, 1 


Dalton, 12 


Arlington, 17 


Bridgewater, 2 


Danvers, 10 


Ashby, 1 


Brookline, 10 


Dedham, 3 


Ashland, 5 


Buckland, 5 


Deerfield, 4 


Athol, 3 


Charlemont, 1 


Dennis, 4 


Attleboro, 3 


Chatham, 2 


Dighton, 3 


Auburn, 3 


Chelsea, 3 


Douglas, 2 


Bedford, 2 


Cheshire, 3 


Dover, 1 


Bellingham, 3 


Chicopee, 6 


Dudley, 1 


Beverly, 1 


Clinton, 4 


Duxbury, 1 


Blackstone, 1 


Cohasset, 4 


East Bridgewater, 4 


Blandford, 1 


Colrain, 4 


East Brookfield, 1 



Pt. I. 



65 



Haverhill, 2 
Heath, 3 
Holden, 1 
Hopedale.,1 
Hopkinton, 5 
Hudson, 1 
Huntington, 3 
Kingston, 3 
Lakeville, 1 
Lancaster, 1 
Lanesborough, 3 
Leicester, 2 
Leominster, 2 
Lexington, 5 
Ley den, 2 
Lunenburg, 3 
Maiden, 3 
Mattapoisett, 3 
Maynard, 4 
Medfield, 1 



Medway, 1 
Melrose, 13 
Middleborough, 10 
Millbury, 7 
Milton, 1 
Monson, 5 
Montague, 1 
Natick, 3 
Needham, 1 
Newburyport, 4 
New Marlborough, 1 
New Salem, 2 
Northborough, 4 
Northfield, 6 
Norfolk, 1 
Norton, 5 
Norwell, 2 
Norwood, 12 
Orange, 5 
Palmer, 1 



Petersham, 1 
Phillipston, 3 
Pittsfield, 7 
Plainville, 1 
Plymouth, 2 
Princeton, 2 
Quincy, 4 
Reading, 4 
Rowe, 1 
Raynham, 1 
Russell, 3 
Sheffield, 3 
Sherborn, 2 
Shirley, 2 
Shrewsbury, 2 
Southwick, 5 
Springfield, 3 
Stockbridge, 1 
Stoneham, 3 
Stoughton, 1 



Stow, 4 
Sutton, 1 
Swampscott, 1 
Templeton, 4 
Tewksbury, 2 
Topsfield, 1 
Tyngsborough, 1 
Wareham, 1 
Washington, 1 
Watertown, 13 
Westborough, 2 
West Boylston, 1 
Weston, 1 
West Springfield, 
Westwood, 1 
Weymouth, 5 
Whitman, 12 
Williamstown, 1 
Winchendon, 1 
Winthrop, 2 



16 



Their ages were as follows: 8 between 21 and 30; 13 between 30 and 40; 33 be- 
tween 40 and 50; 71 between 50 and 60; 151 between 60 and 70; 104 between 70 
and 80; 55 between 80 and 90; 10 between 90 and 100. 

For their support there was paid in 2 cases less than $2; in 27 cases from $2 to $3; 
in 77 cases from $3 to $4; in 339 cases — mostly of old and feeble persons — the rate 
varied from $4 to $15 per week according to the amount of care required. 

Of the whole number 216 were reported to be in good or fairly good physical con- 
dition, and 395 in good or fairly good mental condition. In all but 7 cases they 
were apparently receiving good care — these latter were referred to the Boards of 
Public Welfare. There were 83 able to do light work either in the house or about 
the premises. In 219 cases, according to the reports the members of the local board 
of public welfare complied with the law requiring them to visit these persons at 
least once in every six months; in 84 cases they were visited once during the year; 
in 112 cases they were not visited at all. 



Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for Outside 

Infirmaries 

As shown by the department's visitation of the 2,174 children reported by the 
authorities as fully supported outside the infirmaries on January 1, 1936, and July 1, 
1936, 200 had been removed before visits could be made, 2 had died, and 48 were 
supporting themselves. The remaining 1,924 — 1,030 boys and 894 girls — were 
supported by 124 cities and towns as follows: 



Acushnet, 2 
Agawam, 2 
Amherst, 4 
Andover, 4 
Ashburnham, 2 
Athol, 4 
Barnstable, 12 
Bellingham, 1 
Beverly, 11 
Billerica, 6 
Blackstone, 2 
Boston, 968 
Braintree, 4 
Bridgewater, 5 
Brockton, 9 
Brookline, 9 
Buckland, 1 
Cambridge, 11 
Canton, 1 
Charlton, 5 
Chelmsford, 3 
Chelsea, 4 
Chester, 4 
Chicopee, 14 
Clinton, 6 
Conway, 3 
Danvers, 1 
Dartmouth, 1 
Dedham, 2 
Deerfield, 4 
Dennis, 2 



Dighton, 1 
Douglas, 3 
Dracut, 7 

East Bridgewater, 3 
East Longmeadow, 3 
Easthampton, 2 
Easton, 2 
Everett, 2 
Fairhaven, 12 
Falmouth, 16 
Fitchburg, 11 
Foxborough, 2 
Framingham, 7 
Gardner, 13 
Gill, 4 
Grafton, 1 
Greenfield, 3 
Hanover, 1 
Holyoke, 9 
Hopedale, 1 
Hopkinton, 1 
Lancaster, 3 
Lawrence, 19 
Leicester, 3 
Leominster, 19 
Lincoln, 3 
Ludlow, 4 
Lunenburg, 5 
Lynn, 39 
Maiden, 15 
Maynard, 2 



Medford, 5 
Melrose, 6 
Methuen, 7 
Middleborough, 12 
Milford, 7 
Millbury, 2 
Milton, 1 
Monson, 1 
Montague, 4 
Nantucket, 4 
Natick, 4 
Needham, 3 
New Bedford, 71 
Newburyport, 4 
Newton, 15 
North Attleborough, 2 
North Brookfield, 2 
Northborough, 4 
Northfield, 6 
Norton, 1 
Norwell, 1 
Norwood, 3 
Oak Bluffs, 1 
Palmer, 1 
Peabody, 9 
Pepperell, 6 
Pittsfield, 11 
Plainville, 2 
Plymouth, 2 
Princeton, 2 
Quincy, 7 



Reading, 2 
Rochester, 4 
Rockland, 5 
Rowe, 1 
Rowley, 1 
Salem, 25 
Shirley, 4 
Somerset, 2 
Somerville, 20 
South Hadley, 1 
Southborough, 1 
Southbridge, 1 
Springfield, 22 
Stoneham, 10 
Stoughton, 2 
Taunton, 18 
Tewksbury, 3 
Wareham, 8 
Watertown, 2 
Webster, 12 
Wellesley, 8 
West Brookfield, 1 
West Springfield, 6 
Westfield, 2 
Westport, 6 
Weymouth, 10 
Whitman, 5 
Wilbraham, 2 
Winchendon, 10 
Windsor, 1 
Worcester, 200 



Of the whole number 140 were cared for and treated in hospitals and institutions. 
There were 1,505 who attended school, and 210 who did more or less work about 



66 P.D. 17 

the house. Of the whole number 1,835 were in good or fairly good physical con- 
dition, and 1,856 in good or fairly good mental condition. The price of board varies 
from $1.25 to $8 per week. These children were found to be well cared for with a 
few exceptions, which have been brought to the attention of the local board of 
public welfare. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement Provided for in 

Infirmaries 
Visits were made to 86 children — 37 boys and 49 girls — reported to be cared for 
by the following cities and towns in their infirmaries: 

Springfield, 3 
Sturbridge, 1 
Worcester, 1 



Amesbury, 2 


Falmouth, 1 


Lowell, 5 


Boston, 46 


Fitchburg, 1 


Lynn, 2 


Cambridge, 1 


Haverhill, 1 


Maiden, 1 


Dedham, 1 


Holyoke, 3 


Middleborough, 2 


Fall River, 13 


Lawrence, 1 


Milford, 1 



Of the number visited, 45 were so defective in either mind or body as to make 
their retention in an infirmary desirable. 

The Penalty Incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for Failure to Make 
their returns of poor relief during the month of april, 1936 
Under sections 32-35 of chapter 117 of the General Laws, the Department re- 
ported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns 
which failed to make their returns of poor relief during the month of April, 1936, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows: Abington 
$1; Agawam, $11; Avon, $11; Bernardston, $4; Billerica, $1; Burlington, $10 
Chilmark, $17; Clarksburg, $57; Douglas, $8; Dover, $11; Florida, $1; Freetown 
$342; Gay Head, $12; Gill, $24; Halifax, $17; Hopkinton, $13; Leverett, $11 
Marion, $3; Nahant, $1; New Braintree, $10; North Adams, $3; North Reading 
$50; Peabody, $12; Princeton, $157; Rochester, $13; Russell, $3; Salisbury, $1 
Shelburne, $1; Swansea, $61; Tisbury, $17; Topsfield, $10; West Newbury, $1 
Westminster, $24; Westwood, $77; Weymouth, $10; Worcester, $410 (1935 and 
1936); Worthington, $11. Total, $1,426. 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION 

The Commissioner of Public Welfare made five recommendations for legislation 
this year. These recommendations were forwarded to the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth on December 2, 1936, in accordance with the provisions of section 33 
of chapter 30 of the General Laws. The recommendations were as follows: 

I. Relative to the Acquisition and Maintenance of a Legal Settlement 
Persons attending out-patient departments of hospitals, clinics or dispensaries, 
who are unable to pay for the service received, do not generally realize that the 
service is in some instances construed as a type of aid or assistance that will prevent 
the acquisition of a legal settlement. If it were understoood that the receipt of 
such service does take away certain rights of individuals, it would, in my opinion, 
defeat the purposes for which these services were established. I therefore recom- 
mend that this provision of law be amended so as to provide that such service does 
not prevent the acquisition of a legal settlement. 

II. Relative to the Powers and Duties of Boards of Public Welfare 
Under existing law the local boards of public welfare have the power to require 
that dependent persons who have a legal settlement in the town granting the as- 
sistance should give service for the aid received. In order that the local boards 
of public welfare may have authority to require service from all dependent persons, 
regardless of their legal settlement status, I recommend that the word "such/' 
which refers only to persons having legal settlement in the town granting the aid, 
should be stricken from the law. 

III. Relative to Liability to a Town for Support 
Under existing law the town of legal settlement is required to take the action 
in a case of liability for support. If a person receiving aid in a town in the eastern 



Pt. I. 67 

part of the State has a legal settlement in a town in the extreme western part of 
the State, it makes it very difficult for the town of legal settlement to take the action 
required. The board of public welfare of the town granting the aid is also in a 
position to have more detailed information in relation to the case. I therefore 
recommend that this provision of law be so amended as to provide that the town 
granting the aid shall have the authority to take action under the law in relation 
to all persons aided, regardless of thier legal settlement status. 

IV. Relative to Medical Attendance Fuknished to Needy Persons 
Under existing law there are local boards of public welfare which contract for 
the services of a town physician exclusively for dependent persons who have legal 
settlement in the town granting the aid. In the execution of such contracts there 
would seem to be no valid reason why the town physician's services should not 
include persons having no legal settlement or persons having legal settlement in 
other cities and towns. This recommendation for amendment of the law is sub- 
mitted for the purpose of preventing such an inequitable basis of contract. 

V. Further amending the Old Age Assistance Law, So Called 
When the Old Age Assistance Law was amended by the Legislature of 1936, in 
order to bring the law into conformity with the Federal Social Security Act, the 
minimum amount of assistance to be granted to a married couple was set at not 
less than $50 a month for both, whereas the minimum amount to be granted to 
two brothers or two sisters or a brother and sister living together was set at $45 a 
month. In my opinion there is no valid reason why the brothers and sisters should 
receive less assistance than a married couple, and I therefore recommend that the 
amount of assistance to be granted to brothers and sisters should be increased from 
$45 to $50 a month. 

It would appear from the wording of the Old Age Assistance Law that an appli- 
cant for old age assistance who has owned real estate for only four years preceding 
his application for assistance would not be required to comply with the provision 
of the law requiring the execution of a bond and mortgage for the amount of equity 
in excess of $2,000, whereas an applicant who has owned real estate for five years 
or more is required to execute such bond and mortgage. This would appear to be 
an inequitable requirement of the law, which I recommend should be repealed. 

LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT PASSED BY 
LEGISLATURE OF 1936 

Chap. 59. — Resolve Providing for an Investigation by a Special Commission 
Relative to Certain Problems Arising from the Acquisition or Owner- 
ship of Property in a Municipality by the Commonwealth or a Political 
Subdivision Thereof. 

Resolved, That an unpaid special commission, to consist of the commissioners of 
corporations and taxation, correction, conservation, education, public health, 
mental diseases and public welfare, is hereby established for the purpose of investi- 
gating the advisability of revising the laws relative to the reimbursement of muni- 
cipalities for loss of taxes by reason of lands therein owned by the commonwealth 
or a political subdivision thereof or changing the established practice of aiding 
municipalities in which the commonwealth or any of its political subdivisions ac- 
quire property for any purpose. In making said investigation the commission 
shall consider the subject matter of current house documents numbered three 
hundred and seventy-two, fifteen hundred and seventy and seventeen hundred and 
ninety-nine and may consider any or all problems or matters in any way germane 
to the subject of said investigation. Any of said commissioners may, if he so elects, 
designate an officer or employee in his department who shall serve in his place on 
said commission. Said commission shall report to the general court the results of 
its investigation, and its recommendations, if any, together with drafts of legislation 
necessary to carry such recommendations into effect, by filing the same with the 
clerk of the house of representatives on or before the first Wednesday of December 
in the current year. — (Approved June 19, 1936.) 



68 P.D. 17 

Chap. 108. — An Act Exempting Grandpakents and Grandchildren of Certain 
Poor Persons from Liability for their Support. 
Chapter one hundred and seventeen of the General Laws is hereby amended by 
striking out section six, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, and inserting 
in place thereof the following: — Section 6. The kindred of such poor persons, in 
the line or degree of father, mother and children, by consanguinity, living in the 
commonwealth, and of sufficient ability, shall be bound to support such poor 
persons in proportion to their respective ability. — (Approved March 5, 1936.) 

Chap. 295. — An Act Relative to Patients' Funds at the State Infirmary 

and the Disposition of Unclaimed Property and Moneys Represented 

by Bank Books Belonging to Former Patients. 

Chapter one hundred and twenty-two of the General Laws is hereby amended 
by inserting after section two A, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, the 
following four new sections: — Section 2B. The superintendent of the state in- 
firmary may deposit in any bank or trust company within the commonwealth 
funds belonging to patients and funds deposited by their relatives or friends to be 
used for their benefit, in an account entitled "Patients' Funds". 

Section 2C. So much of any funds known as "Patients' Funds" as represents 
monies belonging to, or deposited for the benefit of, former patients of the state 
infirmary, which shall have remained unclaimed for more than seven years, shall 
be paid by the superintendent of said state infirmary to the state treasurer to be 
held subject to be paid to the person establishing a lawful right thereto, with interest 
at the rate of three per cent per annum from the time when it was so paid to the 
state treasurer to the time when it is paid by him to such person; provided, that so 
much of any monies so paid to the state treasurer as may be necessary to reimburse 
the trustees of the state infirmary for any sum due for the support of the person by 
whom or for whose benefit such money was originally deposited shall be credited 
to said trustees for that purpose. After six years from the date when any such 
monies were paid to the state treasurer the same or any balance thereof then re- 
maining in his hands may be used as a part of the ordinary revenue of the common- 
wealth. Any person may, however, establish his claim after the expiration of the 
six years above mentioned, and any claim so established shall be paid from the 
ordinary revenue of the commonwealth. Any person claiming a right to money 
deposited with the state treasurer under this section may establish the same by a 
petition to the probate court; provided, that in cases where claims amount to less 
than fifty dollars, the claims may be presented to the comptroller who shall ex- 
amine the same and allow and certify for payment such as may be proved to his 
satisfaction. 

Section 2D. Property known as "Patients' Valuables", belonging to, or deposited 
for the benefit of, former patients of the state infirmary, which shall have remained 
unclaimed for more than one year, shall be disposed of as hereinafter provided, by 
the superintendent of said state infirmary and a representative of the trustees there- 
of designated by them, acting as a special board for said purpose, but only if all 
known next of kin of the former patient shall have been notified in writing by the 
said superintendent. The board shall ascertain whether the property has any sale 
value and, if so, shall solicit from at least three reputable dealers in like property 
offers for the purchase thereof, and shall sell the same to the dealer offering the 
highest price. The proceeds of such sale shall be added to the funds of the state 
infirmary known as "Patients' Funds" and shall be disposed of as provided in 
section two C. The board may dispose of such of said property as, in its opinion, 
has no sale value, or any of said property for which no offer, solicited as aforesaid, 
has been received, in such manner as it may deem proper. A complete record of 
each transaction hereunder shall be made and signed by both members of the board 
and filed with the other records at the state infirmary relating to the former patient 
whose property shall have been disposed of as aforesaid. 

Section 2E. Any bank book representing a deposit account in a savings bank or 
trust company within the commonwealth, which belongs to a former patient of the 
state infirmary and shall have remained unclaimed for more than two years in the 
custody of the superintendent of said state infirmary, may be presented by the 



Pt. I. 69 

trustees of the state infirmary to such bank or trust company accompanied by the 
written request of the trustees for payment to them of such deposit account except 
so much as is in excess of the amount due the commonwealth for the support of 
such patient, and such bank or trust company shall thereupon pay to the trustees 
the amount so requested. — (Approved May 25, 1936.) 

Chap. 325. — An Act Relative to Reimbursement by the Commonwealth for 
the Transportation of Certain Persons to the State Infirmary. 
Section fifteen of chapter one hundred and twenty-two of the General Laws, as 
appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby amended by striking out, in the 
seventh and eighth lines, the words ", for the excess over thirty miles by the usual 
route", — so as to read as follows: — Section 15. Towns may at their own expense 
send to the state infirmary, to be maintained at the public charge, all persons falling 
into distress therein and having no settlement within the commonwealth. The 
town shall be reimbursed by the commonwealth, upon bills approved by the depart- 
ment and subject otherwise to the provisions of section forty-two of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one, for the expense of transportation of each person having 
no settlement so sent, at a rate not exceeding twelve cents a mile. — (Approved June 
9, 1936.) 

Chap. 378. — An Act Relative to Reimbursement of Cities and Towns by the 
Commonwealth for the Care and Treatment of Certain Needy Persons 
Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 
therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate 
preservation of the public convenience. 

Section eighteen of chapter one hundred and twenty-two of the General Laws, as 
appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby amended by striking out, in the 
eighteenth and in the twentieth and twenty-first lines, the words "ten dollars and 
fifty cents" and inserting in place thereof, in each instance, the words: — twenty-one 
dollars, — and by inserting after the word "allowed" in the twenty-first line the 
following: — ; provided, that expenses incurred by a town for tonsil and adenoid 
operations shall be reimbursed by the commonwealth to an amount not exceeding 
fifteen dollars in the case of any one such operation, — so as to read as follows: — 
Section 18. Reasonable expenses incurred by a town under the preceding section 
within five days next before notice has been given as therein required and also after 
the giving of such notice and until said sick person is able to be removed to the 
state infirmary shall be reimbursed by the commonwealth. If the department, 
after investigation, deems it expedient as an economy in expenditure and in the 
interest of the patient's health, it may authorize reimbursement for aid rendered 
after the patient has become able to be so removed, and, in its discretion, until the 
patient is able to be discharged. If the department considers it expedient to order 
the removal to the state infirmary of a person whose physical condition is such 
as to require attendance, reasonable expenses incurred for such attendance as 
directed by the department shall also be reimbursed by the commonwealth. Bills 
for such support shall not be allowed unless endorsed with the declaration that, 
after full investigation, no kindred able to pay the amount charged have been 
found, and that the amount has actually been paid from the town treasury, nor 
unless they are approved by the department or by a person designated by it; and 
not more than twenty-one dollars a week shall be allowed for the support of a 
person in a town hospital, and no charges of whatever nature in excess of the said 
twenty-one dollars a week shall be allowed; provided, that expenses incurred by a 
town for tonsil and adenoid operations shall be reimbursed by the commonwealth 
to an amount not exceeding fifteen dollars in the case of any one such operation. 
Reimbursement by the commonwealth under the provisions hereof shall be subject 
to the provisions of section forty-two of chapter one hundred and twenty-one. — 
(Approved June 19, 1936.) 

Chap. 413. — An Act Extending the Provisions of Law Providing for Aid to 
Mothers with Dependent Children 
Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 



70 P.D. 17 

therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate 
preservation of the public convenience. 

Section 1. The General Laws are hereby amended by striking out chapter one 
hundred and eighteen, as amended, and inserting in place thereof the following: — 

Chapter 118. Aid to Dependent Children. 
(See Manual of Laws, Department of Public Welfare, Including Amendments to 
December 31, 1936.)— (Approved June 24, 1936.) 

Chap. 436. — An Act Relative to the Old Age Assistance Law, So Called 

Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 
therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate 
preservation of the public convenience. 

Section 1. The General Laws are hereby amended by striking out chapter one 
hundred and eighteen A, as amended, and inserting in place thereof the following: — 
Chapter 118A. — Adequate Assistance to Certain Aged Citizens. 

(See Manual of Laws, Department of Public Welfare, Including Amendments to 
December 31, 1936.)— (Approved June 30, 1936.) 

Chap. 430. — An Act Amending Certain Provisions of Law Relative to the 
Determination and Establishment of Minimum Fair Wage Standards for 
Women and Minors. 

Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would cause substantial injury to the 
public welfare and would delay necessary protection to women and minors engaged 
in industry in this commonwealth, therefore it is hereby declared to be an emer- 
gency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety 
and convenience. 

Section 1. Chapter one hundred and fifty-one of the General Laws, as appearing 
in section one of chapter three hundred and eight of the acts of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-four, is hereby amended by striking out section one and inserting in 
place thereof the following: — Section 1. In this chapter the following words, unless 
a different meaning is required by the context, shall have the following meanings : 

"Commission", the minimum wage commission which is hereby established in the 
department of public health, but under the control of the commissioner of public 
health, and which shall consist of the commissioner of labor and industries, the 
commissioner of public health and the commissioner of public welfare, ex ofnciis, 
each of whom shall serve without additional compensation, but shall be entitled to 
necessary traveling expenses. The commissioner of labor and industries shall act 
as chairman (Approved June 25, 1936.) 

(See Acts and Resolves, 1936.) 



Pt. I. 



71 



PAST MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITY AND THE 
ADVISORY BOARD OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

In this Department the service of unpaid Board members has always been of 
great value. 



Date of Original 






Appointment 


Name 


Residence 


June 7, 1879 


Moses Kimball 


Boston 


June 7, 1879 


Nathan Allen, M.D. . 


Lowell 


June 7, 1879 


Henry I. Bowditch, M.D. 


Boston 


June 7, 1879 


Charles F. Donnelly 


Boston 


June 7, 1879 


Edward Hitchcock, M.D. 


Amherst . 


June 7, 1879 


Albert Wood, M.D. 


Worcester 


June 7, 1879 


Robert T. Davis, M.D. . 


Fall River 


June 7, 1879 


John C. Hoadley . 


Lawrence 


June 7, 1879 


Ezra Parmenter, M.D. . 


Cambridge 


January 27, 1880 


David L. Webster 


Boston 


June 8, 1880 


Charles F. Folsom, M.D. 


Boston 


June 8, 1880 


Clara T. Leonard 


Springfield 


November 5, 1880 


Thomas Talbot . 


Billerica . 


January 22, 1881 


Alfred Hosmer, M.D. . 


Watertown 


April 18, 1881 


George P. Carter . 


Cambridge 


November 23, 1882 


John Fallon 


Lawrence 


December 8, 1882 


Henry P. Walcott, M.D. 


Cambridge 


February 14, 1883 


Albert A. Haggett 


Lowell 


May 31, 1883 


Reuben Noble 


Westfield 


July 18, 1883 


Edgar E. Dean, M.D. . 


Brockton 


March 19, 1884 


Everett Torrey 


Boston 


June 16, 1885 


Charles A. Denny 


Leicester 


July 16, 1885 


Samuel A. Green, M.D. 


Boston . 


April 14, 1886 


Anne B. Richardson 


Lowell 


April 21, 1886 


Henrietta G. Codman 


Bcookline 


December 22, 1886 


Richard L. Hodgdon, M.D. . 


Arlington 


December 22, 1886 


Charles C. Coffin . 


Boston . 


January 25, 1888 


D. Webster King . 


Boston 


December 4, 1889 


George W. Johnson 


Brookfield 


December 24, 1889 


Henry Stone 


Boston . 


December 24, 1889 


Laban Pratt 


Boston . 


January 1, 1890 


Ziba C. Keith 


Brockton 


June 11, 1891 


Charles J. Curran, M.D. 


North Adams 


June 22, 1893 


Richard M. Hodges, M.D. 


Boston . 


February 15, 1894 


Leontine Lincoln . 


Fall River 


February 14, 1895 


John L. Hildreth, M.D. 


Cambridge 


June 4, 1896 


Edward H. Haskell 


Newton . 


November 16, 1897 


Jabez Fox .... 


Cambridge 


June 22, 1898 


Henry S. Nourse . 


Lancaster 


July 7, 1898 


James M. Pullman, D.D. 


Lynn 


February 23, 1899 


Annette P. Rogers 


Boston . 


December 13, 1899 


Frances Greely Curtis . 


Boston . 


August 7, 1903 


Joseph Walker 


Brookline 


December 9, 1903 


Charles H. Adams 


Melrose . 


December 9, 1903 


David F. Tilley . 


Boston . 


January 14, 1904 


Charles R. Johnson 


Worcester 


June 6, 1906 


A. C. Ratshesky . 


Boston . 


June 20, 1906 


Jeffrey R. Brackett 


Boston . 


June 12, 1907 


Thomas Downey . 


Boston . 


June 16, 1909 


Ada Eliot Sheffield 


Cambridge 


December 30, 1914 


Mary A. Barr 


Boston . 


August 11, 1915 


Robert M. Merrick, M.D. 


Boston . 


August 11, 1915 


Charlotte J. Guild 


Boston . 


November 29, 1916 


Katherine H. Leonard . 


Springfield 


June 20, 1917 


B. Preston Clark . 


Cohasset 


December 10, 1919 


George H. McClean 


Springfield 


December 10, 1919 


Ada Eliot Sheffield 


Cambridge 


December 10, 1919 


Mary P. H. Sherburne . 


Boston 


October 9, 1929 


John J. O'Connor 


Holyoke . 


December 21, 1932 


Cecilia F. Logan . 


Cohasset 


February 28, 1934 


Francis J. Murphy 


Salem 



Retired 



October 27, 


1880 


June 7, 


1880 


January 24, 


1880 


June 7, 


1907 


June 7, 


1906 


June 7, 


1880 


January 22, 


1884 


November 16, 


1882 


February 


1883 


April 11, 


1881 


January 14, 


1881 


March 19, 


1886 


Mareh 12, 


1884 


December 4, 


1882 


June 7, 


1883 


December 15, 


1889 


June 7, 


1885 


October 26, 


1885 


June 16, 


1885 


December 1, 


1887 


August 16, 


1886 


November 4, 


1889 


May 15, 


1889 


January 26, 


1899 


May 16, 


1906 


January 30, 


1893 


December 17, 


1889 


August 5, 


1889 


September 1, 


1903 


January 1, 


1894 


June 7, 


1909 


June 11, 


1891 


June 7, 


1896 


January 1, 


1895 


November 30, 


1919 


July 2, 


1898 


November 2, 


1897 


September 5, 


1900 


November 14, 


1903 


November 22, 


1903 


December 15, 


1899 


September 3, 


1915 


January 16, 


1904 


November 30, 


1919 


August 17, 


1919 


November 30, 


1915 


July 1, 


1931 


December 1, 


1935 


June 27, 


1917 


December 31, 


1914 


November 30, 


1919 


November 30, 


1919 


August 1, 


1916 


November 30, 


1919 


November 30, 


1919 


September 19, 


1929 


December 1, 


1935 


December 1, 


1932 


January 16, 


1934 


December 1, 


1935 


December 1, 


1936 



72 



P.D. 17 



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74 P.D. 17 

Part II 
PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS 
Walter V. McCarthy, Commissioner 

Supervisors 
Miss Florence G. Dickson Miss Alice M. McIntire 

Miss Mary C. Robinson 

Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in three 
legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare to investigate all applications for charitable charters, while the second and 
third call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages 
of this part of the report the functions of the department and the year's work under 
these several statutes are explained. This statement is followed by a tabulation 
of some of the essential figures showing the financial condition and the number of 
persons aided by the various charities. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations Seeking Incorporation 

During the year ending November 30, 1936, 49 applications for charters have 
been referred to this department by the Secretary of the Commonwealth for in- 
vestigation under General Laws (Tercentenary Edition), chapter 180, section 6. 
In 7 cases the applications were withdrawn from this department before the hear- 
ing. One (1) case is pending action of the Secretary of State at the end of the year. 
Fifteen (15) cases are pending action of this department at the end of the year. 
This department has investigated, given hearings and reported on 37 applications, 
including 10 received prior to the beginning of the year. 

Forty-one (41) applications as listed below have been acted upon by the Secretary 
of the Commonwealth. 

Acushnet Hospital Association. 

Associated Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Associations of New 
England, Inc. 

Barnstable County Public Health Association, Incorporated. 

Boston Psychoanalytic Institute. 

Boston Speech School for Crippled Children, The. 

Catholic Welfare Bureau of New Bedford, Inc. 

Children's Singing Guild, of Newton, The. 

Citizens Aid to Armenia, Inc., The. 

Daughters of Israel, Inc. 

Dearborn Hospital, Inc. 

Dilijan Camp Association. 

Dorchester Free Loan Association. 

Dornoe E. Parker and Fannie M. Parker Memorial Hospital. 

First Needlework Guild of Boston. 

Franco-American Club of Revere Inc. 

Gemilas Chesed Temche Shabos Ass'n. Inc. 

General Union of Chimishgadzak, Inc. 

Greenfield Girl Scouts, Inc. 

Hatikvah Sunshine Camp Association. 

Holyoke Girl Scout Council Incorporated. 

Italian-American Civic and Educational Association, Inc. 

Jewish Community Center of Belmont and Watertown, Inc. 

Lawton Memorial Home. 

Liberty Free Loan Association. 

Liberty Free Loan Association. (Second application) 

Live Oaks Manor Inc. 

Lumowaki Camps, Inc., The. 

Maiden Council of Girl Scouts, Inc. 

Maiden Frauen Verein Sheltering Society, Inc. 

Memorial Hospital Corporation. 

Memorial Hospital Corporation. (Second application 

Monsignor James Coyle High School, Inc. 

Norwegian Seamen's Mission of New England. 

Rotary Club Education Fund of Peabody. 



Pt. II. 75 

Saint George The Tropaeophoros, Incorporated. 

St. Joseph's Ladies' Aid Society, Inc. 

St. Luke's Home for Aged Women. 

Slovak Catholic Sokol Gymnastic Club, The. 

Sullivan Memorial Home, The. 

Walpole Council of Girl Scouts, Inc. 

Waltham Community Fund, Inc. 

Thirty-one (31) of these applications have been acted upon and charters issued. 
Charters have been withheld from the following: 

Boston Speech School for Crippled Children, The. 

Citizens Aid to Armenia, Inc., The. 

Daughters of Israel, Inc. 

Dearborn Hospital, Inc. 

Dorchester Free Loan Association. 

Hatikvah Sunshine Camp Association. 

Liberty Free Loan Association. (First application) 

Live Oaks Manor Inc. 

Lumowaki Camps, Inc., The 

Memorial Hospital Corporation. (First application) 

Inspection of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Tercentenary Edition), chapter 121, section 7, requires the Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corpora- 
tion, to make annual inspection or investigation of such corporation. 

During the past year 144 inspections have been made involving numerous con- 
ferences with directors and many visists to institutions. 

There have been 649 inquiries in regard to particular charities and general matters 
connected with the field of private charity. 

Number and Classification of Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts 

Of the 1,313 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
during 1936, 121 are homes for the aged; 151 are child-helping agencies; 264 are 
hospitals or other institutions for aiding the sick; 141 are agencies giving family 
aid; and 216 are organizations doing community, neighborhood or club work. 
The remaining 420 corporations form a miscellaneous group chiefly civic or elee- 
mosynary in their nature. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Tercentenary Edition), chapter 180, section 12, provides that 
every charitable corporation must make to this department an annual financial 
return on or before the first day of November in each year, and further provides that 
if any corporation fails for two successive years to make the report, the Supreme 
Court may decree its dissolution. Figures from the financial reports of corpora- 
tions for the last year are given on the following pages. The abstracts are arranged 
by towns in alphabetical order under each town. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1936 showed the total property, real and per- 
sonal, of all these charities to be $360,652,506. Subscriptions and donations, 
including gifts restricted to capital, brought in $16,057,246. Earnings and refunds, 
including receipts from beneficiaries, amounted to $23,560,067. Interest, dividends, 
annuities and rentals brought in $9,371,554. Legacies were received to the amount 
of $4,449,462; of this sum $2,186,715 was unrestricted. The current receipts were 
$50,587,870. t The current expenditures were $48,618,401 of which $20,114,649 was 
paid for salaries and wages. The agencies reported 24,030 paid employees. 

Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organization or 
agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any such society. 
Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do not mean 
approval; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of conditions calling 
for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in using the fact of inspec- 
tion in such manner as to lead the public to believe that the department approves 
or in any sense commends its work. 



76 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Abington 

1 Abington Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. . 

2 Abington Young Men's Christian Association 1 

3 County Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations 

of Plymouth County, Massachusetts, Incorporated, The 

ACUSHNET 

4 Acushnet Instructive Nursing Association. The 

Adams 

5 Sisters of Providence (Greylock Rest) (See also Holyoke) 



Amesbury 

6 Amesbury and Salisbury Home for Aged Women . 

7 Amesbury Hospital Association, The (not in operation) 

8 Ladies Charitable Society of Amesbury 

Amherst 

9 Amherst Boys Club, Inc. ..... 

10 Amherst Home for Aged Women, The 

11 Wilbur H. H. Ward Educational Trust, Incorporated, ' 

Andover 

12 Andover Guild, The 

13 Andover Home for Aged People .... 

Arlington 

14 Arlington Visiting Nursing Association Inc., The . 

15 Order of St. Anne (St. John's House for Children) 

16 Sachem Council, Inc. of the Boy Scouts of America 

17 Southern Middlesex Health Association 

18 Symmes Arlington Hospital (65 beds) • . 

Athol 

19 Athol Memorial Hospital (not in operation) 

20 Athol Young Men's Christian Association, The 

Attleboro 

21 Attleboro Community Chest, Inc., The, 29 Park St. 

22 Attleborough Hospital, The, 211 Park St. (102 beds) 

23 Attleboro League for Girls and Women, Inc., The, 47 

Bank St 

24 Attleboro Young Mens Christian Association, The, 63 

North Main St 

25 Family Welfare Association of Attleboro, Mass., Inc., 

Park St 

26 John Daggett-Frances A. Crandall Home for Aged 

Women, 550 North Main St. 

27 New England Deaconess Association (Attleboro Springs) 

961 Park St 

28 New England District of the Christian and Missionary 

Alliance Inc. 



Auburn 

29 Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc., The 

30 Skogsblomman Society, Inc. 

Avon 

31 Lutheran Children's Home, Inc. 



32 



37 



Ayer 
Community Memorial Hospital (22 beds) 
Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, Inc , ". 
(See also Maiden) 

Barnstable 
Cape Cod Council Boy Scouts of America, Inc. . 
Cape Cod Educational Foundation 

Cape Cod Hospital (75 beds) .... 
District Nursing Association of Barnstable, Yarmouth 

and Dennis, The ...... 

Hyannis Normal Students Permanent Loan Fund Com 

pany, The . 



Barre 



Stetson Home 



Bedford 
40 Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America, Inc. 



$859 



152 



125,233 



137,657 

9,402 

11,148 



14,933 
105,675 
123,097 



7,229 
129,525 



3,554 
129,630 

2,851 

48,911 

217,433 



1,700 
150,681 



929,018 
20,608 

137,593 

3,490 

94,581 

300,000 
14,731 

898 
1,849 

93,170 

77,657 
20,216 

2.610 
234 

350,700 

6,385 

14,726 

251,945 

67,382 



$507 



1,123 

27 

100 



3,278 
22,111 
8,130 
7,209 
6,250 



5,062 

35,999 
2,410 

3,301 

10,216 

7,033 

2,116 



227 
84 



435 

6,289 
12 

19,182 

4,343 

31 



14,453 



$1,554 

1,775 

18,377 

722 



5,289 
8,159 
4,952 
8,487 
71,080 



67,319 

979 

7,537 

169 

4,694 

27,253 

1,199 



1,123 
71 



1,554 

24,141 
6,801 

1,299 
1.098 

74,883 

3,116 

167 

768 



$169 



3,521 

275 

15 



225 
3,376 
4,507 



4,560 
91 



223 
174 



52 



290 
63 



5,784 
115 
154 

9,902 



- None. 



1 No report. 



Membership. 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



77 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 





Service or Relief Given 


Average 
Number 






Families 




of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


zations 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





$2,062 



$2,037 



$618 



- 


1,944 


2,026 


1,987 


- 


18,650 


19,111 


3,092 


$1,250 
750 


5,511 
275 

817 


4,540 
180 


743 


8,000 * 


1,348 
3,403 
4,507 


1,132 
2,990 
4,646 


531 
950 


- 


4,257 
4,804 


4,268 
4,927 


3,052 
1,829 


3,100* 
4,202 « 


8,659 
30,270 
13,082 
15,920 
76,203 


8,222 
14,659 
13,196 
14,739 
79,015 


5,915 

2,474 

4,872 

6,202 

23,497 


- 


45 
10,614 


10,321 


5,442 


5,357 * 


35,999 
88,026 

4,387 


36,028 
85,486 

4,380 


429 
42,860 

2,639 


- 


17,754 


17,741 


8,873 


- 


7,255 


7,024 


2,378 


- 


7,777 


4,953 


2,027 


- 


27,860 


32,776 


8,528 


- 


3,063 


2,731 


- 


- 


1,365 
155 


1,680 
72 


470 


200 


10,411 


10,231 


3,025 


- 


24,431 


28,405 


12,198 


- 


7,301 


6,821 


3,008 


22,000 *\ 
24,003 / 


7,588 
1,111 

124,161 


6,783 
1,195 

91,051 


2,349 
611 

33,374 


- 


7,575 


7,118 


5,027 


- 


353 


355 


- 


- 


11,000 


16,028 


6,364 


17,229 ~™ 


31,683 


13,171 


1,653 


4 Restricted to capital 




5 Attendance. 



3 


423 


329 


12 


535 


17 


2 


12 


_ 



100 2 

6 
47 

13,756 5 



529 2 



1,747 « 



33 



_3 

47 



4 


2,079 


1,219 


2 


71 


15 


2 


2,293 2 


- 


30 


110 


- 


54 


2,213 


83 



76 


1,718 


41 


3 


600 


150 


6 


1,710 


725 


2 


- 


- 


4 


13 


- 


18 


259 


3 



603 « 



19 



11 


625 


- 


5 


28 


- 


1 
18 


673 2 
262 




46 


3,256 


6 


4 


394 


59 


- 


4 


4 


8 


108 


107 



216 



19 



300 



54 



24 



27 



78 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Naub and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Belmont 
Belmont Community Nursing Association . 
Belmont Relief Society, Inc. 3 

Berlin 
Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Destitute Chil- 
dren, Incorporated, The . 

Beverly 
Beverly Female Charitable Society, The 

Beverly Fuel Society, 246 Cabot St 

Beverly Hebrew Community Center, Inc., 37 Bow St. . 

Beverly Hospital Corporation, Herrick St. (137 beds) . 
Beverly School for the Deaf, 6 Echo Ave. . 
Country Week Association . . . 

Essex County Health Association, Inc., 222 Cabot St. . 
Fisher Charitable Society, 175 Cabot St. . 

Old Ladies Home Society, 78 Lothrop St. . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Beverly, Mass., 
The, 245 Cabot St 



BlLLERICA 

14 Pines Community Association, The 

Boston 

15 Academy of Medicine, Inc. ..... 

16 A. C. Ratshesky Foundation, 30 Court St. . 

17 Adams Nervine Asylum, 990 Centre St., Jamaica Plain 

(36 beds) 

18 Agoos Family Charity Fund, The .... 

19 Alumni Mutual Fund of Boston University School of 

Theology, Inc., The, 72 Mt. Vernon St. . 

20 American Humane Education Society, The, 180 Long- 

wood Ave. ........ 

21 American Invalid Aid Society, 2 Park Square 

22 American Irish Pioneers Foundation .... 

23 American Ramabai Association, The .... 

24 American Unitarian Association, 25 Beacon St. . 

25 American Women's Overseas League of New England, 

Inc. ......... 

26 Animal Rescue League of Boston, 51 Carver St. . 

27 Armenian Women's Welfare Association, Inc., 190 Beacon 

St 

28 Army and Navy Service Committee, Inc., 8 Fayette St. 

29 Associated Jewish Centers Camp, Inc., The, 7 Water St. 

30 Associated Jewish Philanthropies, Inc., 333 Washington 

St 

31 Associated Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew 

Associations of New England, Inc., 7 Water St. 

32 Association for Independent Co-operative Living, 11 

Nassau St. ....... . 

33 Association for the Work of Mercy in the Diocese of 

Massachusetts, The, 244 Townsend St., Roxbury 

34 Association of Andranovites Saint Nicholas, Inc. . 

35 Association of the Evangelical Lutheran Church for 

Works of Mercy, The, 670 Baker St., West Roxbury . 

36 Association of the House of the Good Samaritan, 25 

Binney St. (80 beds) 

37 Auxiliary of American Jewish Women for Community 

Service, Inc. ....... 

38 Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian and Polish Jewish 

Central Committee at Jerusalem .... 

39 Baby Hygiene Association, 137 Newbury St. 

40 Baikar Association Inc., 296 H Shawmut Ave. 

41 Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc., The, 35 Temple St. 

42 Beethoven Memorial Foundation, Incorporated . 

43 Belgian Netherland American Social and Benevolent 

Club Inc 

44 Beneficent Society of the New England Conservatory of 

Music, The, 294 Huntington Ave 

45 Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches, 11 Bul- 

finch PI 

46 Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches (North 

End Union) 20 Parmenter St. . ♦ . . 



$11,386 
5,605 



5,000 



3,246 



317.997 



$1,739 
5,867 



43 



4.575 



191,708 
171,911 


- 


37,334 


282 


448,654 

8,343 

39 

987 


1,000 
1,556 

73 


8,344,341 


89,649 


27 


83 


1.249,089 


10,245 


4,328 
28,304 
11,161 


291 

6,723 

26 


145,119 


530,965 


99 


2,520 


35,256 


746 


116,904 
104 


12,100 

1 


119,260 


4,137 


1,147,658 


44,295 


101 

92,506 

26,453 

51,810 

5 


3,133 

9,464 

60 


5.196 


280 


20,838 


915 


831,594 


2.417 


404 


14,079 



$2,022 
1,603 



75 

18,084 

4,257 
1,489 

4 

22 

3 

36,523 

345 

193 
12,993 

1,133 

15,087 
1,550 

2,058 
10,861 



28,211 
13,430 



244 
340 



$277 
72 



4,233 

28,483 

48 


286 
2,637 


925 


177 

1,248 


1,278,272 

202,350 

102 

1,572 

69,501 


27,029 

881 

3,925 

11,137 


134,277 

62,558 

110 

4,804 


34,924 
2,360 

3,230 


262.986 


376 


1,518 


9,834 


232,381 


8,009 


10,891 


1,235 



6,373 



35,220 
8,404 



18,211 
236 



275,432 



45,996 



3,935 



1.824 
1 

3.396 

25,844 

4.312 

77 

546 

35,978 

921 



None. 



'No report; 



2 Visits 



3 Report for 8 months. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



79 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$4,039 
7,581 



$3,973 
5,535 



$3,415 
2,457 



3,1912 
146 



778 2 
126 



471 
121 



- 


463 


750 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


$257 


1,505 


1,267 


168 


2 


2 


- 


- 


3,563 


3,663 


1,054 


— 


5 


— 


/ 7,122*1 
I 11.311 / 














201,350 


194,920 


91,292 


— 


116 


4,250 


500 


66,300 


62,762 


31,503 


- 


30 


91 


- 


4,035 


3,958 


1,335 


- 


9 


198 


- 


15,942 


15,344 


5,263 


1 


2 


76 


150 


3,380 


3,807 


600 


1 


1 


67 


/ 5,000*1 
\ 23,250 / 














34,978 


9,611 


3,917 


1 


4 


11 


6,000 


26,136 


20,092 


10,498 


- 


17 


612 



198 



40 

85 

125 



407 



100 



5,000 
200 



1.570 



67,176*1 
23,618 / 



5,161*1 
50,110 I 



4,300*! 

48 / 



2,100 
23,012* 



16,024 

53,505 
8,404 

5,443 

22,670 

1,792 

4 

162 

339,575 



142,364 

637 
6,917 
13,019 

534,949 

3,654 

15,836 

15,476 
2 

11,729 

80,000 



54,673 
5,858 



25,373 
2,244 

624 
345,055 

128 

106,502 

308 
6,747 
10,416 

510,958 

3,116 

15,881 

16,061 
185 

9,189 

85,544 



23,644 



17,736 
864 



4,922 
2,697 

21,017 

910 

4,927 

6,291 

3,120 

46,545 



35 


65 


42 


- 


- 


118 


118 


- 


15 
1 


_5 

207 


_5 

207 


- 


- 


2,000 


2,000 


- 


32 


190 


190 


- 


44 


109,758 6 


_5 


- 


5 
22 


18,185 
230 


17,766 


20 

18 


_5 
1 

7 


_5 


_5 




62 


4 


16 


7 


147 
4 


126 
4 


3 

4 


5 


23 


18 


- 


54 


490 


395 


_ 



3,133 

4,312 

37,676 

13,430 

60 



3,050 

4,312 

38,228 

13,012 

54 



23,195 
4,303 



12 


_5 


- 


7 


137 


11 


- 


30 


30 



602 

1,801 

38,396 

15,037 



630 

850 

37,499 

15,074 



28,318 

10,919 1 



20 -« 

14 1,176 



Restricted to Capital. 



80 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Boston — Con. 

1 Benoth Israel Sheltering Home, 6 North Russell St. l . 

2 Bethany Union for Young Women, The, 14 Worcester St. 

3 Beth El Free Loan Society of Dorchester, Inc., The, 94 

Fowler Street, Dorchester ..... 

4 Beth Israel Hospital Association, 330 Brookline Ave. 

(215 beds) 

5 Beth Israel Hospital Women's Auxiliary, Inc. 

6 Board of Ministerial Aid, The, 14 Beacon St. 

7 Boston and Maine Railroad Employees' Fund, Incorpo- 

rated, 150 Causeway St 

8 Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society, 15 Ashburton 

Place 

9 Boston Baptist Social Union, 15 Ashburton Place 

10 Boston Branch, Baron de Hirsch Fund, 24 Province St. 

11 Boston Branch of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, 

Inc., 30 Kenilworth St., Roxbury .... 

12 Boston Children's Aid Society, 41 Mt. Vernon St. 

13 Boston Children's Friend Society, 45 Rutland St. 

14 Boston City Hospital, The, 818 Harrison Ave. (2,229 

beds) . . . . . . . 

15 Boston Community Centre, Inc., of the Volunteers of 

America, 25 Hanover St. ..... 

16 Boston Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 38 Chauncy 

St. s 

17 Boston Council of Girl Scouts, 280 Dartmouth St. 

18 Boston Dispensary, The, 25 Bennet St. (20 beds) 

19 Boston Educational Association for Deaf Children 

20 Boston Episcopal Charitable Society, The . 

21 Boston Evening Clinic and Hospital, 452 Beacon St. 

22 Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society 

23 Boston Floating Hospital, The, 20 Ash St. (50 beds) 

24 Boston Guild for the Hard of Hearing, 339 Common- 

wealth Ave. ........ 

25 Boston Health League, Incorporated, 80 Federal St. 

26 Boston Home for Incurables, The, 2049 Dorchester Ave., 

Dorchester 

27 Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc. . 

28 Boston Industrial Home, 17 Davis St. ... 

29 Boston Ladies Bethel Society, 332 Hanover St. . 

30 Boston Lakeshore Home ...... 

31 Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society, 43 South St. 

32 Boston Legal Aid Society, The, 16A Ashburton Place . 

33 Boston Lions Club Edward E. Allen Recreational Camps 

Inc 

34 Boston Lying-in Hospital, 221 Longwood Ave. (232 beds) 

35 Boston Marine Society, The, 88 Broad St. . 

36 Boston Music School Settlement, Inc., The, 41 Allen St. 

37 Boston Nursery for Blind Babies, 147 South Huntington 

Ave. ......... 

38 Boston Pilots' Relief Society, 470 Atlantic Ave. . 

39 Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Managers of, 11 

North Square ....... 

40 Boston Provident Association, 41 Hawkins St. 

41 Boston Public School Teachers* Retirement Fund, 15 

Beacon St. . . . . . 

42 Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Inc., 7 Harcourt 

St 

43 Boston Seaman's Friend Society (Incorporated) . 

44 Boston Section Council of Jewish Women 

45 Boston Society for the Care of Girls, The, 41 Mt. Vernon 

St 

46 Boston Society of Optometrists, Incorporated 

47 Boston Students Union, 81 St. Stephen St. 

48 Boston Students Union — Students House Corporation 

(Unincorporated), 96 The Fenway and 81 St. Stephen St. 

49 Boston Tuberculosis Association, 554 Columbus Ave. 

50 Boston United Moath Chitim Association, The, 24 

Province St. . 

51 Boston Urban League, Inc., 20 Whittier St. 

52 Boston Veteran Journalists' Benevolent Association, Inc. 

53 Boston Wesleyan Association, 581 Boylston St. 

54 Boston Work Horse Relief Association, 109 Northampton 

St 



$54,374 


$1,434 


$11,640 


168 


579 


27,868 


2,408,442 

19,407 

105,274 


256,592 
21,009 
19,256 


307,578 

7,935 

201 


98,592 


- 


- 


226,333 
4,034 
9,137 


23,401 
3,000 


1,160 


44,262 


12,920 


- 


840,127 
466,608 


14,545 
16,389 


25,707 
14,063 


14,762,443 


3,882,475 


333,910 


- 


- 


17,883 


154,727 

49,172 

734,859 

3,229 

197,885 

12,000 

258,542 

1,174,349 


45,956 

11,423 

140,154 

1,075 

2,606 

2,821 

30,601 


175 

. 1,877 

106,273 

2,595 
130 


47,866 

2,285 


7,708 
5,350 


3,915 


1,780,993 

81 

93,343 

56 

48,287 

107,569 

138,593 


413 

50 

6,550 

138 

2,865 
20,851 


12,014 

54 

6,049 

12,389 


519 


357 


810 


3,736,192 

415,161 

9,660 


9.818 
8,510 
3,987 


295,489 

354 

4,622 


69,848 
312,287 


1,145 

4,895 


1,892 
9,185 


742,097 
434,438 


2,000 
91,583 


4,971 

2,777 


1,749,522 


- 


71,061 


19,054 

371,108 

15,498 


6,000 
17,859 
14,798 


15,365 
8,309 
4,516 


503,677 

203 

34,000 


1,890 
321 

-7 


2,495 
379 

_7 


1,476 
206,044 


1,067 
15,956 


45,141 
8,740 


102 

180 

2,556 

611,340 


5,193 

5,390 

111 


8 
111 

63,425 


131,721 


1,302 


841 



$1,380 



196 

344 

4,702 



1,483 

30,440 

224 

2,555 

38,925 
19,748 

2,721 



8,258 

2,015 

15,549 

150 

7,604 

11,224 
40,243 



55,757 

2,124 
1 
1,844 
4,335 
6,832 



57,632 
17,731 



25,108 
15,092 



26,247 
22,216 



70,395 



15,650 
57 



27,806 



3,684 



55 
10,594 



5,486 



- None. 1 No report. 2 Not stated. 

7 Reported under Boston Students Union — Students House Corporation. 



3 Restricted to capital. 
8 Animals. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



81 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$500 


$14,955 


$15,030 


$5,591 


- 


28.447 


29,074 


- 


_ 


564,366 


536,616 


260,055 


— 


29,289 


30,388 


4,246 


689 


24,850 

2 

29,226 


24,470 




3,181 


24,962 


18,145 


— 


33,440 


35.777 


17,693 


- 


224 


7 


- 


377 


15,853 


14,822 


4,185 


1,779 3 \ 
19,747 / 








98,926 


89,013 


— 


3.562 


53,916 


49,725 


16,185 


387 3 1 








270 / 


4,219,376 


3,878,709 


2,246,521 


- 


17,883 


27,084 


11,172 


_ 


34,180 


34,479 


24,191 


1,916 3 


15,316 


13,529 


8,292 


5.275 3 


257,912 


261,506 


159,034 


— 


150 


66 


66 


- 


8,679 


7,717 


387 


— 


5,201 


5,805 


1,995 


592 3 


14,175 


15,467 


- 


35,836 3 


70,845 


84,187 


30,013 


_ 


11,765 


11,765 


6,404 


— 


5,350 


5,093 


3,689 


352 3 \ 
3,100 J 








71.435 


63,639 


33,485 


— 


104 


116 


— 


- 


14,724 


16,960 


4,918 


— 


139 


135 


- 


534 


2,379 


1,844 


100 


— 


7.200 


10,530 


260 


20,144 


60,217 


44,202 


36,322 


_ 


1,173 


1,765 


570 


31,750 3 \ 
3,000 / 








365,734 


398,941 


147,631 


500 3 


26,596 


22,931 


3,600 


- 


8,609 


7,893 


6,315 


30,823 3 


27,145 


24,443 


11,809 


- 


29,173 


22,687 


300 


_ 


33,218 


29,245 


12,557 


- 


115,578 


121,968 


25,231 


- 


141,456 


57,906 


890 


_ 


21,365 


20,940 


16,894 


9,737 


51,556 


49,541 


22,234 


- 


19,372 


7,773 


- 


6,143 


38,335 


37,870 


_ 


— 


701 


716 


149 


_7 


_7 


_7 




_ 


46,476 


39,921 


11,809 


~ 


40,797 


40,991 


24,005 


_ 


5,201 


5,222 


_ 


- 


5,501 


5,742 


3,480 


— 


166 


78 


- 


— 


74,198 


71,581 


30,749 


3,100 3 \ 
16,000 / 








23,629 


8,269 


4,811 



250 



37 

302 

9,481 



3,000 



302 
2,054 



3,000 



11 


241 


80 


349 


2,351 


179,441 


166,764 


- 


28 


_2 


_2 


- 


9 
5 
155 
4 
2 
5 

29 


4,290 6 

2,268 « 

24,637 

38 

200 

5,396 

142 

1,006 


_2 
_2 

12,366 

38 

200 

520 

142 

1,006 


- 


8 
3 


945 


709 


- 


44 


68 


20 


- 


14 


15,461 


5,171 


30 


1 

24 


21 
10,205 


21 
7,499 


_ 


6 


35 


15 


- 


227 
9 


11,112 
116 

178 


7,063 

116 

49 


- 


13 


36 
21 


30 
21 


- 


12 
11 


15,689 


6,205 


21 
1,418 


1 


385 


- 


- 


31 
15 


63 

18,289 

302 


31 

7,949 

16 


67 


_ 


-4 


_4 




2 

_7 


84 

_7 


6 

_7 


- 


18 
20 


_2 

6,726 


_2 

6,530 


1,166 


2 


1,719 

_2 


1,719 

_2 


401 


19 


1 


1 


: 



22 



2,456 ' 



4 Reported under Children's Aid Association. 



5 Report for 15 months. 



Membership. 



82 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Boston — Con. 

1 Boston Young Men's Christian Association, 316 Hunting- 

ton Ave. ........ 

2 Boston Young Men's Christian Union, 48 Boylston St. 3 

3 Boston Young Women's Christian Association, 140 

Clarendon St. 4 

4 Boston Zezmer Association Inc. ..... 

5 Boys' Clubs of Boston Incorporated, The, 15 Green St., 

Charlestown ........ 

6 Brigham Hospital (not in operation) .... 

7 British Charitable Society, 5 Park Sq. ... 

8 Brooke House. 79 Chandler St. 1 .... 

9 Brothers of Charity, Inc., The, 11 Perkins St., Jamaica 

Plain 

10 Burnap Free Home for Aged Women, 38 Pleasant St., 

Dorchester . . . . . . . 

11 Burrage Hospital Association (not in operation) . 

12 Butrimantz Social & Aid Association .... 

13 Calvary Rescue Mission, Inc., 12 Marshall St. 

14 Camp Alcott, Inc. ....... 

15 Camp Dorchester Association Incorporated . 

16 Cape Cod Association ...... 

17 Carney Hospital, 39 Old Harbor St., South Boston (163 

beds) 

18 Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Inc., 39 Old Harbor 

St., South Boston 

19 Channing Home, in Boston, 198 Pilgrim Rd. 

20 Charitable Irish Society, The, 40 Court St. . 

21 Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop, 1 Vila St. 

22 Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of the 

23 Charles H. Hood Fund, 500 Rutherford Ave. 

24 Charles Irwin Travelli Fund, The . . . 

25 Charlestown Charity Fund, Trustees of the 

26 Charlestown Poor's Fund, Trustees of the . 

27 Charlotte Cushman Club of Boston, The, 1 Marlborough 

St 

28 Chevra Schass of Boston, Inc., 45 Intervale St., Roxbury 

29 Children's Aid Association (Unincorporated) 41 Mt. 

Vernon St. ........ 

30 Children's Hospital, The, 300 Longwood Ave., (269 beds) 

31 Children's Mission to Children, The, 20 Ashburton Place 

32 Children's Museum of Boston, 60 Burroughs St., Jamaica 

Plain 

33 Chinese Mission of New England, 16 Oxford St. . 

34 Christopher Shop, Inc., The, 93 Massachusetts Ave. 

35 Church Home Society for the Care of Children of the Pro- 

testant Episcopal Church, The, 41 Mt. Vernon St. 

36 City Missionary Society, 14 Beacon St. 

37 Clara C. Hyams Fund, Inc., 49 Federal St. . 

38 Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston, The, 376 West 

Fourth St., South Boston .... 

39 Commonwealth Charitable Corporation 

40 Community Federation of Boston, 80 Federal St. 

41 Community Health Association, 137 Newbury St. 

42 Community Service of Boston, Inc., 739 Boylston St. 

43 Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachusetts, The, 

102 Bowdoin St. ..... . 

44 Congregation Tikvos Yisroel and New Dorchester Hebrew 

School ' 

45 Consumers' League of Massachusetts (Inc.), 31A Mt. 

Vernon St. ...... . 

46 Consumptives' Home, Trustees of the 

47 Cooperative Workrooms, Inc., 36 Washington St. 8 

48 Council for Greater Boston Camp Fire Girls, 100 Boylston 

St. 

49 Craigie Foundation, The » 

50 Daly Industrial School, The, 111 Train St., Dorchester 

51 Dawn Patrol, Incorporated .... 

52 Deaconess' Aid Society of New England 

53 Dean Foundation for Little Children, Inc. . 

54 Denison House, 93 Tyler St. * 

55 Deutsches Altenheim, Incorporated, 2222 Centre St. 

West Roxbury 

56 Devens Benevolent Society .... 

57 Diocesan Board of Missions. 1 Joy St. 



$2,854,953 
1,860,304 


$89,180 
42,196 


$1,005,321 
14,472 


$19,518 
15,708 


255 


30 


- 


5 


948,283 

1,165 

70,071 


79,577 
533 


3,253 

474 


7,059 
2,626 



20,791 



432,837 


194 


_ 


18,827 


74,702 


— 


— 


1,003 


212 


227 


345 


_ 


542 


1,626 


— 


25 


4,500 


470 


1,102 


_ 


3,699 


778 


54 


_ 


24,821 


- 


- 


1,258 


272,453 


3,649 


167,657 


9,036 


8,979 


1,041 


_ 


_ 


339,354 


6 


10,500 


11,889 


16,726 


4,060 


2,380 


3 


62,907 


— 


25,393 


1,540 


76,711 


— 


— 


3,338 


143,185 


17,343 


— 


7,493 


547 


56,000 


— 


_ 


7,752 


— 


— 


252 


73,404 


- 


- 


2,930 


55,628 


1,862 


4,157 


212 


6,109 


4,042 


744 


- 


6,216 


175,629 


_ 


_ 


7,094,964 


149,058 


258,504 


194,131 


975,582 


20,085 


5,481 


39,520 


132,098 


12,685 


_ 


4,498 


271 


5,021 


— 


— 


17,479 


8,445 


9,445 


- 


303,647 


38,945 


18,422 


12,802 


384,282 


19,437 


6,938 


15,030 


1,406,971 


- 


- 


82,060 


18,494 


987 


_ 


473 


— 


2,500 


— 


— 


14,102 


— 


— 


— 


825,958 


124,535 


120,385 


41,908 


16,154 


16,564 


- 


- 


311,618 


1,556 


- 


14,583 



46 

65,159 

8,480 


5,768 
9,077 


5,460 


2,659 
25 


26,411 


5,517 


21,109 


- 


92,213 

21 

23,762 

415,281 


10,000 

71 

960 


14,726 

58 

649 


1,320 

1,089 
10,673 


1,151,308 

2,055 

213,739 


246 
4,430 


2,510 


34,499 

53 

11.740 



No report. 



2 Restricted to Capital. 



3 Report for 9 months. 



4 Report not due. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



83 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$57,638 2 $1,104,889 $1,113,891 
23,040 2 72,377 72,070 



717 21 
12 



35 

89,902 
3,635 



100 

89,507 

3,802 



$639,538 
27,305 



62,126 



531 
32 



66,293 41,418 
5,070 2,139 



10,491 5 



4,660 



4,721 



9,000 2 


19,022 
1,003 
573 
1,651 
1,572 
1,833 
1,258 


15,196 

872 

670 

1,734 

1,744 

1,758 

892 


5,582 
780 
50 
364 
683 
261 
125 


7.942 


188,284 


179,882 


63,297 


2,000 


1,041 
24,396 

6,443 
26,933 

3,338 

24,837 

56,000 

252 

2,930 


683 

23,885 

6,263 

25,858 

3,290 

6,970 

57,207 

778 

2,372 


12.613 

1,300 

17,217 

200 

350 


- 


6,232 
4,786 


6,344 
4,729 


616 
2,792 


73,208 2 
4,000 


175,629 

547,487 

69,086 


176,600 

548,430 

66,266 


68,699 

260,560 

27,222 


- 


17,916 

5,021 

17,890 


17,725 

5,278 

16,931 


13,975 
1,957 
4,411 


17,549 2 

2,500 2\ 

873 / 


70,175 

42,280 
82,060 


80,902 

55,848 
97,099 


25.382 

29,658 
1,673 


20,500 


1,460 
2,500 

292,340 
16,564 


2,812 

2,500 

49,011 

295,290 

16,279 


676 

34,288 

263,628 

11,595 


10.613 


26,753 


19,101 


735 


100 


5,868 
2,659 
14,563 


5,886 
2,833 
16,150 


4,143 
4,924 


1,000 2 


26,627 


25,775 


6,316 


- 


26,046 

130 

2,699 

10,673 


17,890 

108 

2,721 

10,136 


3.438 
1,250 


34,967 


72,224 

53 

16,171 


19,339 

214 

14,830 


6.452 



- 


- 


14 


14 


- 


- 


- 


5 

1 


26 


26 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


7 


_ 


- 


1 


42,512 t 


42,512 ^ 


19 


- 


— 


11 


80 


6 


— 


— 


- 


12 


118 


27 


- 


5 


1 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


195 


13,425 


3,139 


- 


- 


- 


12 


72 


11 


- 


1 


1 


— 


6 


6 


— 


15 


- 


13 


_ 6 


_ 6 


- 


- 


1 


— 


6 


6 


— 


2 


- 


- 


127 


127 


124 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


213 


— 


- 


4 


4 


- 


— 


1 


- 


- 


- 


125 


- 


_ 


1 


342 


26 


_ 


_ 


- 


3 


_6 


_6 


- 


- 


_ 


39 


969 


668 


_ 


_ 


- 


327 


23,376 


_8 


- 


- 


- 


13 


457 


381 


- 


4 


_ 


10 


65,000 ^ 


65,000 ^ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


_« 


_6 


_ 


_ 


- 


4 


209 


_a 


- 


4 


- 


22 


259 


68 


- 


4 


1 


25 


512 


215 


576 


1 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


41 


- 


3 


47 


47 


46 


1 


_ 


75 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


169 


43,125 


_6 


- 


- 


- 


8 


-6 


_« 


- 


- 


2 


2 


70 


70 


- 


- 


_ 


2 
7 


490 


490 


: 


1 
1 


- 


21 


2,150 s 


_6 


115 


9 


_ 


3 


130 


3 


_ 


_ 



Membership. 



6 Not stated. 



7 Attendance. 



8 Report for three months. 



84 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Dorchester 



Boston — Con. 

1 Directory, Inc., The (for Mothers' Milk), 221 Longwood 

Ave. ......... 

2 Disabled Ex-Service Men's Exchange, Inc., 355 Boylston 

St 

3 Disabled Veterans Hospital Service Inc., 376 Boylston St. 

4 Dorchester House, Incorporated, 7 Gordon Place, Dor- 

chester ........ 

5 Durant Incorporated, The ...... 

6 East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc. 

7 Eastern Star of Massachusetts Charitable Foundation, Inc. 

8 Edward Hatch Memorial, Inc. * . 

9 Elizabeth Peabody House Association, The, 357 Charles St. 

10 Ellen M. Gifford Sheltering Home Corporation, The, 20 

Undine Rd., Brighton 

11 Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc., 66 Berkeley St. 

12 Emergency Planning and Research Bureau, Inc., 120 

Boylston St. . 

13 Employees Benevolent Association, Inc. 5 

14 Employees' Fund, Incorporated . 

15 Episcopal City Mission, The, 1 Joy St. 

16 Eretz Israel Aid Society, 20 Charlotte St., 

17 European Aid Society, Inc., 800 Morton St., Dorchester 

18 Evangelistic Association of New England, 88 Tremont St. 

19 Faith and Hope Association, The, 73 Tremont St. 



20 Family Welfare Society of Boston, 41 Hawkins St. e 

21 Farm and Trades School, The, Thompson's Island 

22 Fathers and Mothers Club, The, 68 Devonshire St. 

23 Faulkner Hospital Corporation, The, 1153 Centre St 

Jamaica Plain (142 beds) .... 

24 Federated Jewish Charities of Boston, 6 North Russell St 

25 Fellowcrafters Guild, 165 Newbury St. 

26 First-Spiritualist-Ladies Aid Society of Boston 

27 Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, 88 Tremont 

St 

28 Forest Hills General Hospital, Incorporated, 41 Morton 

St., Jamaica Plain (117 beds) .... 

29 Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children, 140 The Fenway 

(12 beds) 

30 Foundation for Temperance Education, Inc., The 

31 Fragment Society, The ..... 

32 Frances E. Willard Settlement, 45 Milk St. . 

33 Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc., 50 Beacon St., Hyde 

Park 

34 Franklin Square House, The, 11 East Newton St. 

35 Franklin Typographical Society .... 

36 Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation, The . 

37 Frederika Home, Inc., 65 Deaconess Rd. 

38 Freeman L. Lowell Memorial Hospital and Dispensary 

2A Milford St 

39 French Benevolent and Relief Association . 

40 French Women's Christian Association 

41 General Alliance of Unitarian and Other Liberal Christian 

Women, 25 Beacon St 

42 General Union of Chimishgadzak, Inc. 

43 George H. and Irene L. Walker Home for Children, Incor 

porated ....... 

44 German Aid Society of Boston, The, 35 Chardon St. 

45 German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston, 2222 Centre St 

West Roxbury ...... 

46 Girl Scout Training School, Inc., 87 Beacon St. . 

47 Girls' Friendly Society Home .... 

48 Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of Massachusetts, 

Inc., The, 29 Fairfield St 

49 Good Will House Association, 177 Webster St., East 

Boston ........ 

50 Greater Boston Bikur Cholim Hospital, 45 Townsend St. 

Roxbury (34 beds) ..... 

51 Greenwood Church Community House Inc., 386 Washing 

ton St.. Dorchester ..... 

52 Grosberg Family Charity Fund, Inc. . 

53 Guild of St. Apollonia, Inc., The 

54 Guild of St. Elizabeth, The, 27 Dudley St., Roxbury 

55 Habit Clinic for Child Guidance, Inc., 48 Rutland St. 

56 Hahnemann Hospital (not in operation) 

57 Hairenik Association, 13 Shawmut St. 

58 Hale House Association, 12 Davis St. . 



$28,927 


$3,225 


$18,041 


- 


19,389 
8,372 


8,441 
6,391 


21,455 


$406 
136 


49,156 

56,067 

491 

146,401 


3,856 

34 

797 

29,944 


24 

77 

16,254 

1,078 


2,338 
184 


165,067 


24,648 


11,967 


869 


205,365 
54,471 


1,305 
20,872 


5,604 


7,620 


25,326 

1,498 

92,240 

1,239,091 

197 

56 

9,741 

14,446 


35,700 
2,186 

35,002 

92 

149 

12,091 

• 4,299 


100 

19,928 

49 

584 

10 

2.232 


223 

3,517 
38,441 

243 


857,737 

709,425 

25,072 


203,128 

10,702 

290 


2,042 

10,291 

146 


16,730 

29,061 

553 


1,490,074 
181,031 


22,565 
396 


239,358 


3,720 
4,095 


194 


78 


- 


9 


699,134 


27,733 


13,103 


12,722 


288,524 


- 


124,562 


- 


96,571 

6,875 

61,154 

322,832 


9,790 

2,472 
25,508 


61,185 
70,847 


106,060 

369 

2,440 

4,190 


272,515 
783,252 
88,725 
738,018 
272,130 


5,049 
3,338 


6,922 

220,731 

66 

500 

4,698 


12,256 
13,491 
3,115 

28,856 
12,567 


110,802 

493 

9,240 


4,232 
9 


1,608 
534 


: 


324,033 
911 


23,739 

785 


664 


15,804 



69,056 

36,116 
30,984 
37,752 

93,570 

19,382 

82,882 

40,127 

108,021 

592 

12,335 

287 

158,285 

51,353 

122,685 



392 

1,563 

3,337 

10,968 

6,279 

626 

4,752 
942 
7,706 
70,202 
8,300 
9,582 



804 
3.817 

13,165 

142 

24,981 

4,158 

1,665 
2,493 



44,584 
2.557 



3,570 

1,331 

723 

132 

146 



4,500 

56 

4,118 



None. 



No report. 



2 Not stated. 



3 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



85 



Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 





Service or Relief Given 


Average 










Number 






Families 




of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


zations 


ployees 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





$21,267 



$21,138 



$7,665 



- 


29,710 


28,060 


5,966 


- 


6,527 


7,136 


1,352 


- 


6,219 


5,162 


3,796 


— 


112 


293 


— 


- 


17,052 


17,681 


137 


$84 3 


30,825 


29,196 


9,778 


- 


37,486 


38,273 


20,507 


2,000 


10,926 


8,300 


2,983 


1,000 


27,477 


25,624 


16,275 


- 


36,024 


32,431 


_ 


— 


2,186 


688 


— 


— 


3,517 


2,330 


— 


9,240 3 


93,372 


79,371 


36,860 


— 


142 


140 


— 


- 


751 


733 


- 


2,000 s 


12,345 


11,633 


5,349 


- 


6,531 


7,155 


1,235 


10,320 3 \ 
11,000 / 








227,902 


266,892 


87,085 


- 


50,055 


65,616 


28,672 


- 


989 


868 


311 


23,000 3 


271,046 


265,485 


109,798 


1,500 


5,992 


6,735 


- 


_ 


88 


239 


_ 


1,885 3 \ 








15,491 / 


69,051 


55,796 


28,196 


- 


125,157 


124,767 


44,813 


_ 


177,036 


184,606 


108,484 


— 


369 


369 


- 


3,600 3 


4,912 


3,988 


- 


4,852 


105,565 


101,684 


30,946 


_ 


19,179 


10,422 


4,925 


- 


244,891 


252,758 


139,123 


- 


6,519 


7,289 


75 


- 


29,356 


27,400 


3,850 


- 


17,265 


10,675 


3,247 


- 


5,840 


10,252 


3,551 


- 


544 


1,250 


200 


_ 


36,431 


37,911 


5,600 


- 


1,450 


841 


- 


- 


4,028 


4,476 


720 


- 


2,211 


2,093 


200 


— 


804 


112 


— 


- 


6,130 


4,959 


1,472 


- 


17,522 


17,254 


3,629 


- 


11,258 


10,179 


7,451 


- 


31,548 


30,360 


14,213 


_ 


4,787 


4,777 


1,555 


- 


4,500 


4,791 


- 


- 


6,509 


6,322 


2,500 


- 


3,492 


4,527 


1,940 


- 


7,794 


9,096 


7,823 


- 


4,118 


1,423 


— 


- 


52,884 


53,460 


24,152 


7,640 


23,769 


18,158 


9,782 



3 


_2 


_2 


_ 


1 


2,581 


2,581 


~ 


18 


451 


_2 


- 


9 


180 
34 


180 


- 


17 


2,122 


1,206 


" 


6 
12 


2,085 « 

_ 2 


2,085 4 

_2 


_2 


60 


666 
3 

_2 


666 
3 

_2 


25 
3 


- 


- 


- 


11 



- 


26 
3 


114 
50 


23 
50 


- 


- 


150 


3,387 

_2 


495 

_2 


- 


- 


- 


10 


10 


- 


- 


21 


691 


574 


- 


_2 


73 


2,512 


508 


- 


_2 


88 


21,478 


64 


- 


~ 


43 


805 
564 


805 

_2 


_ 


1 

3 
3 


5 

146 

6 


10 
4,190 
59 7 
46 
14 


_2 

46 


8 
18 


- 


8 


8,140 


1,546 


217 


- 


1 


50 


- 


- 


- 


3 


_ 


- 


_ 



139 

200 

800 

73 

675 

102 
319 

403 



800 

26 

675 



55 



34 



6 Report for 5 months. 



6 Report for 8 months. 



Membership. 



86 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of PrivaU 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston— Cora. 
Hand and Hand Ladies Society of Mattapan, Inc., 800 

Morton St., Mattapan ..... 
Harriet Tubman House, Inc., 25 Holyoke St. 
Harry E. Burroughs Newsboys Foundation, Inc., Tl ■ 

10 Somerset St 

Hebrew Free Loan Society, The, 532 Warren St., Roxbury 
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The, 43 Tremont St, 
Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association of Roxbury, 646 

Warren St., Roxbury 

Hebrew Ladies' Moshev Zekainlm Association, 21 Queen 

St., Dorchester 

Hebrew Sheltering Home Association of Roxbury, 532 

Warren St., Roxbury . 
Hebrew Women's Sewing Society, 24 Province St. 1 
Hecht Neighborhood House Incorporated, 160 American 

Legion Highway, Dorchester .... 
Helena Dudley Foundation .... 

Helping Hand Sisters Association of East Boston Inc., The 
Helping Hand Society "Dania" .... 
Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society, Boston, Fulda 

and Ellis Sts., Roxbury ..... 
Home for Aged- Colored Women, The, 22 Hancock St. 
Home for Aged Couples, 2055 Columbus Ave., Roxbury 
Home for Aged Men, 133 West Springfield St. 
Home for Aged Women, 205 South Huntington Ave. 
Home for Destitute Catholic Children, 788 Harrison Ave 
Home for Italian Children, Inc., 1125 Centre St., Jamaica 

Plain 

Home for Jewish Children 1 

Home Makers Association of Massachusetts, 30 Hunting 

ton Ave. ....... 

Hope Rescue Mission, Inc., 554 Massachusetts Ave. x 
Household Nursing Association, The, 222 Newbury St 
House of the Angel Guardian, Trustees of the, 11 Perkins 

St., Jamaica Plain 

House of the Good Shepherd, 841 Huntington Ave. 

Howard Benevolent Society, 14 Beacon St. . 

Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

The, 1 Court St 

Hunt Asylum for Destitute Children . 

Huntington Institute for Orphan Children, The . 

Independent Zviller Free Loan Association, Inc. . 

Industrial Aid Society, 35 Chardon St. 6 

Industrial Defense Association, Inc., The, 136 Federal St, 

Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed Children 

The, 241 St. Botolph St 

Industrial School for Girls, 232 Centre St., Dorchester 
Infants Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave. (50 beds) . 
Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The, 424 

Dudley St., Roxbury (See also Somerville) 
International Institute of Boston, Inc., 190 Beacon St. 6 
Isaac Alberts Memorial Aid Association 1 
Italian Legion Auxiliary, Boston Unit Number One 
Jacoby Club of Boston, The, 168 Dartmouth St. . 
Jamaica Plain Dispensary, 26 South St., Jamaica Plain 
Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association, 276 

Amory St., Jamaica Plain .... 
Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association . 
Jewish Big Brother Association of Boston, 6 North 

Russell St. . . . . 

Jewish Children's Aid Society of Boston 7 . 
Jewish Child Welfare Association, 6 North Russell St. 
Jewish Ministers Cantors Association of New England 
Jewish Tuberculosis Sanatorium of Massachusetts x 
Jewish Vocational Aid Society .... 
Jewish Young Women's Social Group, Inc., 800 Morton 

St., Dorchester ...... 

John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the Benefit and 

Support of Aged Poor Persons, and of Orphans and De- 
serted Children, Trustees of, 43 Hawkins St. 
John Howard Industrial Home, The 
John H. Storer Student Loan Fund, Incorporated 
Joseph Herman Trust Fund, Inc., The 
Judge Baker Guidance Center, 38 H Beacon St. . 
Junior League of Boston, Inc., The, Zero Marlborough St 

Keith Fund, Inc 

Kfar Debian Society, Inc. . 



$473 
14,001 


$429 
4,938 


$1,052 

777 


505,151 

20,897 

1,036 


50,044 
8,444 
5,313 


814 

242,279 

1,172 


8,469 


1.629 


31,358 


872,710 


89,079 


55,277 



None. 



No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



13,395 
3,185 


15,663 
1,260 


2,105 
66 


363 


95 


38 


46 


- 


45 

296,066 

2,465,435 

1,315,395 

2,505,739 

882,656 


1,230 
1,092 
52 
3,057 
4,345 
7,267 


4,455 

89 

17,692 

750 

18,741 


11,062 
93488 
49,775 
72,157 
28.326 


173,741 


5,337 


13,952 


253 


3 


420 


- 


- 


129,222 


8,074 


26,734 


467 


569,007 
957,043 
548,636 


22,245 

3,930 

100 


52,338 
71,907 


462 
14,573 


343,377 

65,361 

227,020 

36 

80,245 

20 


100 

51,349 

6,485 


516 
3,652 


16,776 
3,276 
10,649 

4,362 


2,175,584 
218,847 
810,084 


3,312 

2,152 

25,662 


687 
635 


69,710 

8,084 

29,735 


111,223 
296 


21,416 
3,085 


889 


- 


849 

2,561 

53,827 


201 
3,620 


752 
389 


37 
1,720 


29,488 
2,450 


6,360 
1,711 


232 
4,055 


89 
9 


- 


4,875 


- 


- 


25 


81,986 
25 


3,462 
175 


- 


1,470 


• 1,309 


709 


25 


288 


105 


802 


- 


216,296 

121,913 

5,343 

10,669 

396,405 

99,294 

237,994 

147 


35 

38,046 
35,894 

154 


304 

1,390 
17,897 

154 


7,641 

6,695 

77 

70 

10,044 

11,955 


8 Membership. 


* Not stated. 





Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



87 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service oh Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



- 


$1,481 


$1,263 


$5 


1 


- 


98 


98 


- 


5,751 


5,490 


424 


- 


1 


927 


400 


_ 


32,866 


35,138 


16,564 


_ 


40 


1,290 


424 


983 


251,841 


249,035 


7,068 


1 


4 


2,121 


2,121 


100 


6,586 


5,877 


4,330 


1 


2 


12,624 


12,624 


- 


33,080 


30,386 


1,000 


- 


2 


- 


- 


5,229 


143,564 


103,387 


27,778 


- 


40 


238 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


219 


219 


3,000 a 


18,132 


17,762 


11,120 


_ 


122 


3,853 3 


_4 


- 


331 


311 


- 


- 


- 


50 


~ 


- 


85 


84 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


5,685 


5,715 


1,434 


_ 


4 


42 


4 


— 


12,233 


12,299 


3,088 


— 


7 


67 


67 


12,780 


123,713 


81,133 


25,398 


2 


27 


132 


- 


2,030 


56,290 


67,634 


22,073 


1 


24 


152 


107 


29,566 2 


95,473 


107,580 


29,364 


2 


38 


243 


— 


34,718 


70,311 


64,085 


18,458 


- 


25 


1,726 


1,726 


- - 


19,544 


18,437 


4,080 


- 


10 


121 


79 


- 


420 


420 


- 


- 


- 


114 


114 


- 


35,277 


28,293 


14,354 


- 


29 


2,806 


125 


5,692 


80,739 


80,305 


9,305 


_ 


7 


325 


166 


5,192 


81,030 


82,732 


14,989 


— 


10 


732 


342 


- 


14,673 


30,866 


2,225 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- ' 


16,776 


15,093 


8,996 


, - 


15 


6 


6 


- 


3,276 


2,870 


225 


1 


1 


216 


216 


- 


10,649 


10,503 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


616 


495 


25 


1 


— 


— 


— 


12 


58,376 


58,503 


19,529 


— 


10 


4,341 


4,341 


— 


6,485 


6,368 


4,160 


1 


1 


— 


— 


1,000 2\ 

58,839 / 
















132,549 


73,432 


42,402 


- 


57 


149 


149 


— 


10,876 


11,458 


4,651 


— 


5 


29. 


18 


- 


50,397 


61,492 


2,300 


- 


17 


759 


5 


25,846 


47,443 


64,580 


_ 


_ 


_ 


249 


249 


- 


3,975 


4,220 


2,979 


- 


5 


425 


_4 


_ 


992 


1,239 


_ 


_ 


_ 


21 


21 


- 


3,620 


3,951 


2,200 


1 


1 


305 


305 


- 


2,110 


1,967 


1,350 


- 


2 


7,855 


7,855 


- 


6,682 


6,463 


4,535 


_ 


3 


1,489 


1,149 


- 


5,776 


5,678 


- 


- 


- 


138 


_4 


- 


4,875 


4,875 


4,264 


- 


3 


301 


301 


250 


85,699 


82,018 


15,018 


_ 


11 


299 


_ 


- 


200 


189 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


500 


2,543 


2,229 


- 


- 


- 


_4 


_4 


- 


907 


888 


- 


- 


- 


-4 


_4 


_ 


7,641 


11,495 


_ 


_ 


_ 


65 


65 


— 


6,730 


6,581 


2,400 


— 


1 


793 


793 


- 


382 


473 


- 


— 


— 


31 


31 


- 


118 


750 


- 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


49,482 


54,862 


47,880 


- 


20 


1,010 


946 


- 


54,588 


57,751 


10,619 


1 


9 


— 


— 


- 


11,955 


11,190 


1,650 


2 


— 


8 


8 


- 


308 


160 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



27 



523 



18 



^Report for 15 months. 



6 Report for 4 months. 



Name changed to Jewish Vocational Aid Society. 



88 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



'total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends. 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Boston — Con. 

1 Ladies Auxiliary to L, 6th, and Third Battalion, 372d In- 

fantry, Massachusetts National Guard, Inc. . . $17 

2 Ladies Helping Hand Home for Jewish Children, 35 

Chestnut Hill Ave., Brighton ..... 31,530 

3 Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts . . - 

4 Ladies' Unity Club, 18 Melville Ave., Dorchester . 123,488 

5 Lawrence Avenue Free Loan Association, 47 Lawrence 

Ave., Roxbury 1 . 

6 League of Women for Community Service, 558 Massachu- 

setts Ave. 11,527 

7 Lend A Hand Society, 101 Tremont St. 135,763 

8 Lincoln House Association, 80 Emerald St. . . . 456,482 

9 Little House, Inc., The, 73 A St., South Boston . . 7,823 

10 Lord's Day League of New England, 88 Tremont St. . 98,056 

11 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of, 619 Wash- 

ington St. (See below) . . . 

12 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Agricultural Fund) 535,756 

13 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Dumb Animal Fund) 305,133 

14 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Educational Fund) ...... 25,900 

15 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Fund for Aiding Discharged Convicts) . . 103,280 

16 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Hospital Fund) 51,441 

17 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Lotta 

Theatrical Fund) 102,797 

18 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (Mary 

A. Crabtree Fund) 106,519 

19 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (World 

War Veterans Fund No. 1) 2,240,759 

20 Lotta M. Crabtree, Trustees Under the Will of (World 

War Veterans Fund No. 2) 21,408 

21 Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten Alumnae Association, In- 

corporated, The, 100 Riverway .... 29,805 

22 Lutheran Board of Missions, Inc. .... 3,567 

23 Lutheran Immigrant Board, Boston, Massachusetts, Inc., 

The, 9 Henry St., East Boston 3 .... 20,211 

24 Marie Dewing Faelton Charitable Association, Inc., 30 

Huntington Ave. ....... 22,245 

25 Martinist Home, The, 5 Mt. Pleasant Place, Roxbury . 1,142 

26 Masonic Education and Charity Trust, 51 Boylston St. 1,985,553 

27 Massachusetts Association for Occupational Therapy, 

Inc., 554 Columbus Ave. l 

28 Massachusetts Association for Promoting the Interests 

of the Adult Blind 242,074 

29 Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society, 88 Tremont St. 1 

30 Massachusetts Baptist Convention, 15 Ashburton Place. 1,203,272 

31 Massachusetts Branch of National Association on Indian 

Affairs, Inc 110 

32 Massachusetts Branch of the International Order of The 

King's Daughters and Sons, The, 14 Beacon St. . 48,809 

33 Massachusetts Branch of the Shut In Society Inc., The . 5,719 

34 Massachusetts Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary to the 

National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church 

in the United States of America, The, 1 Joy St. . 38,220 

35 Massachusetts Catholic Woman's Guild . . . 2,075 

36 Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society, The . . 67,468 

37 Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Summer Street 

Fire Fund) 64,535 

38 Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, 111 

Huntington Ave. 1,050,193 

39 Massachusetts Charitable Society, The . . 219,624 

40 Massachusetts Child Council, Incorporated, 41 Mt. 

Vernon St. . 1,266 

41 Massachusetts Civic League, 3 Joy St. ... 206 

42 Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society, The . 285,008 

43 Massachusetts Congregational Conference and Mission- 

ary Society, 14 Beacon St 1,831,778 

44 Massachusetts Department of the Ladies of the Grand 

Army of the Republic 123 

45 Massachusetts Division of the International Sunshine 

Society, The . 

46 Massachusetts Elks Scholarship, Inc. .... 19,675 

47 Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles St. 

(219 beds) . . 2,421,030 



$219 
5,416 
2,251 



5,194 
2,962 
12,902 
6,939 
1,645 



1,170 
10,378 



5,730 

35,352 

927 



$26 

8,169 

89 



1,874 

1,083 

100 

835 



7,157 



367 

2,474 
29 



2,595 



$2,581 



5,456 
23,820 



18,126 
28,964 
1,179 
5,053 
2,426 
4,711 
5,221 
97,635 
1,219 



952 

2,433 

81,642 



48,148 



3,511 
1,185 


8,389 


94 
144 


1,017 

3,972 

25 


102 
322 
178 


1,639 

42 

2,256 


- 


- 


2,901 


289 

75 


- 


105,005 
9,340 


15,752 

10,749 

100 


5 

188 


15,746 


64,782 


400 


68,247 


428 


313 


- 


1,000 


450 


690 


45,761 


341,177 


74,645 


The Lutheran Seamen's Board, Inc. 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 














39 




Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 






$246 


$252 












2 


1 


i 


- 


13,586 


12,811 


$4,676 


- 


8 


94 


91 


- 


- 


2 


$3,544 


8,466 


5,754 


2,026 


: 


4 


11 


- 


- 


- 


3 

4 

c 


3,992 
300 

700 


7,111 

13,494 

37,122 

7,775 

6,060 


7,516 

10,493 

36,836 

7,982 

9,681 


1,177 
3,920 
27,332 
5,837 
6,920 


1 


3 
3 

24 
4 
4 


41,925 

324 

1,129 

_2 


29,336 
324 

_2 
_2 


2,882 
6 


17 

172 

3 


6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 

12 


- 


25,283 


24,443 


1,604 


3 


2 


82 


82 


- 


- 


- 


28,964 


27,925 


2,039 


3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


29 


13 


- 


1,179 


1,148 


102 


3 


2 


4 


4 


- 


- 


14 


- 


5,053 


5,125 


407 


3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


8 


15 


- 


2,426 


2,711 


212 


3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


4 


16 


- 


4,711 


4,194 


387 


3 


2 


34 


34 


15 


1 


17 


- 


5,221 


5,214 


417 


3 


2 


1,251 


1,251 


721 


- 


18 


- 


117,718 


138,698 


13,290 


3 


2 


284 


284 


2,068 


- 


19 


- 


1,219 


1,157 


72 


3 


- 


12 


12 


85 


- 


20 


- 


1,537 
10,413 


1,712 
10,329 


200 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


5 
21 


21 
22 


- 


4,728 


5,210 


746 


2 


2 


216 


43 


- 


- 


23 


76,320 * 


1,016 

2,438 

81,769 


953 

2,399 

67,821 


996 
2,080 


^ 


1 
1 


21 
4 

85 


21 

4 

85 


18 


- 


24 
25 
26 

27 


11,124 4 


17,961 
83,500 


17,113 
93,132 


3,610 
10,199 


2 


10 
9 


1,025 

_2 


_2 
_2 


. - 


- 


28 
29 
30 


{ '£'} 


927 


951 


- 


- 


- 


1,000 


1,000 


120 


1 


31 


12,047 
1,329 


11,626 
1,484 


1,977 
480 


- 


12 

1 


288 

_2 


17 

_2 


- 


1 


32 
33 


- 


2,821 
4,337 
2,459 


3,145 
5,068 
2,129 


150 


2 


- 


" 


" 


- 


10 
22 


34 
35 
36 


- 


2,901 


1,434 


150 


2 


- 


6 


6 


- 




37 


- 


105,294 
9,415 


105,287 
6,564 


36,915 
400 


1 
2 


30 


27 
5 


27 
5 


_ 




38 
39 


_ 


15,757 
10,938 
15,846 


15,465 
11,130 
16,502 


10,893 

7,429 

300 


1 
1 
2 


5 
3 


58 


58 


- 




10 
11 

42 


1,640 


129,240 


149,778 


26,382 


3 


13 


- 


- 


- 


7 


13 


- 


741 


618 


53 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


14 


- 


2,140 


1,436 


- 


- 


- 


12 


12 


- 




15 

16 


32,6154 


436,085 


438,840 


242,806 


- 


204 


7,273 


271 


- 




17 



4 Restricted to capital. 



90 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Nauk and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



40 



Boston — Con. 

Massachusetts General Hospital, The, Fruit St., Boston 
(Includes McLean Hospital, Belmont) (1,001 beds) 

Massachusetts Girl Scouts, Incorporated, 87 Beacon St. 

Massachusetts Home, 65 Deaconess Rd. 

Massachusetts Housing Association Incorporated, 89 
Shawmut Ave. ....... 

Massachusetts League of Girls' Clubs, Incorporated, 264 
Boylston St. ...... 

Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital (not in operation) 

Massachusetts Maternity and Foundling Hospital Corpora- 
tion (not in operation) 

Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals, 750 Harrison Ave. (31 
beds) .... ... 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, Inc., 43 Evergreen St 
Jamaica Plain (31 beds) ..... 

Massachusetts Prison Association, 1101 Barristers Hall 

Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund Association 
Incorporated 

Massachusetts Rural Communities, Inc. 

Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged Prisoners, 40 
Pemberton Square . . 

Massachusetts Society for Social Hygiene, Incorporated, 80 
Boylston St 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals, 180 Longwood Ave. .... 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children, 43 Mt. Vernon St 

Massachusetts Society for the University Education of 
Women ........ 

Massachusetts State Firemens Association 

Massachusetts Teachers' Federation, 15 Ashburton Place 

Massachusetts Tents Building Christian and Charitable 
Association for Women Under the Jurisdiction of the 
Eastern District No. 3, The, 560 Columbus Ave. . 

Massachusetts Trustees of the International Committee of 
Young Men's Christian Associations for Army and Navy 
Work (Incorporated) The, 7 City Sq., Charlestown 

Massachusetts Tuberculosis League Inc., 80 Boylston St. . 

Massachusetts Veterans Association, Inc. l 

Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temperance Union Inc., 
302 Marlborough St. 

Massachusetts Woman's Home Missionary Union, 14 
Beacon St. 

Massachusetts Women's Hospital, The, 53 Parker Hill Ave., 
Roxbury (62 beds) 

Master Fishermen's Charitable Association 

Maverick Dispensary of East Boston, 18 Chelsea St. 7 

Merrimac Mission, Incorporated, The, 107 Staniford St. . 

Merwin Memorial Free Clinic for Animals, Inc., 542 
Cambridge St. . 

Michael Anagnos Schools ...... 

Morgan Memorial Co-operative Industries and Stores, Inc., 
The, 89 Shawmut Ave 

Mount Pleasant Home, The, 301 South Huntington Ave. . 

National Association of Goodwill Industries, Inc., 89 
Shawmut Ave. ....... 

National Braille Press Inc., 549 East Fourth St., South 
Boston 

Needle Woman's Friend Society, 229 Berkeley St. . 

New England Anti-Vivisection Society, The, 6 Park St. . 

New Eneland Baptist Hospital, 91 Parker Hill Ave., Rox- 
bury (150 beds) ....... 

New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 581 Boylston 
St 

New England Deaconess Association, 141 Milk St. (See also 
Attleboro, Concord and Natick) .... 

New England Deaconess Hospital, 16 Deaconess Rd. (278 
beds) . .... 

New England Farm and Garden Association Inc., 39 New- 
bury St. ........ 

New Eneland Grenfell Association, 25 Huntington Ave. . 

New Eneland Heart Association . . 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, 161 South Hunt- 
ington Ave. ..... 

New England Hosnital for Women and Children, Dimock 
St., Roxbury (185 beds) 



$22,462,635 

336,757 

93,371 



$219,714 $2,246,838 
7,568 61,703 

4,022 19,760 



734 



$448,954 
5,927 
1,395 



824,065 


- 


1,246 


23,614 


19,619 


791 


8.435 


31 


49,925 
70,282 


235 


480 


1,712 
2,654 


5,269,192 


67,335 


276,762 


194,679 


133,960 
10,479 


250 


69,531 


46 
559 


368 


307 


- 


: 


140,834 


708 


- 


6,470 


19,546 


11,890 


335 


257 


4,088,776 


13,088 


121,233 


141,015 


1,782,288 


124,225 


4,206 


69,449 


54,213 

584 

37,527 


381 

8,648 

10,500 


441 
13,406 


1,807 
356 



No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



609,656 
23,928 


14,762 
29,310 


31,597 
6,878 


586 
672 


60,936 


5,117 


3,546 


2,083 


216,092 


250 


- 


10,080 


50,441 

13,689 

16,383 

1,780 


884 
10,450 
15,334 
2,894 


61,531 
7,790 


2,874 

278 

312 

14 


60,700 
220,169 


1,150 


795 


2,395 
8,432 


1,379,201 
368,498 


145.740 
9,198 


506,422 

38,884 


12,249 
5,510 


365 


1,001 


- 


- 


18,451 

55,603 

128,358 


19,718 

253 

1,282 


2,612 
20 


87 
4,713 
4,532 


1,402,853 


5,645 


278,493 


7,297 


31,385 


42,755 


- 


- 


198,308 


1,999 


8,903 


827 


2,614,977 


100,619 


561,091 


15,280 


40,021 

532,747 

776 


3,556 

25,835 

628 


28,012 

911 

5 


1,058 
20,062 


1,795,259 


35,540 


18,361 


73,108 


1,627,379 


58,769 


172,238 


35.161 


3 Membership. 


4 Not stated. 





>t. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



91 



Continued. 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 






Families 




Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


zations 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





2,100 

34,999 2\ 

4,838 j 



$3,107,215 $2,942,936 $1,721,961 
75,199 70,387 21,669 

25.177 24,070 6,366 



24,860 


21,533 


11,700 


10,088 


10,109 


3,050 


1,712 
5,469 


523 

7,028 


_ 


543,616 


554,986 


284,200 


69,577 
809 


75,815 
3,938 


29,645 
2,900 



307 



249 



- 


7.178 


4,942 


2.537 


67,956 2 \ 

54,515 / 

6.567 2 \ 

57,623 / 


12,484 
333,243 
250,505 


10,378 
263,794 
221,874 


5,005 
60,450 
170,191 


9.250 2 


2,602 

8,648 

24,262 


2,664 

8,329 

25,020 


2,680 
9,486 



793 



- 


46,946 
36,861 


52,055 
37,691 


28,041 
12,484 


- 


10,747 


11,659 


4.161 


200 


10,530 


12,219 


- 


2,502 


65,987 

10,729 

23,437 

5,410 


73,932 
9,000 

24,234 
3,703 


37,409 

2,830 

13,942 

928 


19,449 21 

31,089 J 

3,812 


4,341 
8,432 

670,051 
57,039 


4,353 
11,265 

668,210 
27,993 


2,579 

123,695 
9,826 


- 


1,001 


792 


- 


35,227 


18,646 

7,579 

41,062 


16,524 
8,828 
10,357 


6,388 
2,993 
4,812 



287,953 



260,754 



- 


42,755 


52,576 


450 


96,798 
46,590 2 \ 
31,736 / 


108,528 
705,282 


21,358 
672,877 


5,049 
341,167 


10,705 2 

14,794 21 
15,325 J 


32,644 

35,158 

633 

142,335 


32,203 

26,374 

453 

150,023 


5,625 

5,286 

101 

76,267 


70, 138 2 


258,407 


272,373 


144,038 


6 Animals. 


6 Attendance. 


7 Re] 



1,432 
26 
13 


32,526 
21,000 s 
79 


1,859 
9 


3 


648 


200 


8 


928 


- 


_ 


20 
21 


20 
21 


342 


48,500 


19.343 


38 

1 


10,373 
290 


1,747 
290 



1 

4 

70 


1,743 


1,743 


~ 


836,660 5 


813.757 6 


- 


91 


17,286 


17.286 


6.812 


1 
2 


27 

260 

2 


27 

_4 

2 


162 



23 192,950 8 
5 



73 

1 

14 

1 


1,065 
90 
11,931 
38,663 6 


60 

90 

_4 
_4 


2 


12,105 5 
49 


9,940 5 

_4 


114 
15 


18,316 
40 


10,801 


17 

2 


6,000 
50 


6,000 
50 



5,008 



- 


1 






- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


473 


8,571 


763 


_ 


5 


_4 




1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


55 


919 


614 


1 


174 


16,958 


2,716 



1.922 



20 



7 Report for 16 months. 



92 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



\ \ui and A.DDBB8B 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Boston Con. 
\<a England Euro Hattin Homes, Westminster, Vermont 
New England Barrage stores for Palestine, Inc., 1423 

\\ tShlngtOI) St. ....... 

New England Watch and Ward Society, The, 41 Mt. 

\ onion St. ....... 

New England Zionist Region . 

Newsboys Reading Room Association of Boston, The 
Nlckerson Home for Children. 125 Townsend St., Roxbury 
Norfolk House Centre. 14 John Eliot Square, Roxbury 
North Bennet street Industrial School, The, 39 North 

Hennet St. . 

North Knd Diet Kitchen, The . . . 

North End Dispensary, 517 Shawmut Ave. 
Norwegian Old r copies Home and Charitable Association 

of Greater Boston, 20 Cushlng Ave., Dorchester . 
Nursery Training School of Boston, The, 147 Ruggles St. 5 
Nutrition Clinics. Incorporated, 290 Commonwealth Ave. 
Oliver Dltson Society for the Relief of Needy Musicians 
Olivia James House, 521 E. Seventh St., South Boston 
Orchard Home School, 31 Mt. Vernon St. 
Order of Sir Galahad. Inc., The, 1 Joy St. 
Order of the Fleur de Lis. Inc., 1 Joy St. 
Ostroa Ladies Helping Hand Society, Inc. 
Overseers of the Public Welfare in the City of Boston, The, 

43 Hawkins St. 

Pan-Albanian Federation of America "Vatra" (The Hearth) 

Inc.. The 

Particular Council Society St. Vincent de Paul of the City 

of Boston, The, 41 Hawkins St. » . . 

Penny Wise Thrift Shop, Inc., The, 235 Huntington Ave. 
Permanent Charity Fund Incorporated, Committee of the, 

100 Franklin St 

Permanent Peace Fund. Trustees of the . 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 721 Huntington Ave. (249 

beds) ........ 

Phineas G. Parmenter Foundation, Inc. . 
Plymouth Hospital Corporation of Boston (not in operation) 
Polish Home of The Little Flower .Inc., Hale St., Hyde Park 
Preachers' Aid Society of the New England Annual Con 

ference of the Methodist Episcopal Church . 
Resthaven Corporation, 120 Fisher Ave., Roxbury . 
Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables, 125 Parker 

Hill Ave., Roxbury (115 beds) .... 
Robert Gould Shaw House, Inc., 11 Windsor St., Roxbury 
Robert Treat Paine Association, The 
Rotch Travelling Scholarship, Inc. 
Roxbury Charitable Society, The 7 ... 

Roxbury Home for Aged Women, 5 Burton Ave., Roxbury 
Roxbury Ladies Aid and Fuel Society, The, 532 Warren St., 

Roxbury ........ 

Roxbury Ladies' Club J ..... 

Roxbury Neighborhood House Association, 858 Albany St 

Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc. 

Rufus F. Dawes Hotel Association, 8 Pine St. 

Rutland Corner House, 453 Shawmut Ave. 

Saint Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses Alumnae Association 

Incorporated ....... 

Saint Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston, 736 Cambridge St 

Brighton (250 beds) 

Saint Joseph's Home, 321 Centre St., Dorchester 

St. Luke's Home for Convalescents, 149 Roxbury St., Rox 

bury 

St. Mark Social Center, Inc., 216 Townsend St., Roxbury 
Saint Mary's Infant Asylum and Lying-in-Hospital, 90 

Cushlng Ave., Dorchester (123 beds) . 
Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Incorporated, The 

East Brookline St 

Sanders Fund, Inc. ...... 

Scandinavian Sailors* Home, Inc., 46 Water St., Charles 

town ........ 

Scientific Temperance Federation, The, 400 Boylston St. 

Scollay Square Service Club (Incorporated) 

Scots Charitable Society, The, 7 Water St. 

Sears and other Funds, Trustees of the . 

Settlements Museum Association, 36 Rutland St. 

Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children 

Simmons Club of Boston 



$57 


$822 


- 


- 


576 


- 


$7,664 


- 


212,368 


2,259 


_ 


$8,668 


77 


2,858 


— 


— 


32,192 


3 


— 


2,790 


33,545 


1,055 


1,721 


912 


230,781 


22,218 


3,447 


1,739 


167,263 


44,782 


8,867 


4,246 


47,048 


3,620 


- 


1,855 


23,934 


- 


- 


- 


82,577 


668 


9,448 


1,540 


28,309 


9,497 


13,153 


151 


538 


2,000 


979 


— 


34,376 


- 


- 


1,010 


20,635 


6,855 


518 


— 


147,102 


10,018 


4,763 


4,745 


420 


1,484 


528 


— 


190 


— 


97 


— 


6 


281 


835 


- 


578,918 


- 


- 


21,114 


45 


1,699 


- 


- 



10,212 



43 



4,962,810 
134,320 


1,200 


~ 


197,689 
5,890 


6,469,138 

3,207 

4,004 

75,104 


106,086 
3,801 


287,802 
3,834 


103,209 
132 

3 


1,019,617 
54,246 


3,496 
5,921 


4,314 


34,287 
192 


1,840,558 
218,011 
115,269 
78,831 
200,438 
421,749 


29,141 
10,498 

6,725 
2,371 


93,859 
138 

1,086 


42,318 
5,610 
7,268 
3,964 
6,253 

17,166 


41 


4,850 


2,706 


- 


64,106 

39,427 

113,857 

109,923 


14,018 
2,000 


9,853 
184 


2.384 
2,686 

3,772 


4,892 


640 


390 


117 


990,865 
68,231 


59,725 
405 


264,921 
14,752 


515 


408,248 
467 


5,186 
1,240 


2,080 


14,691 


270,181 


11,411 


89,330 


1.956 


2,899,896 
250 


383,969 
14,604 


311,818 
274 


- 


6,808 

7,167 

10,895 

81,698 

291,462 

2,650 

597,484 

48 


3,408 
3,547 

360 

1,975 

246 


10,782 
1,111 

51 

53 

518 


293 

353 

4.113 

9,293 

161 

25.763 


Attendance. 


* Restricted to capital 





1 No report. 



2 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



93 













Average 


Service ok Relief Given 


















Current 


Current 


Salaries 


Number 


Number 






Families 






Legacies 


Receipts 


Expendi- 


and 


of Paid 


of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 








tures 


Wages 


Officers 


Em- 
ployees 


Indi- 
viduals 


viduals 
Free 


sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


zations 




„ 


$822 


$1,010 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


7,664 


7,620 


$3,209 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


_ 


10,928 


11,156 


8,296 


1 


5 


_ 


_ 


228 


- 


3 


— 


2,858 


2,888 


395 


- 


_2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


2,793 


2,270 


270 


— 


1 


- 


— 


— 


1 


5 


$200 


3,889 


4,002 


1,496 


- 


4 


40 


12 


— 


— 


6 


500 


27,905 


27,924 


14,379 


- 


49 


5,000 3 


_2 


- 


- 


7 


_ 


54,397 


58,843 


39,822 


_ 


66 


5,006 


4,421 


_ 


3 


8 


5,000* 


5,475 


7,051 


_ 


: 


: 


2,942 


2,942 


_ 


1 


9 
10 


_ 


11,657 


5,052 


795 


3 


2 


41 


2 


_ 


_ 


11 


— 


20,084 


22,065 


11,880 


— 


10 


77 


— 


66 


2 


12 


- 


2,979 


2,709 


1.870 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


— 


1,010 


974 


— 


— 


— 


15 


15 


— 


— 


14 


- 


7,374 


7,378 


5,660 


- 


5 


508 


91 


43 


- 


15 


— 


19,352 


19,006 


9,388 


- 


10 


123 


107 


— 


— 


16 


— 


2,321 


2,226 


1,124 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


— 


97 


106 


— 


— 


— 


1,000 6 


_2 


— 


— 


18 


- 


1,116 


1,114 


50 


1 


1 


_2 


_2 


_2 


4 


19 


- 


21,114 


28,322 


- 


- 


- 


117 


117 


" 


- 


20 


- 


1,829 


1,798 


1.231 


1 


1 


- 


- 


" 


- 


21 


- 


10,256 


10,320 


2,228 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


3 


22 
23 


_ 


198,889 


212,712 


9,600 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


128 


24 


- 


5,890 


5,590 


750 


- 


2 


- 


- 


~ 


1 


25 


4,838 * 


472,686 


546,655 


292,527 


1 


416 


11,883 


1,196 


_ 


_ 


26 


- 


132 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 
28 


~ 


8,514 


6,067 


- 


- 


- 


73 


48 


: 


- 


29 


5,329 


43,112 


43,469 


3,420 


_ 


2 


126 


126 


_ 


_ 


30 


- 


10,428 


8,775 


3,702 


1 


6 


71 


13 


~ 


- 


31 


_ 


167,343 


170,108 


91,255 


1 


127 


1,226 


577 


_ 


_ 


32 


— 


16,351 


18,143 


12,865 


— 


12 


1,584 


400 


750 


12 


33 


— 


7,268 


6,875 


704 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


41 


34 


- 


3,964 


3,978 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


35 


— 


12,979 


12,413 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


376 


2 


36 


- 


20,625 


18,080 


8,120 


1 


9 


24 


- 


- 


- 


37 


- 


7,557 


11,098 


1,455 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1,750 


4 


38 
39 


- 


16,402 


18,656 


13,163 


- 


23 


2,000 « 


1,000 6 


_ 


- 


40 


- 


2,686 


798 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


29 


41 


- 


9,853 


9,970 


6,177 


- 


12 


87,995 8 


- 


- 


- 


42 


- 


5,956 


5,673 


3,055 


- 


4 


519 


346 


- 


35 


43 


50* 


1,118 


541 


50 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


44 


22,700 


347,862 


322,635 


160,414 


_ 


217 


16.849 


3,539 


_ 


_ 


45 


- 


15,157 


14,407 


3,360 


- 


10 


48 


- 


- 


- 


46 


2,500* 


21,957 


21,814 


10,889 


_ 


12 


404 


63 


_ 


_ 


47 


— 


1,448 


1,504 


— 


— 


— 


_2 


_2 


— 


— 


48 


f 15,000 *\ 
\ 4,030 / 






















106,729 


101,058 


47,055 


- 


72 


1.332 


5 


- 


- 


49 


33,152* 


695,788 


693,401 


293,516 


3 


375 


225,380 


92,555 


29,359 


55 


50 


- 


14,878 


14,843 


1,050 


3 


1 


121 


121 


10 


11 


51 


- 


14,191 


7,464 


2,416 


_ 


4 


510 


200 


_ 


_ 


52 


990 


5,942 


6,210 


4,618 


3 


1 


_2 


_2 


- 


- 


53 


— 


353 


486 


480 


— 


1 


— 


- 


— 


- 


54 


- 


4,524 


3,991 


300 


- 


1 


39 


39 


68 


- 


55 


- 


9,293 


9,288 


500 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


4 


56 


— 


2,190 


2,537 


2,120 


— 


3 


_2 


_2 


— 


- 


57 


— 


25,763 


27,657 


4,170 


— 


2 


251 


251 


— 


- 


58 


~ 


764 


745 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


59 



6 Report for 11 months. 



6 Membership. 



7 Report for 15 months. 



8 Census. 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Boston Con. 

sisterhood of Congregation Beth Hamldrash Hagadol, Inc 

sister^ of Lord Beaoonafleld Aid Society, Inc. . 

Sisters of the lUessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored 

People In Massachusetts. Inc.. The. 60 Vernon St. 
Society for Ministerial Relief. 25 Beacon St. . 
Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled Episcopal Clergy 

men ......... 

society for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans of Clergy 

men of the l'rotestant Episcopal Church, 1 Joy St. 
Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home), 125 Highland 

St.. Roxbury (21 beds) 

Sofia American Schools, Inc. ..... 

Solomon M. Hyams Fund, Inc., 49 Federal St. 
South Boston Samaritan Society .... 

South End Day Nursery, The, 25 Dover St. . 

South End Day Nursery Auxiliary 

South End Diet Kitchen of Boston, The, 25 Bennet St 

South End House Association, The, 20 Union Park St. 

South End Music School, The, 32 Rutland St. 

Speech Readers Guild of Boston, The, 339 Commonwealth 

Ave. * 



Stearns Fund, Inc. ...... 

Students' Aid Foundation, Incorporated, The . 
Students House Corporation, 96 The Fenway . 
Sunnyslde Day Nursery, The, 16 Hancock St. 
Swedish Home of Peace ("Fridhem"), 169 Townsend St, 

Roxbury • . 

Swiss Benevolent Society ..... 
Syrian Child Welfare Society, Inc., The 1 
Syrian Ladles' Aid Society, The, 44 West Newton St. 
Taadood Melkite Catholic Society of Greater Boston, Inc 

The, 178 Harrison Ave 

Tabernacle Society of Boston, The 

Talitha Cumi Home, The, 215 Forest Hills St., Jamaica 

Plain 

Three-fold Movement — League of Neighbors, Fellowship 

of Faiths, Union of East and West (Incorporated), The 1 
Thrift Shop of Boston, Inc., The, 90 Huntington Ave. 
Travelers Aid Society of Boston, Inc., 481 South Station 
Trinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel Allen Memorial) 

135 South Huntington Ave. .... 

Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery, 406 Meridi 

an St., East Boston ...... 

Union Rescue Mission, The, 1 Dover St. 

Unitarian Foundation, Inc., 25 Beacon St. 

Unitarian Service Pension Society, The, 25 Beacon St. 

Vernon Advent Christian Home Inc., South Vernon, Ver 

mont ........ 

Veterans' Charitable Legal Association, Inc., 619 Washing 

ton St 

Village Club, Inc., The, 316 Huntington Ave. » 

Vincent Memorial Hospital, The, 125 South Huntington 

Ave. (21 beds) 

Volunteers of America, Inc. of Massachusetts, 25 Hanover 

St." . . 

Washingtonlan Home, 41 Waltham St. . 

Wells Memorial Association, 985 Washington St. 

West End House Alumni Association, Inc., 16 Blossom St, 

West End House, Inc., The, 16 Blossom St. . 

West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Association, The 

West End Young Mens Hebrew Association, 165 Cambridge 

St 

Westminster Foundation, Inc. x 

Widows' Society in Boston ..... 

William Lawrence Camp, Inc. .... 

Winchester Home for Aged Women 

Wolfboro Chpritable Fund Inc. 1 . 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society 

Womans Auxiliary of the New England Baptist Hospital 

Woman's Board of Missions, 14 Beacon St. 

Woman's Charity Club, The, 53 Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury 

Woman's Home Missionary Society of the New England 

Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church 1 . 
Woman's Seaman's Friend Society .... 

Woman's Universalist Missionary Society of Massachusetts, 

The. 16 Beacon St 



$477 
672 



83.444 
388,751 



237,000 
237,277 



3,871 
4,527 



3.000 



$1,322 
837 

1.792 



$16,723 



9.600 



67,434 

723,199 

,549,743 

1,000 

78,931 

10,304 

53,323 

379,146 

37,339 


6,143 
3.483 

11 

3,839 

320 

4,368 

23,209 

4,883 


2,353 
158,994 

453 
3,433 

7,959 
6,554 


2,310 

19,300 

85,700 

35 

2,293 

244 

3.261 

7,286 

11 


4,320 

31,560 

115.500 

46,661 


8,478 
6,000 


3,280 
2,028 
_s 

1,081 


911 
_6 

876 


12,001 
2,960 


204 
154 


1,451 


80 


18,154 


444 


2,112 


- 


191 
465 


21 
1,662 


1,164 


- 


304,907 


22,522 


4,055 


- 


4,402 
34.036 


18,704 


17,830 
1,461 


1,214 


183,560 


4,318 


6,635 


5,952 


24,303 
84,565 


9,012 
9,916 


366 


233 
220 


648,064 


8,921 


- 


26 


391,122 


6,591 


3,052 


1,081 


- 


712 


547 


- 


640,977 


19,894 


7,829 


27,273 


47,000 

127,657 

62,557 

1,424 

583,765 

170 


59,158 

2,000 

9,072 

880 

277 

897 


53,175 
13,945 
7,356 

4,742 
160 


3.330 
14,145 


3,266 


- 


1,242 


- 


321,744 
28,158 


4,717 
1,491 


159 
8,322 


13,199 


40,325 

81 

448,240 

374,182 


679 

1,065 

11,715 

3,049 


194 
44 

956 


1,516 
14,588 


14,984 


1,238 


17 


487 


55,675 


4,375 


- 


2,820 



- None. ' No report, 

for the Hard of Hearing. 



2 Not stated. 



3 Restricted to capital. 



4 Name changed to Boston Guild 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



95 



Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 

S1V3 of 

Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$4,183 3 



75 3 



10,800 



834 



8,000 8 



10,480 



201 



$2,010 
837 


$1,872 
433 


- 


5.865 
17,650 


6,741 
18,995 


$840 
200 


8,980 


13,331 


- 


12,600 


11,616 


- 


10,807 

182,371 

85,700 

46 

17,386 

3.999 

7,629 

38,586 

11,448 


10,609 

193,616 

93,651 

46 

7,113 

2,891 

6,590 

43,892 

, 12,194 


3,902 
72,062 
31,933 

4,068 

25.654 
9,666 


11,758 
2,940 


10,511 
4.565 




7,958 


8,508 


4,926 


1,656 
234 


1.667 
285 


1,100 


2,556 


2,373 


232 


21 

2,827 


45 
3,205 


_ 



27,453 



26,978 



37,497 



44,980 



2,390 2,254 

1,110 1,384 

35,783 35,429 

4,005 3,242 



4.024 
7.195 



1,790 
6,854 



12,903 



501 


17,830 
21,882 


17,556 
21,029 


3,279 
15,196 


■ - 


14,506 


18,223 


7,352 


3,094 


9.611 
13.231 


9,523 
12,214 


6,872 
5,168 


43,058 


52,006 


8,947 


100 


6,744 s 


10,236 


6,812 


2,076 


- 


1,260 


1,260 


- 



112,334 

19,276 

16,428 

880 

19.165 

1,057 


114,024 
22,827 
17,643 

991 
18,993 

996 


24,263 
9,233 
10.196 

10,355 
132 


1,242 


4,070 


- 


18,075 
9,813 


16,637 
8,057 


1,100 
1,574 



249 



1,200 



_2 


1,250 
56 


1,250 
56 


- 


27 


27 


- 


48 


48 


9 
70 
30 

5 


50 

483 

2,511 

94 

70 


28 

2,511 
94 
10 


30 
31 


1,469 

185,364 

382 


1.469 
33 


_5 


63 
27 

_5 


63 


6 


50 


9 


2 


54 


4 



-2 2 2 

_ _2 _2 

19 155 106 



44 
400 



32 



3 

11 


13,643 


13,643 


510 


7 
1.254 


8 


23 


1 


- 


- 


11 
3 


32,780 • 
25,883 


8,195 « 
25,883 


741 
2.653 


7 


2 


80 


80 


- 


- 


3 


22 


4 


- 


- 


- 


1,288 


763 


- 


26 


22 


310 


149 


- 


- 


40 
10 
23 


_2 

690 
1,500 


_2 

12 


- 


- 


18 


1,100 


300 


358 


- 


- 


200 « 


_2 


- 


- 


1 

_2 


96 
136 


96 
6 


- 


- 



6 Reported under Boston Students Union — Students House Corporation, 
months. 8 Membership. 



8 Attendance. 



'Report for 14 



96 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Huston — Con. 
1 Women's Educational and industrial Union, 264 Boyiston 


J \\ union's Kducntional and Industrial Union, Trustees of 
the- 

;? Women's Municipal League Committees, Incorporated, 3 
Joy st 

1 Women's Palestine Agricultural Association Inc. (The 
Ptlagrass) l ....... 

E Women's Scholarship Association 2 . 

r> women's Service Club of Boston, 464 Massachusetts Ave. 

7 Wood Memorial Home, Inc. ...... 

B Working (".iris Home, The, 89 Union Park St. 

'.• Young Men's Educational Aid Association, The 

10 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston, 108 Seaver St., 

Koxbury 

1 1 Young Traveller's Aid Society, The . . . . 

12 Young Yigglanese Club of East Boston . 

B OXFORD 

13 Female Charitable Society of West Boxford . 

Braintree 

14 Braintree Visiting Nurse Association . 

15 Braintree Young Men's Christian Association . 

16 Norfolk County Health Association, Inc. 



$7,519 



$450 



10,737 

1,544,066 

303,588 


1,685 
266 


1,521 
62,472 


$95,710 
982 


132,408 
26,713 


10,904 
35 


12,594 


1,053 


189 


14 


161 


- 


406 
1,522 
2,937 


2,160 
16,551 


2,270 


1 
45 



Bridgewater 

17 Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association .... 

Brockton 

18 Brockton Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 86 Main St. 6 

19 Brockton Day Nursery, 39 Everett St 

20 Brockton Girl Scouts, Inc., 152 Main St. ... 

21 Brockton Hospital Company, 680 Centre St. (125 beds) . 

22 Brockton Humane Society, The, 226 Pearl St. 

23 Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational Association, 

Inc. ......... 

24 Brockton Social Service Council, Inc., 196 Main St. 1 

25 Brockton Visiting Nurse Association, 231 Main St. . 

26 Brockton Young Men's Christian Association, The, 320 

Main St. . 

27 Brockton Young Women's Christian Association, 465 Main 

St 

28 Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery, Trustees of the, 

39 Everett St 

29 Family Welfare Association of Brockton, 19 L St. 1 . 

30 Home for Aged Men in the City of Brockton, Trustees of 

the, 892 Belmont St. 

31 Joubeilite Great League Incorporated .... 

32 Pettee-Chace Scholarship Fund 

33 Pilgrim Foundation, The, 1106 Main St. ... 

34 Plymouth County Health Association, Inc., 106 Main St. 

35 Wales Home for Aged Women, The, 553 North Main St. . 

36 Woman's Club of Brockton 

Broofline 

37 Arleen Grandberg Memorial 1 

38 Brookline Council of Girl Scouts, Inc 

39 Brookline Friendly Society, The 

40 Brooks Hospital (41 beds) 

41 Christian Science Benevolent Association, The (146 beds) . 

42 Free Hospital for Women (101 beds) .... 

43 Jewish Women's Convalescent Home Association 1 . 

Cambridge 

44 Ames Foundation 

45 Avon Home, The, 1000 Massachusetts Ave. . 

46 Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed Charitable 

Loan Association, 178 Elm St. . 

47 Cambridge Community Center, Inc., 49 Howard St. 

48 Cambridge Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc., 18 Brattle 

St .... 

49 Cambridge Girl Scouts, Inc., 1234 Massachusetts Ave. 

50 Cambridge Hebrew Women's Aid Society, The 

51 Cambridge Homes for Aged People, 360 Mt. Auburn St. . 



13,071 



740 



9,216 

24,390 

6,364 

976,229 

9,640 


5,268 

1,627 

1,418 

27,786 

120 


5,398 
804 

4,253 

187,953 

121 


1,201 

15 

16,086 

1.662 


237 


10 


140 


- 


54,976 


9,235 


13,339 


1,203 


526,178 


9,822 


36,811 


15,090 


197,600 


12,742 


5,143 


2,539 


20.633 


- 


- 


406 



237,511 



4,828 



4,247 

1,006,084 

1,145 

165,096 

29,349 


50 

9,687 

466 

4,723 


4,839 
480 
610 


14 
44,370 

9,573 
912 


239 

127,864 
255,385 


1,470 
16,374 
6,000 


819 

4,812 

97,053 


5,943 
295 


1,534,890 


138,718 


197,552 


8,349 


3,078,901 


36,844 


51,055 


106,130 


14,524 
359,019 


3,566 


11 
3,010 


451 
14,970 


614 
542 


626 
5,424 


13,218 
250 


- 


16,591 

6,536 

902 


6,611 
2,502 
1,494 


11,144 
2,067 


15 


819,333 


2,425 


6,246 


25,603 


3 Membership. 


4 Not stated 


6 Visits. 



None. 



1 No report. 



Report not due. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



97 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



56,000 ' 
63,238 



$7,969 



3,206 
95,710 
63,454 



1,053 
35 



$7,924 



2,928 

3,701 

62,374 

266 

19,570 

1.000 

35 



73 



2,878 



97,513 



$2,490 



653 

19,679 



4.433 


4,559 


3,148 


45 


— 


- 


16.551 


15,319 


3,342 



1,833 



$32,759^ 


11,177 

3,633 

5,686 

231,826 

1,903 


10,278 

3,470 

5,794 

235,709 

1.761 


3,028 

1,751 

684 

97,564 

1,260 


- 


150 


200 


- 


16.518 


40,296 


25,228 


22,974 


- 


67,169 


67,034 


39,400 


- 


24,064 


20,796 


12,324 


- 


406 


405 


_ 



1,862 



2,639 
5,000 


64 
44,370 
14,526 
13,160 
11,246 


404 

41,786 

14,357 

9,581 

7,825 


2,080 
2,799 
4,849 


4,340 

48 n 

12,048 J 
22,500 7 \ 
45,930 / 


2,290 
31,471 
103,349 

356,668 

240,921 


2,248 
27,870 
96,116 

367,700 

196,189 


1,055 

22,437 
51,990 

299,887 

83,013 


800 


462 
22,349 


75 
24,541 


11,778 


- 


13,845 
5,674 


13,361 
5,184 


198 
2,591 


— 


6,615 
13,676 
3,562 


7,078 
12,980 
3,262 


4,294 
3,401 



10,992 



784 



2 


446 


432 


260 


- 


34 


1,313 


210 


2,850 


- 


- 


181 


181 


21 


9 


9 


1,903 3 


_4 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 



997 
110 

2,585 5 



378 
110 

194 5 



1 


_ 


1 
3,435 


i 
3,435 


- 


2 


6,099 


6,099 


1 


5 


18 


- 


~~ 


" 


232 


228 




2 


3313 




1 


19 


3,163 


1,792 


1 


53 


982 


- 


1 


204 


3,727 


128 


_4 


93 


14,943 


14,552 



59 



25 



1 

5 

2 

108 

2 


1,400 3 

230 

515 

8,689 

3,004 8 


_4 

852 

_4 


- 


6 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


14 


4,717 


565 


- 


- 


20 


4,572 


2,482 


500 


75 


9 


4,514 


1,806 


7 


12 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 



687 
8 



8 


404 


183 


288 


5 


208 
358 


208 
302 


182 


2 

2 


546 3 
725 3 


_4 
_4 


- 



8 Name changed to Squanto Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America. 



7 Restricted to capital. 



ft 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Addhkss 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



CaMUKIDOE Con. 



Cambridge Hospital. 330 Mt. Auburn St. (238 beds) 

Cambridge Neighborhood House, 79 Moore St. 

Cambridge-port Fruit and Flower Mission, The 

Cambridge Hotary Educational Fund Inc. 

Cambridge Tuberculosis and Health Association, 689 
Massachusetts Ave. ...... 

Cambridge Visiting Nursing Association, The. 35 Bigelow 
st 

Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association, 820 Massa- 
chusetts Ave. ....... 

Cambridge Young Women's Christian Association, The 
Temple St 

East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 105 Spring 
st 

Ella Lyman Cabot Foundation, 101 Brattle St. 

Family Welfare Society of Cambridge, The, 763 Massa 
chusetts Ave. ....... 

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau ..... 

Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables, The, 1575 Cambridge 
St. (214 beds) 

Howard Benevolent Society of Cambridge, 763 Massachu- 
setts Ave. ....... 

Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc., 67 Fourth St. (31 
beds) 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum, 45 Guyette Rd. 

Tide Over League, Inc., 1400 Massachusetts Ave. . 

United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies of God, Inc 
59 Moore St 

Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The 



Canton 
Canton Hospital and Nursing Association 
Canton Playgrounds Association, The 



Chatham 
22 Chatham Visiting Nurse Association, Incorporated 



Chelsea 

Chebra Kadisha of Chelsea 

Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home, 148 Shawmut 

St 

Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Loan Association, The . 
Chelsea Hebrew Sheltering Home, 75 Ash St. . 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital, 100 Bellingham St. (79 beds) 6 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, Inc., The 
Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association, 207 Shurtleff 

St 

Chevra Bikur Cholim of Chelsea .... 
Chevra Thilim & Gemilath Chesed Association, Inc. of 

Chelsea x . 
Community Aid Association of Chelsea, Massachusetts * 
Hebrew Free Loan Association of Chelsea, 109 Third St. 
Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association . 
Liberty Free Loan Association 7 . . . . 

Mishner Free Loan Association .... 
Old Ladies Home Association of Chelsea, Massachusetts, 3 

Nichols St. 



Clinton 

38 Clinton District Nursing Association, Inc. 

39 Clinton Home for Aged People, The 

40 Clinton Hospital Association, The (65 beds) . 

41 Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association 

42 Wanocksett Girl Scout Camp, Inc., The 

Cohasset 

43 Beechwood Improvement Association, Incorporated, The 

44 Bonnie Bairns Association ..... 

45 Cohasset Horse Show Association, Inc. . 

46 Sandy Beach Association ..... 

Concord 

47 Concord Female Charitable Society, The 

48 Concord, Massachusetts, Girl Scouts, Incorporated, The 

49 Concord's Home for the Aged .... 



,051,110 
40,009 

1,388 
179 


$11,133 

4,150 

196 


$260,419 

1,152 

17 


$35,228 

1,588 

41 

4 


15,740 


13,901 


444 


628 


66,447 


6,211 


9,104 


2,343 


439,848 


20,041 


73,463 


6,269 


262,205 


21,389 


35,414 


5,140 


44,778 
1,640 


5,464 
2,000 


1,080 


317 


47,571 
112 


35,783 
293 


337 
42 


2,308 


873,280 


9,999 


102,160 


1,709 


8,804 


' " 


- 


258 


154,063 

511,733 

6 


778 
1,485 


22,307 
11,767 
4,236 


564 


3,022 
66 


993 
2,842 


- 


- 


8,369 


2,548 


1,464 


543 



19.861 



24,148 



1,715 



61 



239 



722 



10 



48,961 

883 

2,649 

222,607 

473 


533 
274 
469 
103 
195 


1,825 
9,632 

77,261 
290 


347 

1,352 

7 


160,064 
837 


4,423 
2,017 


6,706 


— 


297 

1,185 

175 

956 


422 

5,201 

91 

1,199 


25,322 

2,864 
8,038 


" 


112,914 


131 


- 


4,528 


4,224 
151,445 


162 
363 


3,148 
7,631 


104 

4,289 


400,131 

6,259 

261 


952 
25 


48,436 

57 

988 


9,766 

269 

8 


2,819 

7,369 

20,129 

36,078 


1,190 


524 

2,449 
2,184 


414 


16,444 
25,156 
95,017 


776 
83 


1 

1,526 

290 


548 
4,381 


3 Not stated. 




* Membership. 





No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 





Service ok Relief Given 


Average 










Number 






Families 




of Paid 


Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 


Em- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


zations 


ployees 


viduals 


Free Indi- 










viduals 





536.000 2\ 
2,650 / 


$309,587 

6,952 

252 

4 


$323,050 

7,664 

257 


$158,286 
4,212 


- 


14,974 


14,978 


6,101 


3,000 


20,660 


17,132 


11,214 


10,000 2 


99,774 


99,699 


39,593 


- 


61,944 


65.026 


36,807 


- 


6,861 
2,000 


7,593 
359 


4,915 


2,500 


40,929 
336 


39.879 
547 


12,969 
35 


30,907 


144,776 


131,693 


36,802 


- 


258 


208 


- 


4,647 


23.085 

16,979 

5,776 


25,721 

23,891 

5,797 


12,342 
4,319 
2,565 


- 


993 

2,842 


1,012 

2,787 


2,558 


- 


4,557 
722 


4,086 
591 


2,250 
368 



375 
750 



524 



3,639 
2,598 



4,121 



- 


3,416 


3,077 


100 


12,386 


6,043 


27,500 *\ 
5,380 / 






63,785 


62,518 


— 


1,278 


1,287 


- 


1,022 


1,172 



2,578 
1,827 



1,701 1,209 

1,569 1,223 

5,504 4,237 



1,589 

2,973 
2,437 

26,342 

350 

50 

1,173 



400 
1,334 



236 

_3 


9,898 
362 
290 


4,013 

15 

290 


85 
85 


6 


, 2,079 


2,077 


587 


10 


3,264 


1,440 


- 


45 


7,009 


837 


- 


36 


899* 


_3 


- 


7 


500 


95 


- 


8 
1 


113 

889 


113 

_3 


711 


157 


441 


84 


- 


- 


1 


1 


49 


30 
5 
5 


2,145 
110 
146 


83 

6 

146 


- 



75 



660 



383 



1,965 


2,002 


1,558 


- 


1 


833 » 


285 


3,349 


3,198 


720 


3 


1 


- 


- 


2,706 
9,906 

469 
78,716 

493 


3,470 
9,063 

484 

78,412 

583 


1,426 
232 

34,194 


1 


3 

1 

83 


25 

500 

2,200 

2,720 


25 

2,200 

16 


11,130 
2,017 


10,870 
1,988 


4,903 
207 


1 


6 

1 


597* 
809 


809 


25,744 
5,201 
2,981 
9,238 


25,462 
5,190 
3,132 

8,825 


405 
395 

85 


1 
1 


4 

_3 


585 
300 
100 
346 


585 
300 
100 
346 



2 


4,033 5 


249 6 


4 


12 


- 


57 


1,935 


_3 


- 


22 


22 


10 


92 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


: 


1 


108< 


• 8 


2 


5 


- 



32 



91 



150 



50 



6 Visits. 



6 Report for 9 months. 



Report for 7 months. 



100 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



N UIK AND ADDHESS 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Concord — Con. 

1 Emerson Hospital In Concord (35 beds) .... 

i Nt-\\ England Deaconess Association (Home for Aged 

Methodist Women) 

3 Women's Parish Association . 

Dalton 

4 Berkshire Animal Rescue League ..... 
B \\ . Murray crane Community House, Trustees of The 

6 Youni; Mens christian Association of Dalton . 

7 Zeuas Crane Fund for Student Aid Inc 

Danvers 

8 Danvers Home for the Aged 

9 Danvers Visiting Nurse Association .... 

10 New England Home for Deaf Mutes (Aged Blind or Infirm), 

The 

11 Putnam Home, Inc 

12 Robert A. Mac Fadden Educational Fund Inc. 

Dedham 

13 Andrew H. Hodgdon Memorial Fund, Inc. 

14 Dedham Community Association, Inc. .... 

15 Dedham Emergency Nursing Association, The 

16 Dedham Temporary Home for Women and Children 

17 Social Service Board of Dedham, Inc., The 

Dennis 

18 Ladies' Aid Society of Dennis, Inc. .... 



Dtjxbury 
Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The 
National Sailors Home . 



Easthampton 
Easthampton Home for Aged Women 
Ella Clark Home for Aged People l 
Helping Hand Society . 



$178,815 


$8,711 


$37,870 


$3,036 


42,928 
8,733 


5,794 
146 


2,624 
922 


4,078 
268 


5,265 

235,953 

98,542 

127,691 


137 
2,265 


374 

528 
200 


68 
5,782 
3,262 
5,145 


110,786 
20,151 


267 
1,021 


518 
1,238 


3,831 
703 


260,365 

52,195 

267 


9,834 
50 


1,750 

1,005 

576 


8,062 

1,289 

6 


15,124 
40,749 


4,294 


32,953 


383 


39,126 
76,536 
14,655 


9,373 
6,059 
3,837 


2,598 

9,129 

368 


643 

2,972 

325 


2,005 


70 


421 


24 


943 
347,295 


1,050 
299 


392 
2,524 


30 
8,095 


3,862 


6 


- 


23 


12,198 


2,217 


1,568 


89 



Easton 
24 Eastondale Community Club 1 



Edgartown 
25 Martha's Vineyard Animal Rescue League, Incorporated . 



26 Camp Chebacco, Inc 

Everett 

27 Albert N. Parlin House, Inc., Webster and Church Sts. . 

28 Everett Cottage Hospital, 103 Garland St. (94 beds) 

29 Everett Home for Aged Persons, 14 Hosmer St. 

30 Everett Young Men's Christian Association . 

31 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett 1 . 

Fairhaven 

32 Community Nurse Association of Fairhaven . 

33 Fairhaven Benevolent Association . 

34 Fairhaven King's Daughters Home for the Aged, Inc. 

35 Ladies Benevolent Society, The 

Fall River 

36 Animal Rescue League of Fall River, 452 Durfee St. 

37 Assoclacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo da Santissima 

Trlndade, 207 Rhode Island Ave 

38 Association for Community Welfare in Fall River, The 7 . 

39 Bishop Stang Day Nursery, The, 217 Third St. 

40 Boys Club of Fall River, 375 Anawan St. 

41 Children's Home of Fall River, 427 Robeson St. 

42 District Nursing Association of Fall River, Incorporated, 

14 Bank St 

43 Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society, The, 14 Bank St. l 

44 Fall River Branch of the American Association of University 

Women, The (excluding Ninth Street Day Nursery), 37 
Ninth St. 

45 Fall River Branch of the American Association of University 

Women, The (Ninth Street Day Nursery) , 37 Ninth St. . 



1,585 


1,542 


100 


- 


1 


3,060 


55 


- 


100,000 

55,388 

42,472 

2,727 


37 
323 


141,721 


1,456 

1,940 

239 


1,606 
52,975 
80,300 

1,298 


1,317 

17 

383 

13 


2,373 

34 

190 

288 


2,938 
2,382 

1 


79,977 


39 


1,048 


5,804 


1,660 


77 


21 


- 


47,016 
547,813 
462,894 


25 

9,721 

35 


1,056 
2,699 
4,095 


253 

12,176 
17,312 



293,473 



99 
37,931 



4,641 



208 
862 



31,349 



1,304 



10,682 



1,318 



- None. 



No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



3 Animals 



* Membership. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



101 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 







Families 




Total 


Indi- 


Exclu- 


Organi- 


Indi- 


viduals 


sive of 


zations 


viduals 


Free 


Indi- 
viduals 





$2,798 



4,750 2 



1.670 2 
1,397 



14,616 2 



200 



1,000 : 
641 
250 



11,242 2 



1,000 



$52,416 



12,591 
1,361 



588 
5,782 
6,056 
5,345 



4,667 
4,362 

19,099 
2,344 

782 



383 
37,248 

13,257 
18,419 
3,531 



46,672 



212 

4,485 



$43,239 



10,361 
926 



367 
5,941 
5,764 
5,640 



4,358 
3,183 

17,851 
3,818 
1,165 



128 
38,620 

13,752 

20,224 

4,470 



368 



46,270 



294 
3,711 



$19,621 
2,808 



2,738 
20 



1,880 
2,078 



6,380 

1,332 

25 



2,781 

7,754 
8.995 
1,300 



10 



1,473 
1,348 


1,656 
13,748 


1,244 
2,700 


29 


15 


- 


3,875 


4,285 


2,006 



- 


1,642 


1,625 


725 


- 


3,115 


3,158 


1,044 


- 


143,214 

2,263 

239 


160,134 

3,074 

12 


61,100 
858 


- 


3,691 

2,989 

3,013 

303 


3,821 

2,919 

9,953 

270 


2,909 
480 
923 


1,235 


8,127 


6,202 


4,030 


- 


99 


136 


22 


7,288 2 


1,334 
24,597 
21,443 


1,183 
25,081 
19,933 


14,807 
8,763 



1,801 



1,272 
20 



188 
17 



1,153 3 789 3 



3 


160 4 


_5 


1 


18 


15 


5 


10 




1 


2,553 « 


842 « 


7 


32 


3 


3 


37 


2 


— 


7 


7 


1 


_5 


_5 


7 


8,909 


5,568 


10 


483 


— 


1 


2,820 


2,820 


1 


- 


- 


1 


420 


380 


6 


21 


15 



150 150 



109 2,989 26 

17- 
- 9 - 



3,300 s 



4,955 3 4,784 3 



9 
14 


95 

2,830* 

60 


12 
13 


26 


7,310 


4,490 


- 


2 


2 


4 


89 


2 



520 



1,416 



23 



5 Not stated. 



7 Name changed to Family Welfare Association of Fall River. 



L02 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Addhess 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



! "vi i. Kl\ BR — Cfm. 
Kail River Council of Olrl Scouts, Inc., 14 Bank St. 
Kail River Deaconess Home, The, 825 Second St. 
Full River Hebrew Women's Charitable Institution 1 
Kail River lliu'li School Alumni Scholarships, Trustees of 
Kail River Jewish Community Center Building, Inc., 456 

South Main St. • 

l all River Jewish Home for the Aged, Inc., 46 Forest St. 

Kail Rivet Women's Union, 101 Rock St. 

Karnily Welfare Association of Fall River. 14 Bank St. 

Ftandsoan Missionaries of Mary, 621 Second St. 

Hebrew Free School Society x .... 

Home for Aged People in Fall River, 1168 Highland Ave 

Junior League of Fall River Inc., 187 Rock St. 

Mt. Lebanon Society, 341 Quequechan St. x 

St. Anne's Hospital Corporation, 795 Middle St. (100 beds) 

Saint Joseph's Orphanage, 56 St. Joseph St. 

Saint Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall River, The, 2860 

North Main St. 

Servants of Relief for Incurable Cancer, The, Woodman and 

Hay sts. (88 beds) 

Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The, 1820 Highland Ave. (112 

beds) 



19 Union Hospital in Fall River, 538 Prospect St. (171 beds) 

20 Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Fall River 

21 Young Men's Christian Association of Fall River, 199 North 

Main St 

Falmouth 

22 Falmouth Institute J 

23 Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated . 

24 Lawrence High School Scholarship Association, Inc., of 

Falmouth, Mass., The 

Fitchburg 

25 Burbank Hospital, Nichols St. (192 beds) 5 . 

26 Emergency Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Inc. 

27 Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg, The, 9 Pricl 

St 

28 Fitchburg Community Chest, Inc., 560 Main St. 

29 Fitchburg Council of Girl Scouts, Inc. . 

30 Fitchburg Helping Hand Association, 35 Holt St. 

31 Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies, 30 Cedar St. . 

32 New England French American Home, 163 South St. 

33 Northern Worcester County Public Health Association 

Inc., 12 Grove St 

34 Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The, 16 Hart- 

35 Wachusett Children's Aid Society, 47 Holt St. 

36 Young Mens Christian Association of Fitchburg, 525 Main 

St 

FOXBOROUGH 

37 Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, Inc. . 

Framingham 

38 Bethel Home for the Aged 

39 Christian Workers' Union 

Framingham Civic League, Inc. ..... 

Framingham Community Chest, Inc. .... 

Framingham Community Health Association, Incorporated 
Framingham Hospital ....... 

Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., The (130 beds) . 
Home for Aged Men and Women in Framingham 
Southwestern Middlesex Public Health Association, Inc. . 
Union Avenue Hospital Inc. ...... 



$6,619 


$1,116 


$2,099 


$239 


96,033 


4,580 


1,768 


2,422 



77,168 



200,148 



1,443 



011,541 


4 


222,091 


19,399 

35,777 

2,006 

68,801 


16,597 

74,662 

1,017 

142 


835 
11,351 


239,562 
13,406 


1,224 


344 
353 


9,738 


10,260 


- 


24,433 
39,549 


6,875 
6,050 


9,656 
11,360 



17,771 



12,975 



137,590 


5,719 


665 


67 


706 


1,173 


37,017 


996 


1,204 


130,528 


4,583 


5,316 


6,745 


27,393 


— 


291 


3,714 


1,622 


187,222 


500 


— 


530,942 


22,688 


116,880 


117,743 


250 


2,846 


9,294 


3,083 


2,245 



3,463 



20,612 

178,044 

80,687 

17,565 


1,874 
1,262 
3,959 
2,440 


2,973 

2,200 

83 

2,110 


5,129 
3.441 


787,089 
1,698 


1,054 


1,657 
508 


29,040 
27 


153,759 
501,309 


6,463 


62,119 
28,793 


1,785 


204,248 


18,163 


5,132 


2,136 


219,525 


15,450 


- 


- 


1,054,104 


50 


173,081 


3,039 


1,960,275 
7,226 


12,949 
197 


139,910 
27 


73,164 
272 


397,699 


• 4,355 


15,509 


6,785 


11,420 


506 


7,767 


180 


2,179 


259 


_ 


35 



8,946 



535 

687 



8,869 
157 



52 



592 
2,112 



1,067 
3,807 



30 



95 

4,458 



Franklin 
Fletcher Hospital, The Trustees of The l 
Frances Eddy King Student Fund, Inc., The . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Franklin, The 



1,411 
32,710 



2,202 



Gardner 

51 Gardner Home for Elderly People, The, 162 Pearl St. l 

52 Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital, The, 242 Green St. 

(81 beds) 



92,214 12,337 



None. 



No report. 



2 Not stated. 



3 Restricted to capital. 



* Membership. 



Pt. II. 


















1 


03 


Charitable Corporations — Continued. 














Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 
and 

Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 




$3,200 3 


$3,456 
8,771 


$3,586 
10,376 


$1,808 
3,809 


- 


2 

8 


_2 

648 


_2 

618 


48 4 


i 

2 


- 


4,906 


5,114 


- 


- 


- 


19 


19 


- 


4 


50 
12,514 
3,500 3 


4,902 

21,108 

7,483 

4,550 


5,477 
14,422 
8,630 
4,775 


1,226 
5,318 
3,882 


- 


4 
18 
3 


17 
912 


912 


I I I I 

00 CD 


5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


56,311 s 


30,697 
1,590 


21,359 
1,387 


11,002 


1 


12 


27 
111* 


- 


~ 


11 

12 


- 


62,119 
39,201 


62,487 
39,233 


23,922 
11,638 


- 


2 82 
49 


2,338 
627 


992 
100 


- 


14 
15 


990 


27,090 


22,557 


4,399 


- 


16 


210 


168 


" 


16 


- 


15,450 


12,878 


2,607 


- 


12 


228 


228 


" 


17 


22,806 
/ 22,472 31 
\ 8,000 J 


199,669 

230,931 
498 


192,172 

227,173 
588 


85,544 

93,517 
268 


1 


133 

176 

1 


2,437 
11,953 


338 
367 


" 


- 


18 

19 
20 



10,006 3 



500 



26,649 

8,454 
294 

231,217 



7,335 
284 

231,217 



18,300 



5,761 



L19.599 



11 



691 * 



383 



160 



4,473 



- 


17,468 


17,205 


4,987 


- 


75,350 


71,104 


1,759 


— 


1,017 


1,068 


168 


- 


11,493 


12,217 


3,896 


1,000 31 
3,743 / 








12,956 


10,597 


4,002 


200 


1,934 


1,936 


360 


- 


11,812 


11,612 


3,996 


- 


17,123 


16,707 


13,882 


- 


19,525 


19,525 


4,498 



31,814 



9,992 



31,965 



,103 



1,880 


2,007 


325 


2,231 


2,358 


350 


9,900 


10,378 


3,954 


27,393 


27,917 


896 


5,336 


5,074 


4,120 


9,766 


9,766 


— 


139,564 


140,604 


52,432 


8,055 


8,739 


3,189 


5,328 


4,810 


1,100 



4 
1 
3 
8 


4514 
216 


_2 


4 
2 


27 
62 


60 


16 


60 


- 


10 
6 


3,545 
204 


1,848 
101 


10 


712 4 


_2 


4 


21 


" 


- 


16 


1 


4 
1 
2 


577 


_ 2 

274 


66 
6 

8 


3,210 
13 

58 


48 



512 



287 



41 
2,963 3,221 



104,551 99,062 



1,621 



41,952 



90 



2.491 



30 



11 



6 Report for 13 months. 



104 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



(Jahdner — Con. 
1 Monadnock Council inc.. Boy Scouts of America, 290 
Central St. . 

Georgetown 
■2 ( arleton Home, Trustees of the ..... 

Gloucester 

3 Addison Gilbert Hospital, The, 298 Washington St. (75 

beds) . . . . . . . . . 

4 Annisquam Association. Inc. ..... 

5 Associated Charities of Gloucester, The, Dale Ave. . 

fi Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons, The, 1 Western 
\\t\ ......... 

7 Gloucester District Nursing Association, 148 Main St. 

B ( Houcester Female Charitable Association, 88 Middle St. . 

9 Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows and Orphans 
Aid Society 

10 Gloucester Fishermen's Institute, 8 Duncan St. 

1 1 Gloucester Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, Inc., 14 Prospect 

st 

12 Huntress Home, 110 Prospect St. 6 .... 

13 Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia . 

14 Young Men's Christian Association of Gloucester, Mass., 

71 Middle St 

Goshen 

15 International Medical Missionary Society, The 

Great Barrington 

16 Fairview Hospital (49 beds) 

17 Visiting Nurse Association of Great Barrington, Mass., The 



Greenfield 

18 Franklin County Public Health Association 

19 Franklin County Public Hospital, The (97 beds) 

20 Girls' Club of Greenfield, Massachusetts, The 

21 Greenfield Health Camp, Inc. 

22 Greenfield Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The 

23 Home for the Aged People of Franklin County 



Hamilton 

24 Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, Incorporated 

25 Visiting Nurse Association of Hamilton and Wenham, Inc. 

Hanover 

26 Hanover Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 

Harwich 

27 Harwich Visiting Nurse Association Incorporated . 



$127 $3,407 $1,109 

48,227 11 1,243 $1,429 



Haverhill 
Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, Inc., 22 Essex 

St 

Esodia Theotokou Scalohoriton Lesvou, Inc. 1 

Family Welfare Society of Haverhill 

General Gale Hospital Aid Association . 

Haverhill Boys Club Association, 55 Emerson St. 

Haverhill Children's Aid Society, 191 Merrimack St 

Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) . 

Haverhill Day Nursery Association, 64 Pecker St. 

Haverhill Female Benevolent Society 

Haverhill Hebrew Sheltering Home, Inc., 23 Gilbert 

Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated 

Haverhill Union Mission, Inc., 100 Winter St. 

Haverhill Young Men's Christian Association, 175 Main St. 

Haverhill Young Women's Christian Association, 107 

Winter St 

Italian Welfare Society, 45 Columbia Park 

Linwood O. Towne Scholarship Association, The, Haverhill 

Hisrh School 

Mary F. Ames Convalescents' Home, Inc., The, 26 Summer 

St 

Massachusetts Pythian Sisters' Home Association! The 

187 Mill St 



Ave. 



899,883 
11,336 
5,399 


1,689 

135 

1,198 


63,745 

1,189 

22 


18,446 

75 

108 


114,170 

8,969 

67,421 


2,043 
24 


350 
1.310 


4,241 

429 

1,423 


75,553 
124,731 


1,655 


5,313 


3,343 
3,472 


102 

86,510 

8,193 


125 

3,300 

683 


HI 


1,887 


201,191 


7,991 


9,998 


2,783 


26,643 


2,829 


3,118 


424 


441,287 
33,291 


2,218 
2,638 


35,418 
3,482 


6,295 
807 


4)249 
463,308 
8,461 
7,448 
7,302 
111 


4,333 
26,511 

2,148 
2,832 
2,758 


755 

80,171 

324 

5,120 


43 
7,305 

34 

181 


705 
1,000 


852 
2,407 


3,176 
357 


- 


713 


739 


742 


16 


745 


2,127 


345 


5 



46 Old Ladies Home Association, 337 Main St. 



8,172 

2,594 

1,268 

150,557 

164,704 

921 

50,453 

122,841 

3,002 

2,574 

13,197 

40,276 

35,038 
975 

2,968 

113,712 

21,232 

297.193 



3 

1,426 

316 

232 

542 

13 

359 

504 

547 

3,709 

1,125 
43 



745 

784 



1 

873 

1,119 

455 

751 

1 

234 

2,652 
8,282 

2,581 
73 



1,034 
8,654 



216 

38 
30 
4,252 
7,048 
11 
1,297 
1,773 



323 
5 

209 

249 

295 

11,062 



None. 



No report. 



Membership. 



3 Not stated. 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



105 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



- 


$4,517 


$4,602 


$2,160 


- 


2,707 


3,420 


795 


- 


83,881 
1,399 
1,328 


98,958 
1,662 
1,274 


42,600 
360 
583 


$3,116 
500< 


7,708 
2,783 
1,447 


5,014 
3,166 
1,880 


2,201 

2,431 

325 


- 


3,343 
10,444 


4,694 
11,768 


297 
8,001 


: 


238 

5,187 

683 


235 

5,066 

823 


2,522 
370 



1 1,104 2 

2 6 



73 3,382 

3 190 

_ _3 



409 
62 



_3 



20,774 



26,074 



13,885 



5 100,000 5 - i 

_ _3 _: 

4 7- 

2 -3 -l 

12 10,503 7,633 



228 



1,365 



121 



5,500* 
1,000 


43,931 

7.928 


45,442 
9,339 


22,714 
5,482 


_ 


5,132 
115,970 
2,472 
2,866 
8,060 


4,786 
113,547 
2,476 
2,646 
8,215 


2,300 
42,245 
1,610 
1,118 
6,680 


1,000 


4,029 
3,765 


4,003 
2,239 


1,770 
1,736 


- 


1,498 


1,586 


340 


_ 


2,478 


2,683 


1,771 



28 

7 


608 
2,081 


46 
54 


" 


2 
68 

2 
12 

4 


658^ 

1,554 

300 2 

144 

4,2517 


_3 

_3 

144 
2,332 7 


495 


2 

1 


3,080 
1,284 


_3 

1,028 


97 


3 


168 


68 


88 


1 


196 


86 


168 



10 



_ 


35 


77 


500 « 


6,552 


6,168 


- 


8,483 


8,801 


— 


699 


970 


- 


2,590 


2,688 


,271 


4,060 


1,945 


— 


359 


357 


- 


835 


1,175 


— 


3,200 


3,332 


500* 


12,403 


12,028 


_ 


4,030 


4,523 


18 


141 


197 


- 


370 


314 


- 


249 


5 


_ 


2,331 


3,691 


>,000 4 \ 
650 / 






21.151 


14,670 


6 Attendance. 


8 Report 



4,463 

1,588 



1,069 
780 



1,332 
4,723 



1,254 
6,278 



- 


- 


- 


3 
2 

145 

1 
177 


3 
2 

2 
3 


1,000 2 

63 

5 

95 

109 

_3 


59 

11 
109 

_3 


3 
5 


796 

487 2 


770 

_3 


118 



7 Visits. 



106 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



N'AiiK AM) ADDRESS 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Haykkhill — Con. 

1 Sarah A. White Home for Aged Men, The, 170 Main St. . 

2 Social Circle of the Portland Street Church, The 

HlNGHAM 

3 Hlmiham Girl Scout Council, Inc. 2 .... 
I mn ghain Memorial Hospital, Inc., The (Not In operation) . 
B 1 1 tn^ham Troop One Committee, Incorporated 

6 Hlngham Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

7 Wilder Charitable & Educational Fund, Inc. . ... 

HOLDEN 

8 Holden District Hospital Inc. (30 beds) .... 

HOLYOKE 

9 Community Welfare League of Holyoke, Massachusetts, 

Incorporated, 328 Maple St. x 

10 Holyoke Boys' Club Association, The, 346 Race St. 

1 l Holyoke Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 362 Dwight 

St 

12 Holyoke Day Nursery, Incorporated, 159 Chestnut St. 

13 Holyoke Family Welfare Society, Inc., 328 Maple St. 

14 Holyoke Hebrew Free Loan Society, 300 Park St. . 

15 Holyoke Home for Aged People, 1 Loomis Ave. 

16 Holyoke Home Information Center, Inc., 330 Maple St. . 

17 Holyoke Hospital, 509 Beech St. (126 beds) . 

18 Holyoke Junior Achievement Foundation, Inc., 70 Essex St. 

19 Holyoke Society for the Care of Crippled Children, Inc. . 

20 Holyoke Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 328 Maple St. . 

2 1 Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association, The, 367 High 

St. . 

22 Ladies Hebrew Free Loan Society, 300 Park St. 

23 Sisters of Providence (See below and also Adams) 

24 Sisters of Providence (Beaven-Kelly Home) Springfield 

Rd 

25 Sisters of Providence (Brightside Orphans' and Bethle- 

hem Homes), Springfield Rd. ..... 

26 Sisters of Providence (House of Providence Hospital and 

Fathers Harkins' Home for Aged Women), 679 Dwight 
St. (120 beds) 

27 Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home for Girls), 

Springfield Rd 

28 Skinner Coffee House, Incorporated, 60 Hamilton St. 

29 United Hebrew Charities of Holyoke, Inc. 

30 White Cross Association for Graduate Nurses of Holyoke, 

Mass. . . . . . 

31 Young Women's Christian Association of Holyoke, The, 

315 Maple St 

HOPEDALE 

32 Hopedale Community House, Inc. .... 

Hudson 

33 Hudson Community Health Association, Incorporated 

34 Hudson Scout Association, Inc., The .... 



35 



HULL 

Father Andrew O'Brien Memorial Association, Inc., of Hull *■ 



Ipswich 

36 Coburn Charitable Society 

37 Ipswich Hospital (operating Benjamin Stickney Cable 

Memorial Hospital) (25 beds) . .' . 

Lancaster 

38 Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, Trustees of the . 

39 Lancaster Social Service Association .... 



Lawrence 

Cardinal Gibbons Club * 

German Old Folks' Home of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 

374 Howard St. . 

Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence . . . 

Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate, The, 189 

Maple St. 

International Association of Y's Men's Clubs, The . 
International Institute of Greater Lawrence, The. 125 

Haverhill St 



$146,416 
529 


$25 


$1,435 
284 


$5,580 


15,450 
1,704 
3,846 

15,024 
157,612 


50 

473 

2,042 


770 

1,858 
163 


49 
4,422 


65,580 


3,825 


37,951 


921 



128,146 



182,382 
412,022 



12,032 
30,436 



6,183 



1,935 



411 



5,122 

75,000 

2,120 

143 

210,635 

5,049 

722,197 

53 

175 

2,001 


3,430 
9,393 
8,701 
1,021 
163 
8,987 
40,993 
3,331 
3,100 
5,350 


1,842 

800 

466 

27,353 

5,741 

101,665 

172 
5,865 


8,644 

95 

13,415 

45 


202,999 
4,137 


16,076 
249 


9,751 
9,621 


15,476 


51,553 


2,115 


15,635 


- 


169,104 


7,868 


27,050 


- 


178,394 


3,088 


122,831 


- 


51,668 

160,707 

732 


1,525 

10,000 

345 


17,201 
989 
955 


2,090 


3,329 


- 


- 


100 


88,041 


5,655 


5,440 


1,005 


624,396 


515 


2,313 


18,808 


1,155 
18,323 


1,047 


1,243 
376 


25 



351 


7,185 


22,565 


22,541 


698 


357 

878 



41,617 
1,109 


1,430 
582 


2,973 
627 


1,068 
24 


131,973 
1,138 


16,033 
7,762 


22,752 
1,986 


34 
16 


65 


4,524 


775 


- 


3 


Membership. 


4 Not stated 





- None. 



1 No report. 



: Report for 9 months. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



107 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 
and 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



100 



3,050 



57,047 


$2,893 


309 


223 


821 


587 


49 


- 


473 


276 


3,901 


3,910 


4,585 


4,598 



42,697 



5,572 
1,233 



41,869 
9,765 



43,110 



6,916 



$1,157 



2,152 
1,014 



12,822 



144 3 
422 



11 1,043 



102 



104 



110 3 



$3,000 5 


5,272 


5,371 


3,217 


1 


1 


881 3 


_4 


- 


100 


10,293 


11,116 


4,053 


- 


14 


223 


159 


240 


- 


9,167 


9,322 


5,775 


- 


5 


- 


- 


709 


- 


28,375 


28,798 


125 


1 


- 


189 


189 


- 


16,490 


31,039 


13,591 


4,916 


- 


7 


25 


- 


- 


- 


9,086 


9,179 


7,021 


- 


10 


712 


712 


- 


- 


156,073 


151,453 


56,972 


- 


130 


4,049 


240 


- 


- 


3,331 


3,289 


2,686 


- 


5 


1,070 


1,070 


- 


— 


3,272 


3,330 


1,309 


- 


1 


222 


175 


— 


1,279 5 


11,260 


11,553 


10,142 


- 


7 


15,009 G 


7,638 6 


1,709 


- 


38,304 


37,841 


18,914 


1 


11 


1,061 3 


_4 


- 


~ 


9,870 


9,397 


_ 


- 


~ 


_ 


~ 


100 


- 


17,751 


17,495 


4,513 


- 


10 


79 


2 


- 


5,459 


40,378 


40,285 


7,052 


- 


17 


238 


13 


- 


- 


125,919 


136,434 


38,214 


- 


84 


4,504 


445 


- 


1,088 


19,815 


19,851 


3,008 


_ 


10 


124 


9 


_ 


— 


13,079 


12,964 


6,562 


— 


15 


4,514 


2,294 


7 


- 


1,301 


1,314 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


- 


100 


125 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


- 


- 


12,100 


12,155 


7,128 


- 


6 


2,130 


7 


- 


- 


21,637 


14,551 


6,135 


- 


6 


_4 


_4 


- 


_ 


2,316 


2,066 


1,640 


_ 


1 


1,612 


449 




- 


376 


216 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



454 


7,991 


8,596 


3,259 


120,818 6 


47,041 


40,639 


14,395 


5,000 


357 
7,183 


361 
2,654 


1,554 



5 


126 


39 


16 


528 


6 


1 


14 
236 


14 
183 



6,400 
1,262 



37,332 
9,967 



6,518 



10,857 
2,408 



4,902 



2 


19 
101 


101 


55 
5 


260 


109 


7 


1,553 


1,553 



125 



- 43 

1 44 



5 Restricted to capital. 



IDs 



P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Naiie and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends. 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Lawrence Con. 

1 Lawronoe Boys' Club, 155 Haverhill St. . 

2 Lawrence City Mission, 31 Jackson St. . 

:? Lawrence Community chest, inc., 155 Haverhill St. 



Lawrence General Hospital, 63 Garden St. (130 beds) 
Lawrence Home for Aged People, The, 150 Berkeley St 
Lawrence Tuberculosis League, Inc., 31 Jackson St. 
Lawrence Young Men's Christian Association, 40 Lawrence 

St. 

Lawrence Young Women's Christian Association, 

Lawrence St. . 
Lithuanian National Catholic Vytautas Old Folks' Home 

Inc. ........ 

Maronite Ladies Aid Society of Lawrence, 10 Lowell St. 
North Essex Council, Inc., Boy Scouts ol America, 31 

Jackson St. ...... . 

Patriotic Society of Habossi, Incorporated 

H us-el l-Hood Trust, Incorporated ! 

United Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Association, 85 Concord 

st. ' 

I'nited Syrian Society of Lawrence, Mass., 381 Chestnut St 

Lee 
Ascension Farm School, The Corporation of the 

Leicester 
Leicester Samaritan Association .... 

Lenox 
Berkshire County Home for Aged Women (Meadow Place 

Branch) (See also Pittsfleld) 

Lenox Visiting Nurse Association ..... 

Leominster 
Leominster Community Chest, Inc., 19 Main St. 
Leominster Home for Old Ladies, The, 16 Pearl St. . 
Leominster Hospital Association, Hospital Rd. (63 beds) . 
Wachusett Council, Inc.. Boy Scouts of America, 11 Park 
St 

Lexington 
Amanda Caroline Payson Education Fund for Girls, Inc. . 
Isaac Harris Cary Educational Fund 



26 Lexington Home for Aged People 

27 Lexington Public Health Association Inc. 

Lincoln 

28 Farrington Memorial, Incorporated .... 

Lowell 

29 Ahepa Charitable Bureau, Inc. * 

30 L* Association Educatrice Franco-Americaine Inc., 121 

School St 

31 Ayer Home, Trustees of the, 159 Pawtucket St. 

32 Battles Home, The, 93 Rolfe St 

33 Channing Fraternity 

34 Children's Home, 648 Central St. 1 

35 Faith Home, 249 Westford St 

36 Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowell, 36 John St. 

37 Greater Lowell Council of the Boy Scouts of America, The, 

36 John St 

38 Horn Home for Aged Couples, The, 98 Smith St. 

39 Humphrey O'Sullivan Fund, Inc 

40 International Institute of Lowell, Inc., 25 Palmer St. 

41 Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, The, 63 Howard 

St. i 

42 Ladies Helping Hand Society, The, 63 Howard St. . 

43 Lowell Association for the Blind, Inc., 36 John St. . 

44 Lowell Boys Club Association, 227 Dutton St. 

45 Lowell Community Chest Association, Inc., 34 John St. . 

46 Lowell Day Nursery Association, 119 Hall St. 

47 Lowell Dispensary ....... 

48 Lowell General Hospital, The, Varnum Ave. (150 beds) . 

49 Lowell Goodwill Industries, Inc., The, 85 French St. 

50 Lowell Hebrew Community Center, Inc., 105 Princeton 

Boulevard .... 



$72,697 
16,398 

9,878 


$8,196 

13,153 

104,107 


$322 
1,998 


$1,388 
232 
155 


842,546 


42,571 


123,865 


33,917 


18,199 


5,730 


337 


3 


245,017 


12,198 


45,214 


1,093 


162,344 


9,820 


9,626 


383 


23,131 
4,658 


324 

327 


14,595 
170 


- 


6,831 
5,734 


7,345 
242 


3,189 


331 


10,061 


754 


1,694 


912 


90,117 


5,741 


3,192 


273 


5,449 


347 


704 


145 


381,702 
6,855 


12,000 
1,053 


7,873 
294 


14,075 


173 

151,977 
362,728 


9,333 
3,025 


300 
51,644 


7,816 
2,203 


8,655 


4,964 


2,693 


- 


33,323 
228,719 


- 


17 


1,175 
10,100 


82,451 
5,791 


1,916 
2,861 


70 

477 


2,698 
121 



297,674 



100 



9,709 



8,559 

362,947 

132,015 

10,237 


75 
105 


832 
700 
119 


14,406 

3,844 

363 


43,424 
13,649 


3,273 
2,146 


601 
249 


704 
342 


10,350 
38,359 


7,042 
2,131 


5,243 
9 


10 
441 


3 


6,457 


449 


- 


2,389 

1,618 

93,881 

80,469 


358 

833 

6,905 

133,116 


1,354 
212 


675 


120,188 

7,005 

2,644,250 

136 


2,125 
1,597 


1,937 

118,207 
18,381 


5,537 

172 

71,946 


87,981 


8,069 


89 


4 



1 No report. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



109 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$4,079 *\ 
11,178 / 


$9,908 

15,383 

104,262 

183,932 


$10,272 

14,148 

109,711 

168,987 


$6,119 
6,747 
4,506 

78,302 


- 


6,070 


5,982 


2,738 


- 


58,507 


58,473 


24,507 


- 


19,830 


19,518 


10,789 


- 


14,919 
497 


12,735 
465 


2,138 


- 


10,534 
573 


9,854 
307 


3,586 



3,360 1,546 389 

200* 9,207 10,893 3,461 

1,195 1,300 458 



33,949 
1,347 



9,334 

8,132 

56,873 

7.657 



6,808 
50.183 



7,232 



4,252 
1,521 



545 

3,010 

19,351 

3,395 



5 2,200 2 
5 

2 

134 4,545 1,463 

20 72 33 

18 2,838 2 

7 17,539 15,595 

6 21 15 



1 


_3 


_3 




20 


20 


21 


- 


- 


5 


24 


14 


1 


245 


93 


7 


18 




1 


318 


200 


1 






3 


11 


- 


42 


3,332 


688 



12 



20 



12 



186 



820 2 



- 


1,192 


1,344 


- 


— 


10,100 


9,553 


300 


1.400 4 \ 
1,000 / 








5,685 


8,919 


3,679 


- 


3,460 


3,207 


2,266 



4,596 



1 


7 
42 


7 
42 


4 

1 


9 
303 


196 


9 


280 


280 



10,514 4 



907 

15,106 

4,068 

363 


921 

14,672 

3,805 

446 


4,251 
1,710 


- 


11 
3 


1 
66 
12 


1 
66 


4,578 
2,874 


4,182 
2,957 


1,300 
1,395 


1 


1 

2 


12 
62 


5 
62 


12,174 

2,582 


12,384 
3,828 


4,023 
957 


1 


1 
1 


1.513 2 
12 





6,907 



6,904 



U64 



?,730 



5,431 





- 


1,713 


1,713 


- 




35 


1,081 


1,074 


233 




1,000* 


6,905 


6,903 


4,852 




- 


133,792 


125,613 


4,782 


I 


1,000 4 \ 
1,000 / 








10,603 


6,273 


2,939 




- 


172 


42 


— 




7.208* 


190,465 


142,594 


54,418 




- 


19,979 


19,902 


15,780 



1,593 



1,439 



1 


1 


_3 


_3 


— 


3 


_3 


_3 


1 


3 


~ 


~ 


_ 


6 


204 


_3 


- 


- 


20 


20 


1 


108 


6,496 


209 


- 


28 


135 


_s 



40 



Membership. 



3 Not stated. 



* Restricted to capital. 



110 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Lowell — Con. 
1 i.owcll Humane Society, The, 97 Central St. . . . $62,619 $259 $724 $5,549 

.\ ell rartlcular Council of the Society of St. Vincent de 

Paul, 8 Merrimack St. .... 

3 Lowell Social Service League, Inc., 36 John St. 

I Lowell Textile Associates, Inc 

.". l Dwell Tuberculosis Association, Inc., 36 John St. . 

6 Lowell VTflltlng Nurse Association, 1 Dutton St. 

7 Lowell Welfare Foundation, The l . , . 
B Lowell Young Men's Christian Association, 272 Merrimack 

st ... 

D Ministry-at-Large in Lowell, 150 Middlesex St. 

10 Old Ladies' Home, 520 Fletcher St. 

11 L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain, 249 Pawtucket St. . 

12 Phileducatlonal Association of Georgltsiotes, "Socrates" l 

13 Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St. Peter's Orphan 

Asylum), 530 Stevens St 

14 Saint John's Hospital, 14 Bartlett St. (148 beds) 

15 St. Joseph's Hospital, Inc., 830 Merrimack St. (105 beds) 

16 Young Women's Christian Association of Lowell, 50 John 

St 170,703 9,674 21,045 3,050 



557 

50 

14,610 

3,711 

10,324 


323 

13,977 

68 

5,289 

13,300 


451 
6,566 

20,099 


518 


385,620 
79,365 


11,040 
176 


27,088 
17 


3,850 
2,604 


385,335 
163,632 


152 
30,780 


4,258 
21,359 


8,909 
621 


104,870 
426,586 
216,303 


1,808 

350 

3,030 


8,487 
123,037 
89.665 


93 

8,658 
1,452 



Ludlow 
Ludlow Hospital Society J ..... 

Lynn 
Aid Society of the Lynn Day Nursery, The, 15 Church St. 
Associated Charities of Lynn, The, 23 Central Ave. 
Associated Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew 

Association of New England District No. 2 Camp, Inc. 7 8 
Boys' Club of Lynn, 25 North Common St. 
Camp Rotary, Inc., of Lynn, Mass. 
Charitable Travelers Sheltering Association, Inc., 53 

Wheeler St. 1 

Columbus Guild of Lynn, 121 North Common St. 
Community Fund Association of Greater Lynn, 90 : 

change St. ..... . 

Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples, 159 Washington St 
Greek Women's Aid Society of Lynn, Mass., 11 Church St 
Harris Goldman Charity Fund, Inc., The, 25 Central Sq. 
Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn, The 
J. Fergus Gifford Shoe and Stocking Fund of the Lynn 

Rotary Club, Inc. x . 
Junior Aid Society, Inc. .... 

Lynn Association for the Blind, Inc. 

Lynn Council, Boy Scouts of America, 31 Exchange St. 

Lynn Gold Star Mothers, Inc. l 

Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Society 

Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Helping-Hand Society, The 

Lynn Home for Aged Men, 34 Forest St. r 

Lynn Home for Aged Women, 37 Breed St. 

Lynn Home for Children, 15 Church St. 

Lynn Home for Young Women, 144 Broad St. 

Lynn Hospital, 212 Boston St. (166 beds) 

Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association, The 

Lynn Tuberculosis League, 136 Broad St. 

Lynn Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 136 Broad St 

Mirabeau Fresh Air Camp, Inc. 

Neighborhood House Association, 53 Neptune St. 

Pullman Mission ...... 

Union Hospital, Linwood Rd. (65 beds) . 
Women's Union for Christian Work incorporated at Lynn 
Young Men's Christian Association of Lynn, 85 Market St 
Young Men's Hebrew Association of Lynn, Mass., 22 City 

Hall Sq 



Malden 
Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation, The, 22 Ferry St. 
Associated Charities of Maiden, The, 15 Ferry St. . 
Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc., The, 80 Mountain 

Ave. 

Harriet E. Sawyer Home for Aged Women, Inc., The, 22 

Parker St. (See also Ayer) ...... 

Maiden Arbeiter Ferein, Inc. ..... 

Maiden Children's Health Camp Association, Inc., 49 

Wicklow St 

Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association, The . 



44,470 
26,756 


6,695 
12,915 


4,312 
1,589 


1,238 
1,961 


15,086 

152,044 

18,030 


170 

11,534 

1,568 


15,030 
1.255 


1,686 
2 


22,775 


664 


3,722 


88 



34,000 

98,765 

704 

25,045 



2,250 
10,131 
21,652 



974 



513,392 

57,038 

118,320 

1,295,301 

1,526 

1,200 
21,319 
17,000 
51,488 

476,812 



34,253 
64,713 



21,872 



39,288 
1,001 



130,875 
824 
140 



8,991 

239 
219 

2.289 

610 

37 

21,198 

300 

2,662 

490 
3,190 

606 
3,209 

20,000 

3,056 



1,000 
342 



1,394 
560 



1,934 
175 



224 



3,322 
9,824 



1,410 
154 



2,833 
4,115 



156,216 



251 

1,193 

50,741 

44,136 

4,838 



2,753 
8,172 



500 



25 
289 



19,498 
3,188 
4,829 

11,713 



600 
544 



879 



2,010 
3.195 



None. 



1 No report. 



Not stated. 



6 Membership. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Ill 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



1.301 6 



$6,533 



$5,331 



33,769 



12,247 
16,480 

15,200 

14,476 

1,570 



33,790 



12,070 
16,533 

11,645 

13,927 

1,658 



$3,730 



- 


323 

14,428 

7,152 

5,289 

33,399 


353 

15,135 

6,517 

5,787 

31,317 


4,230 

_3 

3,045 
25,676 


$9,392 «\ 
6,200 / 


41,978 
2,798 

19,694 
52,761 


42,225 
2,910 

18,893 
24,550 


21,988 

5,876 
6,192 


333 


10,389 

132,379 

97,435 


10,290 

129.706 

95.815 


3,560 
44,848 
31,420 



18,832 



4,855 
4,939 



2,312 
6,773 



1,236 



450 


130,875 

5,673 

370 

500 

1,179 


126,981 

5,899 

330 

558 

1,179 


4,487 
2,446 

361 


- 


4,031 

289 

18,572 


4,367 

329 

17,836 


6,389 


- 


1,650 
373 


1,739 
373 


- 


5,439 

2,000 
626 


30,119 
7,915 

15,774 

188,790 

1,243 

2,662 


17,562 
7,234 

13,661 

199,121 

1,243 

2,947 


4,870 

1,084 

5,342 

93,508 

1.680 


300 


490 

4,342 

2,344 

53,950 


450 

4,106 

2,840 

57,231 


78 

1,661 

280 

20,308 


3,885 • 


64,016 


64,094 


31,675 


- ' 


7,894 


8,315 


3,627 


2,500 


3,010 
6,046 


1,639 
2,972 


2,483 


- 


3,189 


3,871 


1,588 


- 


9,566 
880 


11,024 
639 


3,447 
45 


1,000 


2,934 
13.763 


2,342 
13.340 


875 
141 



3 17.462 2 



2 -3 -3 

22 31,081 4 7.795 4 



15 1.843 » - : 

171 171 



38 312 



12 

_3 



64 



13 99 5 

127 9,961 6,613 

74 9.563 67 

19 4,690 3,107 



25 

14 


529 

2,360 B 

55 


1,430 6 

28 


2 


277 


275 


2 


_ 


_ 



- 


- 


40 


40 


2 


2 


1,350 s 


_3 


_ 


_ 


62 


62 


- 


- 


_3 


_3 


1 


7 


37 


7 


— 


2 


58 


21 


1 


9 


26 


8 


_3 


104 


38,055 


18,107 


— 


- 


50 


_3 




. 1 


.-3 


_3 


_ 


1 


5 


5 


1 


5 


349 


285 


— 


1 


106 


106 


- 


34 


1,056 


65 


- 


30 


3,732 6 


_3 


- 


3 


456 


222 


- 


2 


540 


540 


- 


2 


45 


- 


_ 


5 


25 


_ 


1 


- 


21 


21 


1 


5 


73 


73 


2 


- 


270 


270 



616 



870 



1,723 



56 



40 



21 



10 



• Restricted to capital. 7 Name changed to Bauercrest Y. M. & Y. W H. A. Camp, Inc. 



8 Report for 15 months. 



112 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Naiie and Address 



Total. 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



12 



Malden — Con. 
Maiden Hinh School Scholarship, Inc. .... 
Maiden Home for Aged Persons, The, 578 Main St. 
Maiden Hospital. The, Murray Hill Rd. (190 beds) 
Maiden Hospital Associates, Incorporated 

Maiden Industrial Aid Society, The, 21 Ferry St. 

Maiden Tuberculosis and Health Association, Inc., 15 

Ferry St. 

Maiden Young Men's Christian Association, The, 83 

Pleasant St 

Monday Club of Maiden, The 

Quannapowitt Council, Boy Scouts of America, The, 50 

Pleasant St 

Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden 1 

Young Women's Christian Association of Maiden, 54 

Washington St 

Mansfield 
Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association .... 



Marblehead 

13 Marblehead Female Humane Society ... 

14 Marblehead Visiting Nurse Association ... 

15 Young Men's Christian Association of Marblehead, The x 

Marlborough 

16 Algonquin Council, Boy Scouts of America, Incorporated 

17 Hillside School, Robin Hill Rd 

18 Marlborough Hospital, Union St. (65 beds) 

19 Marlborough Woman's Club .... 

20 Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society ... 



$11,627 

321,922 

898,450 

201 


$627 

3.012 

108 


$6,786 
160,187 


$385 
11,069 
10,710 


185,684 


1,548 


1,227 


4,537 


4,769 


1,218 


- 


- 


261,913 
4,722 


2,906 
191 


25,797 
146 


2,554 
112 


26,158 


6,069 


8,398 


- 


25,403 


856 


1,385 


37 


1.463 


745 


1,936 


18 


103,992 
27,894 


891 
673 


1 
585 


3,792 
1,256 


20,105 

74,339 

146,507 

1,925 

5,470 


5,858 

13,668 

2,660 

1,407 

247 


4,448 

20,536 

49,334 

918 

591 


279 

18 

1,007 

2 

204 



Marshfield 

21 Nathaniel Taylor Fund Inc 

Maynard 

22 Russian Educational Society of Maynard, Inc., The 

Medford 

23 Lawrence Memorial Hospital of Medford, 170 Governors 

Ave. (75 beds) 

24 Medford Council Girl Scouts, Inc., 26 High St. 

25 Medford Home for Aged Men and Women, 203 High St. . 

26 Medford Unemployment and Relief Association, Inc., 60 

Salem St. 

27 Medford Visiting Nurse Association, 107 Salem St. . 

28 Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children, The . 

Melrose 

29 Fitch Home, Inc., The, 75 Lake Ave 

30 Melrose Hospital Association, 585 Lebanon St. 1 

31 Morgan and Dodge Home for Aged Women, The, 265 

Franklin St. 1 



143 



191 



14,056 



593,959 

1,165 

206,603 


300 

224 

1,844 


115,832 

8,346 

895 


15.335 

25 

7,015 


60 

32,909 

187,661 


155 
2,319 
1,173 


6,179 


1 
1,186 
7,731 


410,837 


577 


1.951 


11,038 



32 



Mendon 
Resthaven Association, Inc., The 



237 



37 



Methtjen 

33 Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Temporary Home, 

The . 

34 Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and Incurable 



Middleborotjgh 

Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc 

Middleborough Relief Association Inc 

Montgomery Home for Aged People .... 
St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborough (23 beds) 
Young Men's Christian Association of Middleborough, The 
Y. M. H. A. Camp Avoda Association, Inc. 



Milford 
Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy 

(See also Springfield) 

Home for the Aged at Milford, The .... 

Milford-Hopedale-Mendon Instructive District Nursing 

Association ........ 

Milford Hospital (60 beds) 

Young Men's Christian Association of Milford 



3,194 
356,398 


1,351 
4,964 


2,892 
11,998 


159 

8,348 


4,702 

76 

122,978 

126,340 

50,804 

8,953 


11 

82 
1,377 
1,541 


180 

9 
16,269 
4,893 
10,933 


5,352 

6,126 

1,520 

216 


793 
15,780 


1,986 


110 


5 

462 


33,126 
555,964 


4,030 
5,500 


6,893 
64,474 


16.647 



- None. 



1 No report. 



2 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



113 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 
and 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$11,000 
25,000 

/ 200 2 \ 
1 2,500 / 


$385 

29,483 

197,723 

108 

9,814 


$300 

15,414 

189,254 

16 

7,219 


$7,238 
67,911 

4,196 


- 


1,222 


999 


300 


2,500 
2,500 


33,757 
2,949 


27,163 
329 


14,199 


- 


14,472 


11.676 


2,034 


2,500 


4,779 


2,583 


1,317 


- 


2,701 


2,542 


2,106 


- 


4,684 
2,519 


4,970 
2,549 


1,819 
1.760 


752 
6,937 2 


10,585 

34,974 

53,002 

2,327 

1,043 


10,349 

29,287 

53,580 

2,213 

1,078 


5,492 
10,290 
18,435 

1,040 
68 


- 


475 


595 


- 


- 


457 


479 


120 


- 


131,168 
8,665 
9,755 


123,852 
8,310 
8,356 


53,291 
1,982 
2,935 


- 


157 
9,685 
8,904 


141 
8,670 
8,721 


6,183 
7,400 



7 
)6 


4 

30 

3,426 


4 
43 


7 


249 


206 


- 


15 


15 


L4 


1,426 3 

_4 


30 3 

_4 


2 


1,325 3 


_4 


3 


327 3 


_4 



330 5 



20 



3 


16 


11 


- 


1 


1,460 5 


730 5 


— 


2 


1,722 3 


_„ 


423 


10 


75 


3 


— 


37 


2,263 


205 


— 


1 


1,325 5 


323 5 


— 


3 


8 


8 


7 


_ 


_ 


_ 


52 



9 


2,666 

600 3 


299 

_4 


_ 


4 


14 


- 


- 


_ 


27 


27 


23 


4 


7,074 5 


_4 


- 


4 


26 


19 


23 



29 



9,075 



22.643 



12,608 



284 



22 



26,000 



4,339 
51,312 



4,239 
38,775 



1,674 
15,603 



25 



103 



,000 2 



191 

5,443 
23,772 

7,955 
11,149 



179 

15 

5,356 

24,090 

7,805 

7,761 



2,467 

12,236 

4,232 

2,163 



2 9 
13 529 

3 403 

18 889 



200 2 



2,102 
462 



10,923 
81,622 



2,040 



10,951 
67,308 



9,059 
23,404 



1,962 
2,174 



975 
979 



25 



3 Membership. 



4 Not stated. 



6 Visits. 



11-1 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 





Subscriptions 




Total 


and Gifts 


Earnings 


Property 


Restricted 


and 


Reported 


or not 


Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



MlLLBURY 

Mlllbury Society for District Nursing, The 

Milton 
Cunningham Foundation .... 
Fuller Trust, Inc., The .... 
Milton Hospital and Convalescent Home (27 beds) 
Milton Visiting Nurse and Social Service League 
Swift Charity 



Monson 
Monson Home for Aged People, Inc 

Montague 
Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, Massachu- 
setts, The 3 



Monterey 
William J. Gould Associates, Inc., The . 

Nantucket 
Children's Aid Society of Nantucket 
Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc. 
Nantucket Cottage Hospital (19 beds) . 
Old People's Home Association of Nantucket, The 
Relief Association ..... 

Union Benevolent Society, The 



Natick 
Leonard Morse Hospital (36 beds) 
Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons 
Natick Visiting Nurse Association, The . 
New England Deaconess Association (J. W. Wilbur Health 
Home) ........ 



Needham 
King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc. 
Needham Visiting Nurse Association Inc. 

New Bedford 
Animal Rescue League of New Bedford, 38 Hillman St. 
Association for the Relief of Aged Women 
Cachalot Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 105 William 

St 

College Club of New Bedford, Inc., The 

Hachnosath Orchim Charitable Association, 271 County 

St. i 

Hebrew Free Loan Society of New Bedford, Inc., 57 How- 
land St 

Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society, New Bedford, Mass 
Henryk Dabrowski Society, 146 Ashley Blvd. . . ; 

Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees of the 
James Arnold Fund, Trustees of the 
Ladies City Mission Society in New Bedford, 755 South 

First St 

New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association (Operating 

Sassaquln Sanatorium), 4431 Acushnet Ave. (116 beds) 
New Bedford Children's Aid Society, 60 Eighth St. . 
New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. 
New Bedford Day Nursery, 1060 Cove Rd. 
New Bedford Dorcas Society 

New Bedford Family Welfare Society, 60 Eighth St. * 
New Bedford Girl Scouts Inc., 12 Market St. . 
New Bedford Home for Aged, 396 West Middle St. 
New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association, The, 60 

Eighth St 

New Bedford Men's Mission, Inc., 151 North Second St, 

New Bedford Port Society, 15 Johnny Cake Hill 

New Bedford Port Society, Ladies Branch 

New Bedford Young Men's Christian Association, The 

147 Williams St. 

New Bedford Young Women's Christian Association, 

Spring St. 

North End Guild of New Bedford, Tallman St. 

Portuguese Relief Association, Inc. 

Sacred Heart Home, 359 Summer St. . 

Saint Luke's Hospital of New Bedford, 95 Page St. (378 

beds) 



$712 



283,531 

1,373,462 

224.766 

2,485 

66,984 



137,864 



18,000 



$1,483 



34,500 
2,000 
3,312 

7,883 



419 



4,894 



$1,527 



3,574 

1,359 

26,447 

3,821 



11,822 



5,422 


11 


- 


35,052 


100 


— 


256,325 


16,378 


18,055 


80,329 


459 


632 


45,338 


784 


- 


6,738 


~ 


— 


388,421 


25,434 


42,901 


114,131 


200 


3,417 


4,111 


2,100 


1,767 



1,792 



$37 



66,134 
9,575 



3,187 
4,943 



356 



165 

930 

5,908 

1,606 

1,629 

237 



4,956 

5,439 

52 

34 



1,024 
106 


58 
249 


75 

2,292 


25 


178,278 
626,546 


247 
58 


2,980 
120 


6,013 
30,055 


4,108 
3,578 


6,310 
638 


1,604 


91 


342 

2,850 

11,683 

60,122 

113,954 


956 

1,675 

282 


253 

1,597 

20 


1,202 
2,649 
4,624 


109,648 


4,657 


557 


2,896 


425,151 
275,560 

20,097 
131,239 

22,452 


269 
6,697 

158 
1,158 


87,294 

4,680 

206 

1,173 


8.370 
12,204 

889 
5,026 

764 


4,275 
112,622 


1,956 
10 


3,183 
163 


75 
2,736 


36,086 
. 21,448 
131.076 

74,684 


4,972 

1,866 

91 

21 


11,397 
3,684 

21 


1,969 

4.109 
2,116 


153,791 


9,647 


16,282 


2,059 


442,651 

22,452 

24 

294,510 


13,095 

654 

6 

980 


42,605 

5 

37 

45,432 


2,706 

830 

2 


,585,805 


27,513 


302,468 


82,005 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Visits. 



3 Report not due. 



4 Restricted to capital. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



115 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$3,045 



$3,483 



$1,509 



2,393 2 697 2 



38,074 


38,189 


20,266 


1 


8 


- 


- 


69,494 


29,899 


16,180 


2 


8 


12 


9 


39,928 


41,780 


21,366 


- 


17 


1,152 


80 


11,788 


11,082 


7,538 


- 


7 


8,7312 


3,717 2 


3,187 


3,156 


- 


- 


- 


16 


16 



5,362 



5,406 



1,988 



$133 4 



17,074 



19,899 



1,655 



176 


689 


_ 


1,041 


1,087 


534 


40,404 


36,834 


18,321 


4,353 


3,875 


1,747 


2,413 


3,090 


100 


237 


395 


45 


73,292 


79,816 


40,536 


9,056 


7,299 


2,670 


3,920 


3,084 


2,273 



2 


35 


23 


618 


3 


5 


- 


19 



5,128 



_5 

46 
12 



26 



- 


159 

2,543 


151 
2,902 


2,258 


- 


1 


3 
2,471 


3 

984 


3 

264 


2,000 
25,467 


11,241 
55,701 


18,553 
34,141 


6,502 


- 


6 


6,526 6 
63 


6,106 s 
63 


_ 


- 


6,310 
2,334 


6,071 
2,224 


3,364 


1 


2 


l.lOl 7 
6 


1,101 7 

6 


- 


- 


1,209 
3,272 
1,484 
2,669 
4,624 


1,097 
3,431 
1,116 

2,588 
3,782 


100 


1 


- 


86 

26 
14 


86 

26 
14 


56 


3.000 


11,111 


8,518 


5,908 


- 


5 


2,992 


1,798 


70 


10,000 
5,000 


103,666 

33,582 

1,253 

12,357 

764 


104,232 

25,026 

1,597 

7,349 

743 


_5 

12,678 
4,088 


1 


106 
10 

8 


2,678 
194 

170 
180 


2,469 
128 

10 
180 


105 
65 


3,317 


5,216 
6,226 


5,404 
3,021 


1,604 
654 


- 


2 
3 


-5 

7 


_5 

5 


- 


9,000 
3,000 4 


27,338 
5,550 
4,201 
2,159 


20,590 
4,901 
4,777 
2,628 


17,807 

1,857 

1,650 

150 


: 


13 
4 
2 
1 


3,345 

4,568 

142 

11 


1,176 

3,121 

90 

11 


: 


1,000 


28,988 


29,180 


16,134 


- 


14 


5,893 


4,580 


- 


675 


58,406 

2,166 

45 

47,383 


65,973 

1,539 

43 

29,883 


27,507 
1,083 

5,176 


: 


35 
3 

32 


_6 
-6 

215 


_5 
_5 

34 


- 


- 


411,987 


440,037 


207,256 


1 


318 


13,037 


584 


- 


5 


Not stated. 


6 Animals. 


7 Membership 




8 Report for 17 months. 





116 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



NiiiE and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



New Bedford — Con. 
1 Saint Mary's Home of New Bedford, 593 Kempton St. . $232,688 

3 Inion Tor Good Works, 12 Market St 199,281 

8 Welfare Federation of New Bedford, 60 Eighth St. . . 1,540 
1 Winfred Goff Homoeopathic Hospital, The (not in opera- 
tion) 13,817 

Newburyport 

5 Anna Jaques Hospital, Highland Ave. (51 beds) . . 708,979 

6 Community Welfare Service of Newburyport, Inc., The, 

2 Harris St 4,689 

7 General Charitable Society of Newburyport . . . 63,062 

8 Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newburyport Fire 

Department, The, Central Fire Station . . . 7,567 

9 Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport, The . . 129 

10 Merrimack Humane Society, The 17,514 

11 Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newburyport, The, 2 

Harris St - ; 

12 Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 2 Harris St. . 24,133 

13 Newburyport Bethel Society 3,842 

14 Newburyport Female Charitable Society, The . . 132 

15 Newburyport Homeopathic Hospital, The, 277 High St. 

(25 beds) 67,415 

16 Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Men, 361 High 

St 169,741 

17 Newburyport Society for the relief of Aged Women, 75 

High St 306,074 

18 Newburyport Young Men's Christian Association, 98 State 

St 118,194 

19 Young Women's Christian Association of Newburyport, 13 

Market St 115,832 

New Marlborough 

20 Smith Park Young Men's Christian Association . . 65,000 

Newton 

21 All Newton Music School, Incorporated .... 116 

22 All Souls Lend A Hand Club, Inc. .... 20,554 

23 Baptist Home of Massachusetts, The, 66 Commonwealth 

Ave 1,004,900 

24 Boys Welfare League Inc 1,200 

25 Charles D. Meserve Fund, Inc 7,252 

26 Governor John A. Andrew Home Association, 92 Washing- 

ton Park, Newtonville ...... 9,688 

27 Lamson Home, The 8,494 

28 Lasell Alumnae, Inc. ....... 10,528 

29 Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolu- 

tion, 2349 Washington St., Newton Lower Falls . . 8,662 

30 Mayor's Relief Committee Inc., 93 Union St., Newton 

Centre ......... 439 

31 Mothers' Rest Association of the City of Newton, In- 

corporated, The, 26 Oak Hill St., Newton Centre . 34,514 

32 New England Peabody Home for Crippled Children, The, 

474 Brookline St., Newton Centre .... 1,188,366 

33 Newton Centre Woman's Club, Inc., The, 1280 Centre St., 

Newton Centre 78,391 

34 Newton Circle, Incorporated, The 4 2,275 

35 Newton Community Chest, Incorporated, 93 Union St., 

Newton Centre ....... 121,969 

36 Newton District Nursing Association, 297 Walnut St., 

Newtonville 5,525 

37 Newton Hospital, 2014 Washington St., Newton Lower 

Falls (194 beds) 2,310,930 

38 Newton Hospital Aid Association, The .... 2,788 

39 Newton Local Council, Girl Scouts, Inc., 297 Walnut St. . 33,345 

40 Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc., 12 Austin St., Newtonville. 25,243 

41 Newton Young Men's Christian Association, The, 276 

Church St 276,652 

42 Norumbega Council, Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 259 

Walnut St., Newtonville . .... 41,544 

43 Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan Girls, Cor- 

poration of the, 24 Hovey St 97,212 

44 SenoJ Lodse Associates, Inc. * 

45 Stearns School Center 2,421 

46 Stone Institute and Newton Home for Aged People, 277 

Elliot St., Newton Upper Falls 610,286 

47 Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston, The, 206 

Waltham St., West Newton 156,274 

-None. » No report. 2 Restricted to capital. 



$6,296 



2,920 
10,615 



$6,840 



167 
164 



, $6,043 
6,544 



4,272 


51,250 


25,593 


1,064 
50 


962 


2,592 
5.087 


286 
100 


129 
289 


240 
515 


1,343 

1,446 

9 


71 


4,194 

2,060 

144 

120 


514 


11,095 


1,541 


- 


145 


8,979 


263 


1,985 


13,664 


4,038 


3,416 


3,765 


160 


5,848 


5,632 



687 



4,429 



4,442 
3,618 


4,097 
1,131 


724 


6,540 


6,790 


32,263 


- 


- 


354 


691 
655 


3,504 
201 


13 
306 
317 


1,435 


461 


37 


20,994 


1,079 


- 


2,825 


570 


36 


2,400 


4,505 


38,149 


4,016 
1,920 


5,632 
1,583 


63 
30 


70,609 


10 


2,695 


9,713 


5,391 


341 


64,866 
1,455 
5,400 

27,420 


294,729 

2,121 

3,669 

802 


20,826 

56 

69 

1,171 


11,580 


44,144 


4,421 


9,931 


2.263 


- 


2,207 


415 


3,061 


2.900 


56 


- 


5,069 


750 


22.001 


1,648 


9,074 


15,950 


3 Not stated. 







Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



117 





Current 
Receipts 


Current 
Expendi- 
tures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Number 
of Paid 
Officers 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Service or Relief Given 




Legacies 


Total 
Indi- 
viduals 


Indi- 
viduals 
Free 


Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 


Organi- 
zations 




$5,970 
/ 2,255 2 \ 
\ 200 / 


$25,150 

9.831 
10,780 


$20,809 

10,545 
10,777 


$3,232 
3,165 


1 


2 

1 


146 
143 


102 
143 


27 


2 


i 

2 
3 


- 


232 


248 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


100 2 


78,569 


84,455 


32,171 


- 


52 


1,789 


186 


- 


- 


5 


- 


4,620 
5.137 


4,963 

5,289 


1,680 
200 


1 


2 


476 
64 


_3 

64 


299 
57 


_ 


6 

7 


- 


656 
389 
515 


1,081 
384 
594 


70 


3 


1 


8 


8 


10 


13 

4 


8 
9 
10 


: 


5.608 

3,506 

153 

120 


4,003 

3,425 

224 

142 


1,298 


: 


2 


2,103 

97 

4 

4 


1,502 

97 

4 

4 


38 


1 
1 


11 

12 
13 
14 


- 


13,150 


13,638 


7,108 


- 


11 


350 


- 


- 


- 


15 


- 


9,169 


8,596 


3,393 


3 


5 


16 


- 


- 


- 


16 


- 


15.913 


13,912 


5,762 


1 


5 


60 


38 


- 


- 


17 


- 


11,870 


12,014 


6,178 


- 


8 


639 


239 


- 


- 


18 


- 


11,641 


12,164 


4,432 


1 


7 


529 


46 


- 


- 


19 


- 


5,394 


5,538 


1,489 


- 


11 


127 


20 


- 


- 


20 


- 


8,539 
5,483 


8,527 
4,858 


8,083 


_ 


20 


219 


19 


136 
35 


15 


21 
22 


3,001 2 


45,594 


41,933 


9,637 


1 


13 


54 


- 


- 


- 


23 


- 


354 


400 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


25 


700 


4,909 

306 

1,174 


4,640 
306 
522 


2,105 
100 


1 


5 


5 

2 


2 


- 


1 


26 

27 
28 


- 


1,933 


2,064 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


- 


22,073 


21,857 


2,340 


1 


_ 3 


2,800 


2,800 


- 


- 


30 


- 


3,432 


3,636 


1,185 


- 


8 


361 


361 


133 


28 


31 


5,767 


50,822 


90,419 


40,521 




50 


104 


104 


- 


- 


32 


- 


9,712 
3,534 


7,931 
3,949 


1,645 
817 


- 


1 
3 


1 
256 


1 
208 


80 


6 

2 


33 
34 


- 


73,314 


156,595 


3,098 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


14 


35 


- 


15,446 


16,614 


11,632 


- 


7 


1,654 


592 


- 


- 


36 


31.525 2 
500 


369,318 

3,632 

9,138 

29,893 


369,383 

2,975 

8,658 

30,064 


195,438 

722 

5,136 

9,102 


: 


230 
2 
4 
6 


9,004 
1,2216 


3,837 

_3 


245 


1 


37 
38 
39 
40 


1.500 2 


60,146 


60,443 


16,228 


- 


13 


3,000 


1,000 


30 


25 


41 


- 


12,195 


11,782 


7,352 


1 


3 


1,462 B 


_3 


- 


- 


42 


7.737 


13,421 


5,449 


2,557 


- 


3 


13 


9 


- 


- 


43 


98 


3,055 


3,007 


2,377 


- 


5 


350 


_3 


275 


15 


45 


/ 8,403 2 \ 
\ 2.500 / 


27,321 
29.172 


20,279 
8,585 


7,256 
1,999 


- 


9 
3 


26 
105 


" 


42 


: 


46 

47 



4 Report for 9 months. 



6 Membership. 



US 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Newton — Con. 

l Walker Misslonery Homes, Inc., 144 Hancock St., Auburn- 
dale ......... 

_' Weal Newton Community Centre, Incorporated, 492 
Waltham St., West Newton 

:\ Working Hoy's Home, 601 Winchester St., Newton High- 
lands ......... 

4 Young Men's Hebrew Association of Newton 1 

North Adams 
6 North Adams Hospital, The, Hospital Ave. (79 beds) 

6 Venerlni Sisters, Inc., 74 Marshall St 

7 Young Men's Christian Association of North Adams, 

Mass., The, 34 Summer St. 

Northampton 

8 Children's Aid Association of Hampshire County, 16 

Center St. 

9 Clarke School for the Deaf, The, 46 Round Hill 

10 Cooley Dickinson Hospital, The, 30 Locust St. (148 beds) 

11 Father Matthew Total Abstinence and Benevolent Society 

of Florence, 47 Pine St. 

12 Hampshire County Public Health Association, Inc., 240 

Main St 

13 Hampshire-Franklin Council, Incorporated, Boy Scouts of 

America, 38 Gothic St 

14 Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women in North- 

ampton, 215 South St. ..... . 

15 Northampton Visiting Nursing Association, Inc., 240 Main 

St. 1 

16 Smith Students' Aid Society, Incorporated 

17 Wright Home for Young Women, The, 96 Bridge St. 

18 Young Men's Christian Association of Northampton, 

Massachusetts, The, 29 King St. x 



$225,227 


$13,679 


$11,769 


$5,313 


6,710 


3,078 


314 


117 


203,928 


27,460 


24,243 


236 


467,124 
27,869 


15,284 
2,203 


63,638 
7,384 


3,863 


179,343 


12,831 


7,771 


- 


42,816 

2,532,868 

683,734 


5,286 

7,605 

12,130 


4,295 
,134,545 
121,970 


1,220 
65,311 
7,962 


5,001 


41 


309 


- 


6,792 


5,162 


287 


Ill 


3,617 


4,063 


2,244 


60 


353,882 


- 


8,947 


9,415 


92,076 
256,390 


2,042 


9,959 


5,445 

12,457 



NORTH ANDOVER 

19 Charlotte Home, The . 



20 



23 



North Attleborough 
North Attleborough District Nursing Association 

NORTHBRIDGE 

George Marston Whitin Gymnasium, Inc. 
Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The (15 beds) 

NORTHFIELD 

Northneld Seminary Students Aid Society 

Norton 
Barrowsville Community Service Corporation, The . 
Newcomb Home for Old Ladies of Norton, Massachusetts, 
The 

NORWELL 

Norwell Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 



Norwood 

27 Lewis and Anna M. Day Home for Aged in Norwood, Inc. 

28 Norwood Civic Association ...... 

29 Norwood Hospital (80 beds) 

Oak Bluffs 

30 Marthas Vineyard Hospital, Inc. (31 beds) 

Orange 

31 Orange Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., The . 

Oxford 

32 Oxford Home for Aged People ..... 

Palmer 

33 Wing Memorial Hospital Association (27 beds) 

Peabody 

34 Charles B. Haven Home for Aged Men in Peabody, 109 

Lowell St 

35 Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers . 

36 Hebrew Ladies Gemilath Chessad of Peabody, Massachu- 

setts ......... 



84,345 
7,529 



215,486 
82,442 



23,924 

2,567 
311,758 



785> 



111,372 
202,167 
457,648 



157,197 

445 

74,895 

45,059 



93,560 
29,337 



- 


- 


$2,469 


3,123 


521 


300 


5,000 
4,520 


11,008 


3.209 


984 


1,332 


968 


- 


- 


1 


11 


2,390 


10,594 


209 


1,123 


7 


3,619 


405 
122,546 


4,110 

58 

3,877 


462 


28,457 


3,776 


2,157 


906 


2 



130 
810 



26,533 



10 
377 



3,404 
305 



1,851 
371 



-None. 



1 No report. 



Restricted to capital. 



3 Membership. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



119 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$19,762 $19,418 $6,294 

3,511 3,717 2,559 

51,940 60,542 8,846 



9 


204 


11 


590 


17 


206 



85,078 
9,587 



20,602 



77,263 
7,625 



15,545 



34,126 
92 



,481 



52 



$1,000 2 
13,000 2 


10,801 
199,856 
142,063 


13,132 
188,536 
141,185 


5,083 

108,200 

53,473 


- 


351 


283 


55 


- 


5,561 


5,959 


1.800 


- 


6,368 


8,744 


4,636 


_ 


18,533 


17,597 


8,029 



17,447 12,719 

12,457 9,548 4,321 



1 


75 


- 


5 


2,164 * 


1,612 


4 
82 
120 


279 

157 

4,318 


218 

1 

25 


1 


- 


- 


- 


498 


490 


3 


1,293 3 




8 


39 


2 


3 


60 
23 





21 



265 



32 



24 



2,469 


1,348 


3,944 


3,953 


5,000 
18,944 


4,750 
17,014 



3,284 



4,761 



480 325 



11 825 

71 



400 



5,580 2 



1 


- 


- 


12,996 


11,510 


4,095 


1,340 


1,198 


364 


4,110 

463 

130,143 


778 

30 

128,529 


500 
61,729 


36,161 


33,337 


13,221 


3,066 


2,920 


2,020 


3,631 


1,001 


100 


28.001 


30,736 


13,680 


1,981 
1,191 


2,301 
1,191 


586 
50 



4 8- 

1 1,053 5 203 5 



79 


3,634 


85 


18 


338 


2 


1. 


239 


72 


- 


1 


1 


11 


847 


- 


2 


4 
12 


12 



107 



1,330 



4 Not stated. 



6 Visits. 



120 



Abstracts of Reports 



Name and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Peabody — Con. 
[saac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy Children 
Ladles Auxiliary of the Congregation Anshe Sfard of Pea 

body. Massachusetts, 4 Little's Lane . 
l.anis Hatzedek of Peabody, Incorporated 1 
Peabody Hebrew Ladies Aid Association, 23 Main St. 
Peabody Visiting Nurse Association 
Sutton Home for Aged Women in Peabody, 7 Sewall St, 

Pepperell 
Pepperell District Nurse Association, Inc. 

Petersham 
Petersham Exchange, The 

PlTTSFIELD 

Associated Charities of Pittsfleld, The, 33 Pearl St. . 
Berkshire Benevolent Association for the Blind, Inc., The 

30 Eagle St 

Berkshire Branch of the Woman's Board of Missions in 

Boston ........ 

Berkshire County Home for Aged Women, 89 South St 

(See also Lenox) 

Berkshire County Society for the Care of Crippled and 

Deformed Children, The, 472 West St. 3 
Berkshire County Tuberculosis Association, Inc., 16 

South St. 

Boys' Club of Pittsfleld, 16 Melville St. 3 
Epworth Mission of Pittsfleld, Mass., Robbins Ave. 
Hillcrest Hospital, 798 North St. (42 beds) 
House of Mercy, 741 North St. (194 beds) 

Junior League of Pittsfleld, Inc., 44 West St. . 

Kiwanis Health Camp of Pittsfleld, Inc., East New Lenox 

Rd. . 

Pittsfleld Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Lebanon Ave. 

Pittsfleld Day Nursery Association, 141 Francis Ave. 

St. Luke's Hospital of Pittsfleld, Massachusetts Inc., 379 

East St. (156 beds) 

Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfleld, Mass., 33 Pearl St 

Plymouth 
Boys' Club of Plymouth, The .... 

Chiltonville Community Club, Inc. 
Jordan Hospital, The (46 beds) .... 
Long Pond Ladies Aid Society .... 
Plymouth Community Nurse Association, Incorporated 
Plymouth Fragment Society ..... 
Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of the 

Princeton 
Girl's Vacation House Association, The .... 

Provincetown 
Provincetown Helping Hand Society .... 

Quincy 
Atlantic Women's Club, Inc., The ..... 
City Hospital of Quincy (Income paid to City of Quincy 

for hospital purposes) ...... 

Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Massachusetts, The, 

1359 Hancock St 

Knights of Columbus Civic Institute of Quincy, Mass., 

25 Foster St 

Quincy Council Girl Scouts, Inc. ..... 

Quincy Council Inc. of the Boy Scouts of America, 1135 

Hancock St. ....... . 

Quincy Day Nursery Association ..... 

Quincy Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., 1245 Hancock St. 
Quincy Women's Club, 148 President's Lane . 
Sailors Snug Harbor, of Boston, Palmer St. . 
William B. Rice Eventide Home, 215 Adams St. 

Wollaston Women's Club, 22 Beale St 

Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy, Mass., The, 

61 Washington St 



$34,255 



242 
3,015 



$1,984 



$233 



660 

477 



$151 



104,414 


20 


450 


4,357 


282 


439 


1,020 


- 


3,250 


146 


1,377 


- 


35,411 


19,380 


100 


936 


1,921 


741 


- 


92 


3,223 


4,606 


- 


134 


476,687 


3,082 


10,240 


15,973 


407,586 


3,744 


849 


7,190 


25 

570,253 

17,891 

94,891 

736,225 


7,871 

6,558 

342 

1,457 

21,191 


4,365 

47,096 
221,069 


6,569 

116 

812 

28,990 


.1,623 


848 


1,581 


36 


5,046 

126,913 

13,000 


1,352 
4,498 
4,075 


6,105 
561 


3,374 
52 


405,394 
22,652 


18,814 
10,436 


101,723 
6,207 


992 


32,647 

279 

342,846 

1,984 

3,012 

48,481 

102,779 


1,972 
52 

1,617 
4 

1,678 
80 

3,707 


678 

424 

46,737 

282 

2,082 

2 

794 


994 

6,364 

87 
2,071 
3,609 


38,012 


912 


1,299 


1,064 


65,789 


- 


- 


2,079 


1,796 


54 


44 


43 


122,486 


- 


- 


5,619 


14,567 


5,450 


233 


334 


8,019 
12,382 


1,606 
609 


57 


- 


25,221 
4,210 
3,200 
36,169 
376,975 
494,255 
15,303 


3,743 
20 
1,836 
2,576 
300 
3,650 
1,788 


4,246 

11 

7,252 

1,892 

1.500 
852 


109 

58 

78 

12,712 

19,298 

32 



17,956 



717 



Randolph 
Boston School for the Deaf . 



561,557 



93,347 



492 



None. 



1 No report. 



2 Visits. 



3 Report for 6 months. 



4 Membership. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



121 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



- 


$1,984 


$321 


$75 




384 


531 


- 


: 


660 
3,570 

4,827 


620 
2,698 
4,234 


1,916 
1,429 




1,459 


1,800 


930 


- 


1,523 


1,416 


235 


■ 


20,416 


20,416 


5,772 


- 


834 


583 


- 


- 


4,741 


4,925 


- 


$2,075 


32,063 


19,687 


6,801 


- 


11,783 


11,891 


6,389 


28,150 5 \ 
304 / 


7,871 

17,501 

458 

49,365 

262,556 
2,465 


8,849 

17,501 

504 

58,714 

269,184 
1,971 


2,372 

8,466 

75 

18,113 

105,844 
996 


_ 


1,352 
13,977 
4,688 


1,560 
15,083 
4,749 


374 
6,802 
2,795 


: 


120,537 

17,478 


120,635 
17,698 


32,414 
12,993 


500 
4,004 5 

1,600 
2,100 


4,145 

476 

54,719 

287 

3,547 

3,754 

6,602 


4,126 

480 

57,222 

372 

3,626 

1,751 

4,375 


1,570 

71 

28,939 

2,660 

855 


1,660 


4,936 


3,302 


1,350 


- 


2,079 


1,528 


- 


- 


159 


144 


- 


- 


5,619 


5,619 


600 


1,961 B 


6,018 


6,327 


2,864 


- 


1,606 
666 


1,576 
658 


798 


: 


7,989 
139 

9,147 

4,574 
13,012 
22,759 

2,672 


7,946 
159 

9,088 

6,430 
13,682 
19,333 

2,727 


1,948 

7,434 

444 

3,436 

3,599 


573 


29,047 


30,612 


11,108 


- 


117,547 


97,907 


42,177 


5 Restricted to capital. 


e 


Not stated. 



190 
1 



419 



1 2,409 2 478 2 

3 50 50 

3 - - 

50 50 



93 

2,468 4 



11,146 
462 



26 



24 

_6 



52 



92 3,574 168 

14 22,479 2 14,983 ; 



193 



774 



2 


400 * 


60< 


- 


_ 


1 


2 


. 2 


- 


2 


5 


1,346 


10 


- 


2 

22 


_6 


4,179 2 


2,033 2 


508 


- 


17 


17 


118 


- 


1 


6 


- 


— 


_ 


7 


125 


7 


_ 


_ 



2 


- 


- 


671 


1 


3 

445< 


3 

_6 


29 


2 


1,496 * 


_6 


- 


5 
1 
5 
4 


9.196 2 
20 
25 
21 
45 


4,626 2 
20 
25 

45 


15 


8 


2,604 


920 


- 



28 



122 



P.D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Naue and Address 



Total 
Property 
Reported 



Subscriptions 

and Gifts 

Restricted 

or not 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



Randolph — Con. 

1 Scth Mann, 2d, Home for Aged and Infirm Women, The 

Reading 

2 Reading Home for Aged Women » 

3 Reading Visiting Nurse Association .... 

Revere 

4 Beachmont Catholic Club, 714 Winthrop Ave. 

5 Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association of Revere 

6 Ingleside Corporation, The, 148 Prospect Ave. 

7 Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. .... 

Rockland 

8 French Home for Aged Women, The l ... 

Rutland 

9 Central New England Sanatorium, Incorporated (100 beds) 

10 Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc. 

11 Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational Association 

Salem 

12 Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute Women, 

in Salem, 180 Derby St 

13 Bertram Home for Aged Men, 29 Washington Sq. . 

14 Children's Island Sanitarium, The, Lowell Island (94 

beds) ........ 

15 Family Welfare Society of Salem, 126 Washington St. 

16 House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association, The, 

54 Turner St 

17 Lydia E. Pinkham Memorial, Incorporated, The, 250 

Derby St. 

18 Mack Industrial School 

19 Marine Society at Salem in New England, 18 Washington 

Sq 

20 North Shore Babies Hospital, The, 49 Dearborn St. (50 

beds) 

21 North Shore Council Inc., Boy Scouts of America, 176 

Essex St 

22 Plummer Farm School of Reform for Boys ' Winter Island 

23 Salem Animal Rescue League, 10 H Foster St. 

24 Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, 

5 St. Peter St 

25 Salem Charitable Mechanic Association .... 

26 Salem East India Marine Society, Trustees of the, 161 

Essex St 

27 Salem Female Charitable Society, The .... 

28 Salem Fraternity, 11 Central St 

29 Salem Hebrew Ladies Aid Society 

30 Salem Hospital, 81 Highland Ave. (156 beds) . 

31 Salem Relief Committee (Inc.), 250 Derby St. 

32 Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Friend Society, 

7 Carpenter St. ....... 

33 Salem Young Men's Christian Association, 288 Essex St. . 

34 Salem Young Women's Association, The, 18 Brown St. . 

35 Samaritan Society ....... 

36 Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association 

37 Woman's Friend Society, 12 Hawthorne Boulevard . 

Sandwich 

38 Sandwich Health Association, Incorporated 

Satjgtts 

39 Saugus Visiting Nurse Association 

40 Women's Civic League of Cliftondale, Inc., The 

Scituate 

41 Arwile Inc. ......... 

42 Children's Sunlight Hospital (70 beds) .... 

43 Lydia Collett Corporation, The 

Sharon 

44 Sharon Civic Foundation, The 

45 Sharon Sanatorium, The (50 beds) .... 

Sherborn 

46 Sherborn Widows' and Orphans 'Benevolent Society, The 

47 Altrurian Club of Shirley, The ..... 

-None. i No Report. 2 Visits. 



$238,277 



7,706 



501 
4,132 



2,500 
99,537 
6,021 



8,377 
495,860 



18,019 
3,100 



$325 



1,347 



$8,324 



4,859 
342 



$2,175 



4,013 


402 


408 


- 


73 


454 


649 


- 


138,080 


754 


2,312 


3,149 


4,232 


1,964 


4,060 


36 



334,174 
2,496 
3,043 


16,514 
144 
75 


47,784 
3 


1,302 
168 


371,563 
386,307 


473 


2,000 


12,513 
14,162 


111,257 
39,290 


7,629 
1,990 


5,660 


5,908 
1,424 


30,089 


758 


8,305 


1,264 


92,826 

72,852 


- 


19 


6,052 
2,986 


146,302 


- 


- 


5,965 


192,810 


14,936 


4,854 


6,243 


5,486 

175,824 

18,524 


6,712 

298 


1,028 

3,319 

175 


6,433 
643 


22,694 
1,922 


5,257 


786 


50 

58 


50,549 
58,145 

_3 

441 

1,563,304 

10,722 


95 

384 

323 

14,171 

956 


861 

1,117 

200,549 

384 


1,802 

2,540 

6,847 

5 

26,199 

497 


245,321 

212,315 

56,688 

61,268 

126,324 


25 

11,363 

420 

142 


2,739 

8,363 

2,432 

149 


8,471 
7,358 
1,444 
1,295 
5,890 


107,999 


4,023 


9,866 


3,774 


1,014 


920 


492 


30 



2,041 
40 



25,373 



322 



72 



5 

16,041 



583 



3 Not stated. 



Pt. II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



123 



Legacies 



Current 
Receipts 



Current 
Expendi- 
tures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Number 
of Paid 
Officers 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Service or Relief Given 



Total 
Indi- 
viduals 



Indi- 
viduals 
Free 



Families 
Exclu- 
sive of 
Indi- 
viduals 



Organi- 
zations 



$4,000 



290 4 



$8,905 



2,504 



1,443 



1,453 



$3,755 



2,141 



811 


797 


- 


1,103 


1,090 


- 


10,222 


10,411 


4,995 


6,061 


5,975 


4,935 



- 


65,601 
144 
246 


82,141 
377 
260 


32,922 


214" 

29« 


14,986 
14,162 


21,955 
11,206 


9,482 
4,569 


21,500 
110 


35,037 
9,185 


20,211 
11,871 


7,687 
5,214 


- 


10,337 


10,327 


7,377 


- 


6,052 
3,005 


4,993 
2,911 


4,014 
75 


- 


5,965 


4,783 


600 


3,935* 


26,034 


32,272 


12,356 


1,700 
750 


7,741 

11,452 

1,872 


6,463 

10,719 

1,695 


1,512 
4,840 
1,055 


- 


6,093 

58 


5,930 
25 


3,385 


200 4 
10,460* 


1,802 
2,635 
8,092 
1,446 
240,920 
1,838 


1,294 
2,568 
7,721 
1,549 
236,381 
2,243 


300 

4,526 

105,469 
1,380 


750 
750 
259 

500 4 \ 
1,155 / 


11,986 

28,181 

4,562 

1,586 

5,890 

16,820 


12,494 

23,286 

2,741 

1,787 

5,890 

14,797 


5,451 

10,249 

1,463 

300 

7,661 



400 



1,416 



2 2,571 2 



6 30 15 

3 7,473 2 - 3 



21 95 25 

250 250 



25 

4 


100 


100 


7 


600 


- 


5 


1,662 
13 


1,662 
13 


- 


13 


13 


26 


447 


233 


2 

7 
1 


1,936 5 

36 
1,666 6 


_3 

17 
1,201 6 


9 


519 


519 


2 

83 
1 


8 

70 

4,000 

40 

8,948 

172 


8 
70 

_3 

40 

4,200 

172 


7 
8 
3 


42 
1,260 s 
111 
46 
29 


5 

_3 

3 

46 
29 


6 


241 


94 


1 


525 


408 


1 


1.165 2 


_3 



7,425 
383 


9,155 
422 


5,003 
59 


22 
1 


291 
51,715 


297 

56,185 


25,450 


28 


591 


605 


- 


- 


511 


403 


30 


1 


to capital. 




J Membership. 


8 Animals. 



84 



236 



18 



11 



124 



P.D. 17 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



N auk and Address 





Subscriptions 




Total 


and Gifts 


Earnings 


Property 


Restricted 


and 


Reported 


or not 


Refunds 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 



SOMERVILLE 

tBBOCl&ted Charities of Somerville, 261 Pearl St. 
Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Women 
Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor, The, 186 High 

land Ave. (See also Boston) .... 
Portuguese-American Civic League of Cambridge and 

Somerville, 26 Springfield St 

Somerville Home for the Aged, 117 Summer St. 
Somerville Hospital, 36 Crocker St. (101 beds) 
Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association, The 
Somerville Rotary Educational Fund, Inc. 
Somerville Young Men's Christian Association, 101 High 

land Ave. ....... 

Visiting Nursing Association of Somerville, Massachu 

setts. S5 Central St 

Washington Street Day Nursery of Somerville 



$69,312 



81,637 



$2,514 



9,024 



$68 



$3,530 



7,150 

661,567 

337,796 

1,902 

6,247 


569 

3,078 

1,269 

149 

250 


668 

1,300 

132,347 

955 

75 


21,706 

5,011 

104 

5 


212,066 


16,598 


9,174 


145 


6,410 
6,495 


252 


7,250 


35 
183 



SOUTHBOROUGH 

Waucho Beneficent Corporation 



SOUTHBRIDGE 

13 Harrington Hospital Corporation (40 beds) 

14 Young Men's Christian Association of Southbridge 



276,982 
80,522 



22,759 40,941 

7,230 8,131 



500 
19 



Spencer 
Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse Association 



29,965 



1.115 



775 



Springfield 



16 


American International College, 963 State St. 


298,947 


13,449 


104,456 


3,438 


17 


Baby Feeding Association of Springfield, The, 83 State St. 


- 


— 


— 


— 


IS 


Catholic Woman's Club of Springfield, The, 27 Bowdoin St. 


5,309 


1,521 


1,634 


240 


19 


Community Chest of Springfield, Massachusetts, Inc. 












83 State St 


66,178 


292,207 


1,055 


1,211 


20 


Congregation of The Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy 












18 Margaret St. (See also Milford) . . . . 


939 


1,500 


285 


— 


21 


Daughters of Jacob Free Loan Association, 1862 Main St. 


909 


938 


17,456 


— 


22 


Daughters of Zion Old Peoples Home, 67 Massasoit St. . 


15,280 


1,108 


1,148 


— 


23 


Doane Orphanage Trust Foundation . 


66,344 


- 


118 


2,228 


24 


Dunbar Community League, Inc., 643 Union St. 


201,615 


14,326 


18,914 


3,174 


25 


Family Welfare Association of Springfield, 83 State St. . 


158,569 


39,435 


3,617 


4,772 


26 


Good Shepherd Association of Springfield, Mass., The 












584 Wilbraham Rd 


157,126 


13,495 


41,719 


60 


27 


Good Will, Inc., The 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


23 


Hampden Council, Boy Scouts of America, Inc., 83 State 












St 


33,579 


12,803 


7,384 


— 


29 


Hampden County Children's Aid Association, 83 State St 


126,481 


13,754 


21,670 


5,576 


30 


Hampden County Tuberculosis and Public Health Asso- 












ciation, 145 State St. 


41,616 


21,568 


1,461 


391 


31 


Hampton Club, Inc. of Springfield, Mass. 


437 


293 


217 


2 


32 


Horace Smith Fund, The ...... 


398,744 


- 


4,726 


28,455 


33 


James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of the 1 . . . . 










3-4 


Jewish Social Service Bureau, Inc., 1862 Main St. . 


- 


9,060 


1,019 


- 


38 


Junior Achievement, Incorporated, 33 Pearl St. 


91,379 


2,314 


1,694 


— 


36 


Legal Aid Society of Springfield, Massachusetts, Inc., The 












104 State St 


22 


6,134 


981 


— 


37 


Mercy Hospital of Springfield, Mass., The, 233 Carew St 












(330 beds) 


917,882 


2,038 


266,234 


1,246 


38 


New England District Council of the Assemblies of God, Inc 


147 


647 


547